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Switch to Forum Live View Finding Nemo or A thriving fish industry... in the Israeli desert
2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 2:54PM #1
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,938
More good news from Israel :-)

Finding Nemo or A thriving fish industry... in the Israeli desert

Where can you find Nemo? In Israel's Arava desert, where aquaculture is blooming despite a dearth of fresh water.

Israel's Arava desert gets just 30 millimeters of rainfall a year, but it produces 60 percent of Israel's fresh vegetable exports, 10% of cut flower exports ... and now it has a thriving ornamental fish industry, too.

"The desert is dry and all the water that we have here first of all is water that we drill here in the Arava; we're not connected to a national water system," explains Alon Gadiel, director Arava Research and Development Center.

Yet Israel is in the top six exporting countries for aquarium fish, and there are now 18 fish farms in the Arava. Three of them breed the clownfish better known as Nemos because of the hit movie "Finding Nemo."

"A business like aquaculture is a very good business because you don't need a lot of land, and you don't need a lot of water. You need a lot of knowledge," says Gadiel.

In addition, he stresses, "We breed fish that originally grow in the sea, and we sell them from captivity so we prevent harming the ecosystem."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLX8qR1pmZI&feat...

Boycott Nemo? Really?

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 4:13PM #2
Amin21
Posts: 4,643

Some of my bigger concerns when it comes to Israel and other nations is the environmental impact of over using mined water resources in Aquifers... in conjunction with over population...


In the book "Secrets of the Sands" the environmental catastrophes of a particular Oasis's 12,000 years of human history.... tell a lot about over use of water and population collapse.


I feel like Israel is way over extending themselves...

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 6:04PM #3
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,938

Amin


Israel is investing heavily in desalination plants and technology in order to ensure that there are sufficient water resources. They are expected to become a net exporter of water in the next few years. I am fairly certain that their desalination efforts will not result in the draining of the Mediterranean. 

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 6:30PM #4
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,938

Israel Water Authority - Water Purification


www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfBA4x8P8QQ&feat...


Israel Water Authority - Water Conservation


www.youtube.com/watch?v=CK_PPH1YdYo&feat...


Israeli Water Technology


www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGbX9sLvYys&feat...


Making the Ocean Drinkable


www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_emb...



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2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 8:14PM #5
LeahOne
Posts: 16,305

Jun 10, 2012 -- 4:13PM, Amin21 wrote:


Some of my bigger concerns when it comes to Israel and other nations is the environmental impact of over using mined water resources in Aquifers... in conjunction with over population...


In the book "Secrets of the Sands" the environmental catastrophes of a particular Oasis's 12,000 years of human history.... tell a lot about over use of water and population collapse.


I feel like Israel is way over extending themselves...





This is a very valid concern, Amin - and I'm glad to see that there's oversight to avoid exactly the problem you've cited.  Other techniques are in play as well - like the desalination and the drip watering technology - to prevent the over stressing of the aquifer and collapse of the water table.


I suspect Habesor knows a lot about this technology as well....


'Nemo' is a critter who normally lives in sea anemones, on a coral reef.  How they catch him in the wild, is to dive down with a squirt bottle full of toxic chemicals - cyanide is common - and squirt it at a group of fish.  It's statistically akin to 'fishing' with dynamite - up to 90% of the fish DIE, with 10% being stunned and thus salable.


Most reputable exotic fish venues will not knowingly buy such fish any longer, because of the ecological DISASTER which follows that method of collection - not only dead fish, but dead areas of coral reef.   Not to mention the exploitation of the divers who make only a few pennies compared to the megadollars charged for the fish : (( 


NB:  My son the bio grad has three tanks.  So far he can only afford fresh-water critters:  as you can see, 'Nemo's ' don't come cheap.  buyingnemo.com/Clownfish-Clownfish_c2.ht...

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 10:06PM #6
Amin21
Posts: 4,643

Fair enough,


I myself have wondered why more advanced Desalinization methods are not more common in the mideast. 


I can think of several less common ways that would make mass desalinization more economical... and in the  mideast the scarcity of water itself does this.


Desalinization does have other concerns, like what to do with the salt. It is not a small question, though less an issue than the nuclear waste...


My friend's wife, a micro-biologist has concerns about mass scale desalinization processes.


I am not so knowledgeable.  Israel certainly needs the water and so does everyone else.



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2 years ago  ::  Jun 10, 2012 - 10:54PM #7
LeahOne
Posts: 16,305

Israel has come up with some kind of 'condensation' way to produce fresh water....  they are really working bigtime on finding ways to 'make the desert bloom' which are ecologically benign.  The Saudi desert, like most of Israel, is good fertile soil: it just needs enough water to support a crop.


I think if the Israeli technology were to be used throughout the region, a basic and major source of conflict would be removed from the list - even though climatre change may make the region even more marginal for agriculture.


(The US is pretty unique in having the temperature + soil + rainfall fit for agriculture over a huge portion of our territory:  every other nation is more vulnerable to climatic variations)

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 12, 2012 - 5:32PM #8
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,938

Speaking of water resources and water resource maximization  . . .


Israeli irrigation expert wins World Food Prize
Daniel Hillel is credited with developing drip irrigation methods that conserve water while allowing food to be grown in some of the world’s driest climates
. . .
David Ben-Gurion, the founder and first prime minister of Israel, visited the farm and was so impressed he asked Hillel to take his ideas to Asia, Africa and South America. Hillel said he’s visited as many as 40 different countries during his career.

“We need to learn how to manage land so that it will not degrade and do it efficiently. At the same time, we must maintain natural ecosystems without encroaching upon them without excessive deforestation and destruction of biodiversity,” he said. “All of that is a great concern to me, and I’m devoting my career to it.”
full article:
www.timesofisrael.com/israeli-irrigation...

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