Post Reply
Page 3 of 7  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next
Switch to Forum Live View Marijuana, Pot, Chronic...
2 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2012 - 7:12PM #21
Druac
Posts: 12,231

Nov 8, 2012 -- 7:09PM, amcolph wrote:


Nov 8, 2012 -- 4:43PM, Ed.W wrote:


I think Colorado and Washington are fixing to find out that they are running nothing.  This law will never go into effect.




What about state's  rights, Mr. Conservative?




That doesn't matter, only when it is something they "believe" in.

Jesus Is My Savior...He Saves Me From REALITY!
---------------------------------------------
We created god in our own image and likeness!
[George Carlin]
---------------------------------------------
"Reason & Logic" - A Damn Good Slogan!
---------------------------------------------
"Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion." - Steven Weinberg, an American physicist
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2012 - 9:40PM #22
catboxer
Posts: 14,012

Mexico to reconsider joint policy? Sounds like a pipe dream to me.

Adepto vestri stercore simul.ttr
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2012 - 10:05PM #23
catboxer
Posts: 14,012

This drug should have been legal for everyone and anyone over age 15 long since.


At worst it's a harmless giggle, and can be habit forming (but not addictive like nicotine or alcohol).


At best, it's got significant medicinal value, for treating glaucoma, nauseau during chemotherapy, the  movement disorders PD and MS, chronic intense pain of all sorts, and other conditions as well.


Whiskey, beer, and cigarettes are part of the old, fading culture which took such a beating Tuesday nite. Times have changed, and so have our drugs of choice.


Welcome to the future. Welcome to the ∆G3 øƒ ∆QV∆®!V$.


Come in! We're œpen.

Adepto vestri stercore simul.ttr
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 9:24AM #24
drawout
Posts: 5,910

  Sports have messed up peoples minds. We cant stand loosing. Many people wish we had never left Vietnam and Iraq. The war on drugs is no different than the war in Afghanistan. We will never make those people love us no matter how long we fight them. Same is true for the war on drugs. People will always want to get high like their ancestors have for countless millennia. There has never been any hope of victory. In all these cases the people who make money from the war are the ones who want it to continue. The people who get killed do not matter at all to those who want to continue the fight. Whenever we stop these wars it becomes apparent that the enemy was never a threat to us.


In every place that legalization has been tried it  has been a huge success.

'When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.' - Mark Twain
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 9:45AM #25
TENAC
Posts: 27,250
I thought the headline was a pretty good pun!
Any man can count the seeds in an apple....
.......but only God can count the apples in the seeds.
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 11:02AM #26
drawout
Posts: 5,910

Nov 9, 2012 -- 9:45AM, TENAC wrote:

I thought the headline was a pretty good pun!



Only if you are high.

'When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.' - Mark Twain
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 11:15AM #27
Do_unto_others
Posts: 9,155

Nov 7, 2012 -- 11:54AM, Girlchristian wrote:

Whatever you call it, two states legalized its use (for any purpose) yesterday. One state, Oregon, said no to its legalization.

politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2012/11/07...


From Colorado: The voters have spoken and we have to respect their will," Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper said in a written statement released by his office. "This will be a complicated process, but we intend to follow through. That said, federal law still says marijuana is an illegal drug so don't break out the Cheetos or gold fish too quickly.   


Is this something that will force the feds to 'get with it' on their marijuana policies? Does it really make sense for states to vote to make it legal when the feds still say its illegal? Does this set up a battle between these states and the feds?


   




No more so than the mis-named "Defense" of Marriage Act does. ;{O)

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 11:19AM #28
Do_unto_others
Posts: 9,155

Nov 7, 2012 -- 1:50PM, mindis1 wrote:


I doubt that anyone knows what will be the DOJ’s immediate response to the laws in Washington and Colorado. Of course, the way to obviate any conflict between federal and state laws is to change the federal law. Until then, individual states passing such laws is a step in the right direction.


Americans should be encouraged to use marijuana rather than taking all the prescription drugs that make people suicidal and violent and increase mortality hazard, whereas marijuana increases people’s creativity and spirituality and politeness.





Amen. +1. I just finished the 2nd chapter of my new book. Pass the chips, please.

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 11:23AM #29
Do_unto_others
Posts: 9,155

Nov 7, 2012 -- 2:03PM, mindis1 wrote:


A few facts about marijuana:


The government would save an estimated $13.7 billion on prohibition enforcement costs and tax revenue by legalizing marijuana, according to a paper endorsed by 300 economists.


Inmates incarcerated on marijuana-related charges cost U.S. prisons $1 billion annually, according to a 2007 study, AlterNet reports.


Including lost tax revenues, a 2007 study found that enforcing the marijuana prohibition costs tax payers $41.8 billion annually, Forbes reports.


Including lost tax revenues, a 2007 study found that enforcing the marijuana prohibition costs tax payers $41.8 billion annually, Forbes reports.


It's estimated that illegal marijuana is a $36 billion industry in the U.S., MadameNoire reports.


About one-third of Americans say they think legalizing marijuana would boost the economy, according to a 2010 poll by Associated Press-CNBC.


The Sacramento News and Review saw a big boost in ad revenue when it offered advertising space for more than 60 medical marijuana dispensaries, enabling the publication to hire three additional employees, according to News 10.


Mendocino County, California's zip tie program aimed at regulating medical marijuana growing by charging permits for each plant raised $600,000 in revenue in for the Sheriff's department in 2011.


The city of Oakland, California raised $1.3 million in tax revenue from medical marijuana dispensaries in 2011, 3 percent of the city's total business tax revenue, according to The New York Times.


In 2011, Colorado pulled in $5 milllion in sales taxes from medical marijuana businesses, The New York Times reports.


Economist Stephen Easton estimated in 2010 that legal marijuana could be a $45 to $100 billion industry, Bloomberg Businessweek reports.


When hydroponic marijuana growing supply chain weGrow opens a new store it creates an estimated 75 jobs indirectly, according to AZBusiness Magazine.


More than 60 percent of states agree with taxing marijuana, according to a poll by Associated Press-CNBC.


www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/06/amendm...





But ... but ... but ... REEFER MADNESS. DEATH TOLLS. STONED DRIVING. LACK OF ATTENTION SPAN. LETHARGY.


Congrats on producing some very useful, informative stats, but their minds are made up and they don't want to be confused by facts. The anti-squad want to live in a fact free world.

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Nov 09, 2012 - 11:25AM #30
Do_unto_others
Posts: 9,155

Nov 7, 2012 -- 2:25PM, Aka_me wrote:


Nov 7, 2012 -- 2:18PM, Stardove wrote:

Part of the Texas Democratic platform is to make marijuana legal.  Currently not even medical marijuana is legal in the state.  Go Dems!  I don't smoke it, but might if it were to go legal in my state.



just remember, it still wouldn't be federally legal. you don't "bend" laws with speeding, or stop signs, or anything? that's amazing.


I have no intention of smoking, though once had the nickname iron lung.


it's as simple as looking at reality and accepting facts...


in reality alcohol prohibition made criminals rich. and the fact is, the same thing is happening now.


criminalization isn't working, we're a nation of druggies, taking the money out of the criminal's hands and putting it into the government's couldn't come at a better time.





Totally agree, aka me. But like I said, "looking at reality and accepting facts" is NOT what the anti-squad DO.

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 3 of 7  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook