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Switch to Forum Live View Gaelic Polytheist view of "faeries"...
5 years ago  ::  Dec 28, 2008 - 9:49PM #1
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663
So, coming from a Gaelic polytheist perspective, there are several types of "other" outside the various deities, especially the Aos Sidhe (people of the mounds), which in Gaelic lore is where they dwell.

As nature spirits comprise one of "the three" (ancestors, land spirits and Gods) in terms of reverence, I do find myself leaving offerings for the "kindly ones", if only to keep them from "mischief". Still I've never seen anything even remotely 'super natural', orbs or otherwise, so while I have no basis to believe in them objectively, subjectively I have my tradition to guide me to the proper etiquette necessary. According to the myths and folklore, feries are not always benign and are often hostile to people, children and even animals. Which is why we appease and acknowledge them in our daily rites and such.

The closest experience I've have had that relates to Spirits, relates to something which has been refered to in my trad as, KILLYOUANDEATYOU, which amounts to being in a location and suddenly having an overwhelming  sensation that something there wants terrible things to happen to you and you'd better get out now or else. I never had anything close to that happen elsewhere, and it was several years before I discovered the KILLYOUANDEATYOU essay, which gave my experience context according o my trad, which worked out nicely for me anyway.

An excellent source on belief in faeries is; The secret commonwealth and the fairy belief complex by Brian Walsh. It is both scholarly and based in a specific geographic region and period, but still it is an excellent examination of the belief in faeries.
Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 29, 2008 - 2:54AM #2
John_T_Mainer
Posts: 1,658
There are some excellent groups that work specifically with Faeries in the Celtic tradition.  Have you thought about contacting the Aquarian Tabernacle Church?  One of the priests that is associated with them is known as Blackcat, and he could probably provide you with a better grounding in the positive interactions with the Faery folk.

I am Asatru, and to us the spirits you ken Faeries we would call landwights.  It is usually these that are first felt by children, long before they complexify enough spiritually and intellectually to connect to the greater gods or sacred ancestors.  For many in our path, we prefer to hold our rituals out doors, and will seek out places where we feel the wights power.  With offerings you ask them to accept you as guests in their place.  In our rituals we share not only with our physical guests, but leave offerings as well for our dead, for our gods, and for the wights of the place.

Those places that have been used before really start to collect power.  It is always funny watching newcomers to the rites as they find themselves drawn to the same place I made my first offering in the park that I use for many of our rituals.  Nobody has to tell them, you can watch them as they seem to listen, then slowly turn, and wind their way to the same place.

The power of the landwights is not usually hostile.  I have been on land that didn't like me, one whose wights knew me as foreign.  I have also been on foreign soil and felt the gentle call of welcome from spirits as open as those of my own hearth.

Its not flashy or dramatic.  Its not scary or thrilling.  If you can open to it though, it has a quiet peace that helps to balance you, calm you, refresh you.

Seek out the ATC in Washington state, and see if someone there can explain it better in Celtic terms, ours are close but not really the same.  I hope this helps.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 29, 2008 - 8:27AM #3
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663

John_T_Mainer wrote:

There are some excellent groups that work specifically with Faeries in the Celtic tradition.  Have you thought about contacting the Aquarian Tabernacle Church?  One of the priests that is associated with them is known as Blackcat, and he could probably provide you with a better grounding in the positive interactions with the Faery folk.

I am Asatru, and to us the spirits you ken Faeries we would call landwights.  It is usually these that are first felt by children, long before they complexify enough spiritually and intellectually to connect to the greater gods or sacred ancestors.  For many in our path, we prefer to hold our rituals out doors, and will seek out places where we feel the wights power.  With offerings you ask them to accept you as guests in their place.  In our rituals we share not only with our physical guests, but leave offerings as well for our dead, for our gods, and for the wights of the place.

Those places that have been used before really start to collect power.  It is always funny watching newcomers to the rites as they find themselves drawn to the same place I made my first offering in the park that I use for many of our rituals.  Nobody has to tell them, you can watch them as they seem to listen, then slowly turn, and wind their way to the same place.

The power of the landwights is not usually hostile.  I have been on land that didn't like me, one whose wights knew me as foreign.  I have also been on foreign soil and felt the gentle call of welcome from spirits as open as those of my own hearth.

Its not flashy or dramatic.  Its not scary or thrilling.  If you can open to it though, it has a quiet peace that helps to balance you, calm you, refresh you.

Seek out the ATC in Washington state, and see if someone there can explain it better in Celtic terms, ours are close but not really the same.  I hope this helps.



Thanks for the info, but I don't live anywhere near Washington (I'm from Toronto), though now that I reread my post it does seem negative. I was just trying to stress that from (at least according to Irish folklore), that faeries are not always seen as benign, but that they can be helpful and friendly as well. The KILLYOUANDEATYOU probably detracts (or distracts) from that, perhaps posting the link to the article, so that those who want to can actually read it...

http://www.paganachd.com/articles/killyouandeatyou.html

In context it is also about practicing a Gaelic Polytheistic (or other CR trad) in non-Celtic environments, so just to expect the possibility of hostile land spirits, not that all land spirits are. I should have mentioned the positive experiences I've had, especially in certain areas, forests and some local rivers have always had the calming effect on me that you've mentioned.

Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 29, 2008 - 12:55PM #4
John_T_Mainer
Posts: 1,658
Oh sure some are.  They are bound by their own rules.  Take nothing to eat or drink, accept no gift that is not matched, do not sleep beneath their roof.  If all else fails they cannot abide the touch of iron.  They cannot lie, but almost always are never saying what you think you they are.  Do not follow their lights at night, do not join in their dance unless you are old in which case passing in a night of inhuman revel has got to be one of the more pleasant ways to go.

Its only really the Christians that lost the lore that are in trouble.  They may have to follow their own rules, but they don't feel inclined to point them out to the foolish.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 29, 2008 - 3:28PM #5
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663
I think some of the less informed Pagans and New Agers who dabble with them are in the same boat as the Christians who do the same,,,;)
Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 31, 2008 - 8:27PM #6
drakkoby
Posts: 16
You can eat fairy food with a fairy mouth, ie a deep sense of your own self, your essence, a confidence and a respect. You can be tested with crap and mirthfully refuse as well.  The naughtier ones may try human flesh on your plate to see if you freak out.  This is all my personal subjective stuff of course. :)
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3 years ago  ::  May 22, 2011 - 12:17PM #7
Mathonwy
Posts: 22

The fairies, as a race, are simply a re-imagining of the Celtic pantheon as tutelary spirits of the natural world, who themselves were simply a mystical tribe of people (later deified through myth and legend).


By that lineage I consider myself a fairy.  Not that there's any problem with mystifying something that can be seen as relatively mundane, but look for the fairy in other people, not in disembodied things meandering about your shrubbery on Halloween...

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