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Switch to Forum Live View Holy Love=Holy Writ=Holy Love: A Meditation
6 years ago  ::  Jul 05, 2008 - 7:35AM #1
open2mystery
Posts: 11
Mentally picture someone who often makes you feel loved when you're with her/him.  This person might be a friend, spouse, parent, sister or brother, son or daughter, whomever you wish.  Or picture yourself in a situation where you often feel loved.  It might be inside or in the outdoors, in solitude, or in the company of some group.  As you imagine yourself with this person, or in this situation, notice how it makes you feel.  Savor that feeling.  Reflect upon its importance.  Now, allow me to suggest that in picturing, enjoying, and pondering being loved by this person or in this situation, you have the best possible clue about how God loves you. 

Now, picture someone for whom you have lots of love.  Again, it could be anyone you value highly.  Or, picture yourself in a situation where you often experience yourself as being a loving person.  The location might be in the wild, in a garden, on a street, or behind closed doors; the circumstances might have you alone or with others.  Now, allow me to suggest that in picturing, enjoying, and pondering being with this person or in this situation, you have the best possible clue about what God wills for you.   

Any chance you have to read some portion of the Bible, try asking yourself something along the lines of  "How does this scriptural passage put me in mind of what it's like when I'm with that person, or in that situation, and I know myself to be loved and/or loving?  How does this passage help me cherish and make sense of such occurrences of love?"  Don't worry if nothing springs to mind when asking such questions of a particular section of the scriptures.  Sometimes, you'll just draw a blank.  It's no big deal.  Maybe next time you read it, something may be summoned up.  Maybe a long time will pass before anything ever does.  "Trust in the Lord."  All that really matters is that you bring to every reading of scripture your own first-hand experiences of loving and being loved.  Equally important is that you allow every part of the Bible you read to open you up even more to receive God's love for you, as well as open you up to becoming an even more loving person.

Reading scripture in this manner, anyone can find a wonderful parallel between what the Good Book sets forth and everything good which happens in her/his own day-to-day living.  That's no coincidence.  The Bible is the recorded testimony of how two specific groups of people, over many years, came to understand themselves as loved by God and called to love others.  The Hebrew Law and Prophets document this growing realization among the people of ancient Israel and Judah.  The Christian Gospels and Epistles document this growing realization among the first followers of Jesus.  Therefore, it's quite practical for us today to expect these writings--these ancient testimonials to being loved and being called to love--to match up with our own experiences of being loved and being loving. 

It gets even better.  Since reading the Bible in relation to whatever's happening to us renders its contents more readily intelligible, it stands to reason that the scriptures will enable us to better understand and appreciate our own particular experiences of loving and being loved.  There's an ongoing exchange between the Book and our life.  Our loving involvements perpetually sheds light on the meaning of the Bible just as the Bible's testimony of how the Hebrews and first Christians loved and were loved illuminates our life in the present.  The Hebrew and Christian scriptures aren't news reports concerning long-ago events.  They are present revelation.  Reading them in this way empowers us in the here and now, to open up to God's love even more, and to act even more lovingly to increasing numbers of people.
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