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7 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 12:25PM #1
paksmrbk
Posts: 47
Uruz has often perplexed me.  This rune is interesting because the 3 rune poems are so very different for the rune which is most often interpreted in a general way as "strength".  I can see some connections clearly & others...not so much.

Ok, first, here are the three verses fromm the various rune poems on uruz:

Anglo-Saxon: "The aurochs is proud and has great horns; it is a very savage beast and fights with its horns; a great ranger of the moors, it is a creature of mettle."

Norse: "Dross comes from bad iron; the reindeer often races over the frozen snow."

Icelandic: "Shower - lamentation of the gods - and ruin of the hay harvest - and abomination of the shepherd."

Hmm, yah.  The notion of fierce, almost primal, strength and passion comes through clearly from the Anglo-Saxon Rune poem.  Speaking of homophones, (mettle & metal) the Norse poem seems to be saying look to the raw material because the raw material governs the quality of the end result...I'm not sure what to make of the 2nd half of that poem & the Icelandic poem makes no sense in connection to the other two.

Any ideas?
paks
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2007 - 2:50AM #2
Aedgisl
Posts: 10
Well, maybe Uruz isn't just about strength but also about endurance and toughness in difficult situations, or mental strength. There are few types of weather nastier then frozen rain to endure. It is ice cold, you get very wet, and it is very treacherous (slippery) when on the ground.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2007 - 11:09PM #3
paksmrbk
Posts: 47
Ok, that makes sense - so if the A-S poem gives a visual of primal strength & the Norse gives a warning to "test the iron" (it may not be as strong as it appears to be), then the Icelandic poem tells you that strength may be needed at the very worst of times, the times when you don't want to be strong but you must yet endure...

The reindeer running over frozen snow?  maybe Uruz is that which enables us to keep moving when all seems impassable...

Thank you!
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 23, 2007 - 1:18PM #4
paksmrbk
Posts: 47
Cool link, Bron!  Ok, so involved then in Uruz is not just immediate strength, like a weightlifter, but also stamina, endurance...also, it may not be showy strength, but subtle...I liked that image of the sprout having the strength to break through the frozen earth in the springtime...Uruz is the irresistable force, not the immovable object...
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 23, 2007 - 1:18PM #5
paksmrbk
Posts: 47
Cool link, Bron!  Ok, so involved then in Uruz is not just immediate strength, like a weightlifter, but also stamina, endurance...also, it may not be showy strength, but subtle...I liked that image of the sprout having the strength to break through the frozen earth in the springtime...Uruz is the irresistable force, not the immovable object...
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 30, 2007 - 6:18PM #6
Walsung1of9
Posts: 111
Actually, I see Uruz as the immovable object.  When I look at it, it kinda looks like an un-stapled staple.
Futur Frau Doktor Jeri
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 27, 2008 - 1:25AM #7
paksmrbk
Posts: 47
Hmm - more thoughts - I can see where you're coming from, Jeri.  Sometimes Uruz strength helps us to stand firm, to not move or waver from where we need to be. - On the other hand, I've really been thinking about that quote that Bronwyn posted, from the Gylfaginning...I can really see why this made her think of Uruz.  The images are of terrible power, of destructive force (ice, fire, etc.) that somehow give rise to life...maybe there's an element of uruz that implies the power to bring life/hope/creation out of death/destruction/devastation...somehow I'm back to that reindeer running over the frozen snow that would bog down and freeze another beast...

Bronwyn - which book of Thorsson's were you reading that had that info on Uruz?  I think it's time for me to start doing a bit more homework & that may be a good book for me to start with.

Take care, y'all. paks
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 13, 2008 - 7:01PM #8
Walsung1of9
Posts: 111
I see your perplexity, Paks.  I knew nothing of Uruz when I started with runes.  I learned later it was associated with a creature called an Aurochs.  I keep seeing the Rune, however, whenever I see:

Dental Xrays
Cuboidal Epithelium (square-shaped cells)
Bone Slides
Unused Surgical Staples
Ambulatory Walkers
Cattle standing (rear view tail up)
Xrays of NORMAL hip joints
Claw nail beds (claws are outgrowths of bones)

and so on...

Futur Frau Doktor Jeri
Futur Frau Doktor Jeri
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 13, 2008 - 7:01PM #9
Walsung1of9
Posts: 111
I see your perplexity, Paks.  I knew nothing of Uruz when I started with runes.  I learned later it was associated with a creature called an Aurochs.  I keep seeing the Rune, however, whenever I see:

Dental Xrays
Cuboidal Epithelium (square-shaped cells)
Bone Slides
Unused Surgical Staples
Ambulatory Walkers
Cattle standing (rear view tail up)
Xrays of NORMAL hip joints
Claw nail beds (claws are outgrowths of bones)

and so on...

Futur Frau Doktor Jeri
Futur Frau Doktor Jeri
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 24, 2008 - 6:23PM #10
Einhverfr
Posts: 157
I suspect that Uruz has three different meanings because no Aurochses lived in Scandenavia.

The Younger Futhark poems seem to connect the stave with precipitation (drizzle, snow) while the Old English poem refers to the Aurochs.

I see the stave as representing wilderness, primordial form, and hence qualities of endurance.

Hope this helps.

Now, the OIRP stanza for Thurisaz is most interesting....
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