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Switch to Forum Live View Do you still follow some of your birth religion's traditions
6 years ago  ::  Feb 22, 2008 - 2:09PM #1
CLHazz
Posts: 94
Hello, I am curious. I was born Catholic and as it is the season of lent I was wondering does anybody else who like me decribe themselves as Spiritual, but Not Relgious still practice some of the relgion that you were born into. And if so do you feel any amount of guilt if you don't completly follow the tradition? An example of today: For Lunch I had a Chicken and Cheese Quesdilla Lean Pocket and it's Friday. I silently said, "Forgive me god" then went about my day. Thanks.
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 26, 2008 - 10:23AM #2
erthmohr
Posts: 41
I traded in my beliefs years ago for ideas.  I find ideas much easier to shift about as my understanding changes.

Even as a child I had a problem accepting the teachings of Southern Baptist churches.  Who would want such a mean god?
I didn't.  I just couldn't get with hell and all that.

I love to experience GOD rather than just talking about all the many concepts of god man creates.  Perhaps if we all just took a break and experienced love.. experienced god.. the divine, we would think differently.

Smiles,
Donna
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 28, 2008 - 6:47PM #3
spiritalk
Posts: 1,165
In some ways, yes we always follow our birth tradition.  Each and every experience of life is a building block to who we become day by day, year by year.  We don't leave anything behind, we build upon.

There is no status quo in nature - there is only growth.
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 28, 2008 - 6:47PM #4
spiritalk
Posts: 1,165
In some ways, yes we always follow our birth tradition.  Each and every experience of life is a building block to who we become day by day, year by year.  We don't leave anything behind, we build upon.

There is no status quo in nature - there is only growth.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 01, 2008 - 12:23AM #5
javababe
Posts: 40
Interesting interpretation of 'birth religion'. I was raised in a catholic home, but I believe that my 'birth religion' is a pagan based belief. I always believed as a child that all living things shared a spiritual connectedness. I believed that the earth was a living entity - rocks, trees, earth, water....it all was alive. I believed that there was a mother god (goddess as I know her now) but I couldnt verbalize any of this and kept it all to myself. I also believed that humans and animals could communicate on a primitive level if we opened ourselves to it. These were intuitive beliefs. I had to submerge these ideas deep within my soul as I grew older, as you can imagine, the religious system in which my family was steeped would have in no way tolerated these ideas. I left the catholic church and ALL of its teachings (somehow the guilt aspect has remained) to become a fundamentalist christian. However, after growing weary of the repressive teachings, I am returning to my 'birth religion' and finding the way back home to the womb of the Goddess, mother earth, and all her inhabitants. My soul is settling.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2008 - 1:57AM #6
seeker18
Posts: 68
[QUOTE=CLHazz;306272]Hello, I am curious. I was born Catholic and as it is the season of lent I was wondering does anybody else who like me decribe themselves as Spiritual, but Not Relgious still practice some of the relgion that you were born into. And if so do you feel any amount of guilt if you don't completly follow the tradition? An example of today: For Lunch I had a Chicken and Cheese Quesdilla Lean Pocket and it's Friday. I silently said, "Forgive me god" then went about my day. Thanks.[/QUOTE]
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Good question, C.L.!  I, too, was raised Catholic, but converted to Judaism several yrs ago.  I don't practice any part of Catholicism, now, of course.  As for guilt, now I have it for not "completely following the religion," of my Jewish faith!   :o   But not too much, because Reform Judaism is open to personal interpretation, when it comes to how observant one is.  The Catholic Church, on the other hand, is practically the opposite of that, so its former adherents are more likely to suffer (pre- and) post-conversion residual guilt. 

It is kinda sad/funny that I can't buy one of those cute, tiny little bunny figurines that they have in stores, now, because it's laden with "Easter" symbolism.  (I suppose I could, and proclaim it to be all about springtime, heh heh...) 

Enjoyed reading these posts.  Spiritalk, you said: Each and every experience of life is a building block to who we become day by day, year by year. We don't leave anything behind, we build upon.  There is no status quo in nature - there is only growth.  That is so true!  :cool:
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2008 - 8:36AM #7
CLHazz
Posts: 94
Thank you for your replies. I now know I am not alone in how I feel.  It is difficult to completely separate myself from the Catholic religion because I am surrounded by people who are active particpants in it and don't question, my friend John goes to church every Sunday and goes Saturday when he can't. I live in Massachusetts. Most of the churches we have are Catholic.  In Leominster there are 4. I do on occasion go with my friend, but the masses turn me off, I don't feel anything, though everything is familiar. Going to a building to worship just isn't my thing.  The belief o matic quiz listed Neo Paganism 1st with Unitarian in a close third and Theravada Buddhism coming in second. Catholic was second to last. How do you completely leave the religion to which you were born into when you are completely surrounded by it? I reject what I was brought up in, but am having trouble separating myself from it. I have researched other denominations, but again I am not someone who goes to church on a regular basis, I don't drive and my paratransit doesn't run on Sundays. Does anyone have any thoughts on this? Does anyone understand what I am saying here? Thanks.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2008 - 5:32PM #8
spiritalk
Posts: 1,165
Standing out in your own spirituality can sometimes be quite a struggle between what is expected of us and what is right for us.  Doing what is right for you will open your spirituality.  Doing what is expected will have no effect upon spirituality.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2008 - 10:30PM #9
pagansister
Posts: 30
I was raised a Methodist, but by the time I was 17 had decided that what I was being taught was more fairy tale than anything real.  Met a Unitarian in college, married him and raised our 2 children in the UU church.  One is now a pagan and the other an atheist.  I take my current beliefs from various religions.  Do I regret leaving the Methodist church?  No, never have.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 04, 2008 - 10:17AM #10
Alison_k
Posts: 9
For most of my youth I was a muslim, but I now don't know what I consider to be my beliefs!

I still find the Islamic prayer to be relaxing, it stills my frantic mind, but I tend to use it more as a mantra than an actual prayer.

A lot of Islamic ideals I still hold true, such as modesty of dress, and serving God before anything else. But I have found an outlet for some of my beliefs in a simple form of paganism (which I always believed was my true path, even though I couldn't admit it to anyone).

I do feel guilty for not being a muslim any more, and I have received numerous personal attacks for no longer following this faith.
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