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6 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2008 - 1:13PM #1
Truth27
Posts: 523
Hi,

Chanting is a form of meditation that I strongly recommend.  In my particular brand of Buddism, we chant Na M- Myo Ho Ren Ge Kyo in place of meditation. This mantra means 'devotion to (or oneness with) the fundamental Unifyinng message of the Lotus Sutra'.  The lotus sutra's main message is two fold. First, it holds that we all have the opportunity and capacity to attain sustainable spiritual clarity and wisdom (ie Buddhahood). Second, it states that all things in the Universe have had access to the Ultimate Reality of sustainable cosmic clarity and wisdom (ie Buddhahood) WAY before the actual Buddha walked the earth, and they will always have access to it. It is a principle/state of existance, not a person. The fact that ALL have access has resulted in the Lotus Sutra being called the "King" of Sutras. Perhaps this is the actual meaning behind the idea that the "King of Kings" will one day hold strong sway on earth (as in heaven). Perhaps having a significant portion of humanity practice a Lotus Sutra-centered Buddhism is an important part of our path towards the type of individual internal spiritual development necessary to elicit sustainable peace on earth....

Peace.

P.S. - Note: The strong influence of the Lotus Sutra does not exclude the influence and importance of other faiths and traditions as well in securing sustainable peace.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2008 - 1:14PM #2
Truth27
Posts: 523
Does anybody else chant in place of meditation?  If so, what do you chant?

Thanks.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2008 - 8:14PM #3
Windhorse
Posts: 75
[QUOTE=Truth27;448900]Does anybody else chant in place of meditation?  If so, what do you chant?

Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Yes and I think of chanting as a meditaive technique.
There is a quote from  the book  "Luminous Emptiness" by Francesca Fremantle about  "understanding the Tibetan Book of the Dead" that generalizes chanting as energy:
"Speech is creative power, the power of mantra. All languages are sacred, not just Sanskrit, and any word or sound can be perceived as mantra. If we simply listen without expectations, hearing the emptiness behind the sound, we can become sensitive to its inner quality and the message it carries. It is the music of nonself and wakefulness. The poet Milarepa is often portrayed with one hand cupped to his ear, listening intently to his own songs as they arise out of his emptiness and silence. All speech can become the poetry of the dharma when it flows from that sense of spaciousness."

The author goes on to talk of the ordinary speech transformed into vajra speech by reciting mantras.  This gets into Tibetan mantras as the deity itself.

Namaste ;)
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2008 - 10:15AM #4
Spirit-Wind
Posts: 308
I've enjoyed chanting as meditation as well.  Sometimes I'll chant prayers that come to me in the moment.  Lately I've been chanting the universal mantra "aum". 

I'm a singer, so chanting feels natural.  It feels good to chant.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2008 - 4:05PM #5
nancyflorencecarlson
Posts: 170
I randomly get the urge to sing gibberish words that mean nothing from time to time.
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2008 - 5:48PM #6
spiritalk
Posts: 1,165
Chanting can be a part of meditation, not in place of it. 

Anything that tends to focus the mind (in a vision, in hearing, in speach) can and does become a meditation.
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6 years ago  ::  May 12, 2008 - 6:36PM #7
Sfltracey
Posts: 283
Truth,

I do some VERY basic mantras (Om, Na, Sa, Ra, etc.) while meditating. I can feel the vibrations in the upper left half of my body, the most sensitive part of me...energetically. I have an ongoing problem with my throat chakra so the mantras are helpful.
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 24, 2008 - 10:18PM #8
reikifeet
Posts: 1
enjoy chanting the abbreviated (5-line) version of 21 praises to tara. i was doing a mala each day but have dropped that particular ball -- sometimes i keep the mala in my pocket and manage to chant to myself *while* i walk my brisk 40 minutes. nothing like multitasking, and i think i remember hearing on an anthony robbins tape that moving while chanting, doing affirmations, etc. helps imprint the info into our cellular energy?

also i've recently had several opportunities to attend tibetan buddhist prayer service, chanting the prayers in tibetan and then the english translation.  almost always there is a noticeable difference the next day -- once i felt a definite opening of my heart toward certain people, increased compassion and desire to work things out.  another time it was much more subtle, to the point i'd have to consult my journal for specifics, but always *something*, even if only an increased commitment to keep striving for consistency in practice :)

i don't think i'm supposed to be chanting to the exclusion of meditation, although it's much more fun & brings quicker results. meditating often seems like a chore, that's mostly why i'm here, would like an accountability partner with a similar practice goal.
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5 years ago  ::  Aug 30, 2009 - 9:48PM #9
Ipaul
Posts: 1

I'll usually chant the Refuge and then the Tashi prayer at the beginning of practice. I'll also say mantra for a bit, but generally the bulk of my session is silent.

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5 years ago  ::  Aug 31, 2009 - 12:43AM #10
Serf
Posts: 1

Does anyone have any good sites that have chanting that one can use to chant with--downloads preferably, but also on-line. Nothing too complicated.

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