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3 years ago  ::  May 27, 2012 - 10:18PM #1
ted08721
Posts: 3,776

Memorial Day is not actually a day to pray for U.S. troops who died in action but rather a day set aside by Congress to pray for peace. The 1950 Joint Resolution of Congress which created Memorial Day says: "Requesting the President to issue a proclamation designating May 30, Memorial Day, as a day for a Nation-wide prayer for peace." (64 Stat.158).

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3 years ago  ::  May 27, 2012 - 10:21PM #2
teilhard
Posts: 52,218

"Memorial Day" has morphed into a general Ancestor's Day Observance, going out to The Cemetery to decorate Graves, etc. ..

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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 11:42AM #3
amcolph
Posts: 18,265

May 27, 2012 -- 10:18PM, ted08721 wrote:


Memorial Day is not actually a day to pray for U.S. troops who died in action but rather a day set aside by Congress to pray for peace. The 1950 Joint Resolution of Congress which created Memorial Day says: "Requesting the President to issue a proclamation designating May 30, Memorial Day, as a day for a Nation-wide prayer for peace." (64 Stat.158).




Before that it was called "Decoration Day" which was established in 1868 as an occasion to decorate the graves of Civil War dead.

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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 12:23PM #4
loveontheair
Posts: 4,057

Hello,



Ted...



Your lack of *respect is evident not just this post but others you have coined. I believe a apology is in order.


Memorial Day started as the previous poster sited was the Civil War.


" Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces."


Source: Wikipedia




And to all who are serving and have served as I have; to All here on Bnet, thank you for your service.



love


Good works will never produce faith, but faith will always produce good works. loveontheair
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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 12:37PM #5
rabello
Posts: 22,230

I believe the significance of this thread is the little known, or unacknowledged, goal of the resolution, which isn't to decorate graves, watch old war movies, listen to presidents propagandize to and about "the troops" but to pray for peace.  When was the last time we heard a president or leader (besides Dennis Kucinich) hope for/pray for/call for peace?

Black Lives Matter
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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 2:01PM #6
TENAC
Posts: 27,697

I saw this yesterday and thought what an idiot.  CHayes has not disappointed for sure and without questions is getting kudos from the left and far left fringe 'for having the courage" to make such bold statements.  I am sure most of our board leftists faced NYC and saluted when he made these remarks.


I hope he doesnt get fired.  He's good on your team.


Why he felt this a most opportune time to deliver his thoughts and opinons on military heroism I dont know.


VFW Seeks Apology After MSNBC Host's 'Reprehensible and Disgusting' Comments



Didnt want to create a new thread, but thought it fit here.

Moderated by rangerken on May 28, 2012 - 03:23PM
Any man can count the seeds in an apple....
.......but only God can count the apples in the seeds.
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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 3:44PM #7
rangerken
Posts: 16,408

First, we should expect this sort of thing from MSNBC...speaking as a veteran, husband of a veteran, father of a veteran, son of a veteran, and son-in-law of a veteran. I'll just say that I don't expect MSNBC to be on our side!


Second, to all veterans, and most important, to the familes of those veterans who are no longer with us, Happy Memorial day and may your and our honored dead rest in peace.


Ken


PS. And, admittedly but proudly bragging below...!!!!...The veterans in my family and my wife's, only within the close family grouping meaning father, mother, in-laws, brothers, sisters, in-laws, uncles, aunts and first cousins, include...


1 Vice Admiral (passed away), 2 army colonels, 1 navy captain (one passed away), two lieutenant colonels, 1 army (my wife), 1 marine, 1 navy commander (one killed in action), one army major (my father-in-law, passed away) , three captains, 1 army, 1 air force,  1 marine, 1 navy lieutenant senior grade (one killed in action, one now serving), two army lieutenants (now serving), one army first sergeant, 1 senior chief petty officer (one passed away, one now serving), one marine gunnery sergeant, one army staff sergeant (my son), one army sergeant (now serving), 1 navy petty officer third class (my father, passed away), three PFCs, all army (one passed away, one killed in ation, one now serving).


