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Switch to Forum Live View How do you meditate?
5 years ago  ::  Feb 02, 2010 - 7:22PM #71
Donnaferri
Posts: 7

Does anyone have experiece with using meditation for general health reasons -- other than the often cited benefits like reducing stress that leads to chronic disease? I read an article earlier this winter on a study trying to determine this.


Although scientists know meditation reduces stress and that exercise can prevent chronic diseases, they still don’t seem to know if meditation or even exercise makes the immune system better able to fight respiratory infections. bit.ly/amgLc3


But maybe it makes sense to practice regularly and see if this works better than without meditation or yoga (or tai chi or other exercise). Probably moderation even in exercise would strengthen the immune system. Thoughts anyone?

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 27, 2010 - 4:05AM #72
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 862

Feb 2, 2010 -- 7:22PM, Donnaferri wrote:


 Does anyone have experiece with using meditation for general health reasons -- other than the often cited benefits like reducing stress that leads to chronic disease? I read an article earlier this winter on a study trying to determine this.


Although scientists know meditation reduces stress and that exercise can prevent chronic diseases, they still don’t seem to know if meditation or even exercise makes the immune system better able to fight respiratory infections. bit.ly/amgLc3


But maybe it makes sense to practice regularly and see if this works better than without meditation or yoga (or tai chi or other exercise). Probably moderation even in exercise would strengthen the immune system. Thoughts anyone?





Theravada Buddhism


 


This School of Buddhism offers a Course of Meditation which works with Respiration, exclusively.


 


However, one does not carry out the practice to 'cure' specific illnesses but, rather the Meditator's general health will improve, both mentally and physically.


 


Since breath is essential for life-support, it follows that working with the breath is central to Theravadin Buddhist Practice.


 


I have severe mental illness and disabilities but my Buddhist Teacher is both qualified to Teach Meditation and a qualified Medical Practitioner. Her advice to me has always been that I should not expect to cure illnesses by meditating and that I should consult my doctor for advice about Meditation.


 


Since 1991, she has thoroughly researched my disability and sent me for medical consultation in order to obtain qualified medical advice about my condition.


 


As a doctor, she is then able to know which meditation practices are safe for me and which meditation practices are unsafe.


 


Example:


 


My condition is mental and affects my central nervous system, and all of my senses. Consequently one of the conditions is incessant talking. When I go on a Buddhist Retreat, I am supposed to practise the Noble Silence. But, I cannot, I just have to talk.


 


On one occasion, another meditator complained about my talking to my Buddhist Teacher. She very politely asked him to be a little more tolerant because I had a medical condition which made it impossible for me to sit in silence, and that to try and suppress my speech would be very dangerous.


 


A Buddhist Teacher who is qualified to Teach Mediation but unqualified medically may not know that.


 


The point being that if one is ill, maybe a qualified doctor is a better choice for remedial help. And that any meditation is practised in the context of qualified medical advice.


 


But:


 


Theravada Buddhism Teaches two kinds of Meditation:


 


Tranquillity Meditation and Insight Meditation.


 


Tranquillity Meditation is for calming the mind.


 


Insight Meditation is for the Development of Wisdom, Insight into Reality.


 


The Methods of Meditation all work exclusively with respiration, Breath.


 


But, the English word 'Meditation' is a rather misleading term for the Buddhist Path, which is a course in Mental Development.


 


There are Three Aspects to Mental Development, According to Buddhism:


 


Ethical:   Speech, Action, and Livelihood.


 


Psychological: Effort, Mindfulness, and Concentration.


 


Philosophical  Understanding and Thought.


 


The basic ground for success in this practice of Buddhist Meditation is a very thorough foundation in Ethics. The basic formula for success in this practice is:


 


Ethics + Psychology, + Philosophy


 


But more usually, this formula is stated as Morality + Concentration + Wisdom.


Back in 1990, I could only manage to sit for a minute at a time. Now, I can sit for up to one hour and maintian a single posture without figeting, whilst remaining silent. But, remaining silent, mentally is more difficult, but not impossible. I am beginning to slow my mind down and relax more, and my respiration is improving.


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 04, 2010 - 1:57AM #73
Marina_J
Posts: 25

I could give you no advice but this: to go into yourself and to explore the depths where your life wells forth. Good luck!

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 12, 2011 - 4:29PM #74
KostJ
Posts: 1

Question. How do you know how long you have been meditating with out opening your eyes and looking at a clock every few mins. I am looking to meditate for 30 mins but I unable to figure out how to know when the 30 mins are up. Does anyone have any suggestions?

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 28, 2011 - 6:24AM #75
Ricketsjohn
Posts: 4

I simply go in the park, find a quite place, sit in a comfortable position and I easily start to calm my mind. I do meditation sometimes with music, because it gives me more power of concentration.

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