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Switch to Forum Live View Feds to Require Registration of Recreational Drones
1 year ago  ::  Oct 19, 2015 - 1:47PM #1
Merope
Posts: 14,591

Federal regulators are planning to require recreational drone users to register their aircraft with the government for the first time in an attempt to restore order to US skies, which have been invaded by rogue flying robots.


US officials still need to sort out the basic details of the registration system but concluded that they had to take swift action to cope with a surge in sales of inexpensive, simple-to-fly drones that are increasingly interfering with regular air traffic.


“The signal we’re sending today is that when you’re in the national airspace, it’s a very serious matter,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx told reporters.


Pilots of passenger planes and other aircraft are reporting more than 100 sightings or close calls with rogue drones a month — a significant increase just in the past year, according to the FAA.


Under FAA guidelines, drone owners are not supposed to fly their aircraft above 400 feet or within 5 miles of an airport without permission.  But the rules are widely flouted, and officials have been largely powerless to hunt down rogue drone operators.


Requiring drones to be registered will be of limited use for investigators unless the drones crash and a registration number can be found.  Most drones are too small to appear on radar and do not carry transponders to broadcast their locations.  But regulators hope that forcing owners — many of whom are aviation novices — to register their drones with the government will at least make them think twice about their responsibility to fly safely and the possibility that they could be held accountable for an accident.


The FAA and the Transportation Department are setting up a task force composed of government officials and industry representatives to devise the new registration system.  Foxx said the group has until November 20 to finalize its recommendations so the government can set up the registry before Christmas — the peak season for drone sales.


The task force will have to wrestle with the basic question of size limits and what kinds of drones will have to be registered.  Most consumer models weigh only a few pounds and resemble toys, but many can easily reach altitudes above 1,000 feet.


Foxx said the registration rules will also apply to people who have already bought drones in recent years, not just new owners.  He said the FAA would impose penalties — which he did not spell out — on anyone who does not comply.


Nobody knows exactly how many drones are flying around, but most estimates top 1 million.  The Consumer Electronics Association, an industry group, estimates that hobbyists will buy 700,000 drones in the US this year, a 63% increase from last year.


In addition to snarling air traffic, nuisance drones across the country have interfered with firefighters, flown into tall buildings, and crashed into bystanders on the ground.  Criminals have used them to smuggle contraband into prisons.  Some property owners have become so irritated by drones buzzing overhead that they have gotten out their shotguns and opened fire.


In general, the drone misadventures have been taking place in a regulatory vacuum.  The FAA has banned most businesses from flying drones until it can finalize new safety rules — a step that will take at least another year.


But hobbyists who fly drones for fun are largely unregulated.  Under a law passed by Congress in 2012 to protect model-airplane enthusiasts, the FAA is prohibited from imposing new restrictions on recreational drone owners.  As a result, they have not been required to obtain pilot licenses or undergo training.


Although the FAA lacks the authority to license recreational drones, it does have the power to impose civil fines on anyone who recklessly interferes with air traffic or endangers people on the ground.  Foxx also said the FAA has the authority to require the registration of any aircraft that fly in the national airspace — drone or human piloted.


Your thoughts?


www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-se...

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 19, 2015 - 2:34PM #2
BDboy
Posts: 8,220

Right move.

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 19, 2015 - 3:06PM #3
TPaine
Posts: 10,308

Oct 19, 2015 -- 2:34PM, BDboy wrote:


Right move.



I agree. They can be a threat to low flying aircraft.

"To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist by scripture."-- Thomas Paine: The Crisis No. V (March 21, 1778)
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1 year ago  ::  Oct 19, 2015 - 3:32PM #4
TemplarS
Posts: 7,522

With the right attachments they can be a threat to a lot more than that.

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 22, 2015 - 10:23AM #5
Druac
Posts: 14,509

I'm a quad-copter (drone) owner and operator, and I agree whole-heartedly. I wouldn't even mind if they decided to require licensing for certain models and types. The biggest issue for responsible operators is the casual way that inexperienced operators use them. Dumb asses and greedy f**ks like to ruin things for everyone else.


Thanks to DJI, they are getting safer to fly and they are building in lots of safety features, like my newest model, the Inspire 1. Geo fencing and sensors allow for some great flying and aerial photography. You can't even take off with these things if you are close to an airport...as they have built-in no-fly zones using geo fencing.



www.dji.com/product/inspire-1


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1 year ago  ::  Oct 22, 2015 - 12:38PM #6
TemplarS
Posts: 7,522

Agreed, Druac-


This technology seems to me to be like the early days of the automobile. Very useful (and we probably have no idea as to what some of those uses will be), as well as fun.


But a defective or improper design, or one of these things in the wrong hands, either malicious or incompetant- like the auto, it can be a killer.


Thank God there is no second amendment for drones...


 

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 28, 2015 - 11:46AM #7
Merope
Posts: 14,591

This thread was moved from the Hot Topics Zone.

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 28, 2015 - 12:19PM #8
Erey
Posts: 21,730

Darn it!  Just when I was going to buy my first drone

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 28, 2015 - 3:58PM #9
Stardove
Posts: 17,597

What kind of laws if any for model planes?


Is there a difference other than cameras?


Model plane enthusiasts take flight near Marion


Since 1957, Mike Fedor of Arlington, Texas, has been flying model airplanes.

“When I was a kid, my next door neighbor owned a hobby shop and it’s what got me started.”

For the last three years, he said he’s participated in the Heart of America Free Flight Association’s event in Marion.

“Coming to these events is like going to a family reunion where we get together,” he said. “Some of these people I have known for 50 years.”

Pointing to a man walking near the runway, Fedor said, he’s been flying with that person for more than 50 years.

“He was the best man at my wedding.”

Fedor has always been around planes, too.

In addition to his model airplanes, he worked almost 40 years for Vought Aircraft in Grand Prairie, Texas.

“The plant (in Grand Prairie) opened in 1968,” he said, “and at that time, Chance Milton Vought owned it and other locations.”


More at the link.


See this link about both: FAA restricts drone and model aircraft within 5 miles of airports

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1 year ago  ::  Oct 29, 2015 - 12:47AM #10
Aka_me
Posts: 14,464

I wonder how difficult it would be to add enough electronics to drones that they could take advantage of something like Google Earth with aeronautical overlays to identify whether it is currently in a restricted category of airspace.


instead of looking at street information one can look at color coded space indicating what kind of zone one is currently in:


www.wikihow.com/Overlay-Sectional-Aerona...


and not take off if currently in a restricted zone, or "automatically return home" if attempting to fly into a restricted zone.

I dream in my lifetime uhmericans will come to realize hezbollah, hamas, and isis gain followers by helping society AND the only way to defeat them is to perform greater good.

the average person is 8 times more likely to be murdered by a cop than a radical terrorist
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