And we have accumulated 1 Navy Cross, 2 Distinguished Service Crosses, Seven Silver Stars, two distinguished flying Crosses, fourteen Purple Hearts, and a whole bunch of Bronze Stars, Air Medals, Meritorious service Medals, and various service Commendation medals.


Libertarian, Conservative, Life member of the NRA and VFW
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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 5:09PM #8
catboxer
Posts: 14,012

Those who died in the service of the United States will surely be remembered today, as they should be.

Less frequently remembered by Americans are the non-combatants killed in the countries the US has warred with since the end of World War II.

About 935,000 Korean civilians died during the Korean War, with higher mortality in the North than the South (www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/korea/kwar.html).

There were roughly a million civilian deaths on both sides of the Vietnam War. That's a moderate-to-conservative estimate; in 1995, the Vietnamese government estimated the civilian death toll at twice that number. (vietnamwar-database.blogspot.com/2010/11...).

It was very difficult to find any statistical information on civilian casualties in Nicaragua and El Salvador during the Reagan interventions of the '80s.

There were fewer civilian deaths during the first Iraq War, known officially as Desert Storm, than in most American expeditionary actions. However, Baghdad was bombed repeatedly, leading to something in excess of 100,000 non-combatant fatalities (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War#Civilian).

The web site Iraq Body count estimates between 107 and 117 thousand civilians died during the second Iraq War of 2003-2011 (www.iraqbodycount.org/).

Although it has lasted longer than the second Iraq War, the war in Afghanistan has been fought at a low level of intensity off and on since 2001 when it began, and has not been as deadly. Still, roughly 50,000 civilians have been killed by belligerents on both sides since the conflict began (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilian_casualtie...(2001–present).  

If we assign Reagan's Central American wars an arbitrary civilian death toll of 50,000 -- actually a conservative estimate -- and add it in with all the other civilian  war death figures above, and keeping in mind that these are rough guesstimates only, then between two and two-and-a-half million civilians have died in American expeditionary conflicts since the end of World War II.

No matter what they turn out to be, these numbers are much higher than the total numbers of American war dead in all these wars.

I believe we should remember the victims of war. I believe we should remember and honor the memory of all of them.

Adepto vestri stercore simul.ttr
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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 5:14PM #9
Unworthyone
Posts: 3,215

I find the response to be somewhat knee jerk.  IMO, it is the same thing as when anyone dares say "I think this war is wrong," and the typical response is "Why do you hate our troops?" or "Why, are you pro-terrorist?"  Disagreeing with a foreign policy that sheds American blood needlessly is certainly not the equivalent of "hating the troops."  It wasn't true during Vietnam, and it isn't true today.


IMO, many politicians on both sides of the aisle have tried to exploit our troops, making them political pawns.   When the politician wants to appear patriotic and strong on foreign policy and national defense, they invoke terms like "heroes" as if just saying the words makes it so. Our citizens who make the ultimate sacrifice in the name of liberty and freedom for the rest of us are heroes, they always have been and always will be.  Politicians who invoke the words to advance their own careers or agendas sully the memory and the honor of that sacrifice.  In this context, "hero" is a sacred word, and it ought not be spoken with anything less than the sincerest humility and utmost respect.


And that is what I think Chris Hayes was trying to say.  Stop using words like "heroes" as some sort of punchline or "justification."

Anyone who thinks sitting in church can make you a Christian must also think that sitting in a garage can make you a car.”
― Garrison Keillor

A friend is someone who will help you move.  A great friend is someone who will help you move - a body!
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3 years ago  ::  May 28, 2012 - 5:42PM #10
TENAC
Posts: 27,697

Each of hte fallen, belonged elsewhere.

Any man can count the seeds in an apple....
.......but only God can count the apples in the seeds.
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