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Switch to Forum Live View Lawyer for Iranian Pastor Sentenced to Death for Being a Christian, Sentenced to Jail
2 years ago  ::  May 14, 2012 - 11:22AM #1
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 16,219
Tell me again about religious freedom in Iran and how Iran is so much better than Irael or the US for religious liberty.

Lawyer for Iranian Pastor Sentenced to Death for Being a Christian, Sentenced to Jail

. . .

Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani was sentenced to death in the Islamic Republic of Iran for the crime of apostasy. He refused to convert back to Islam and recant his faith! The character and courage of Christ is evident in the heroic witness of this Pastor. Now, Mohammad Ali Dadkhah, the lawyer representing this pastor, has been sentenced to nine years in jail.
. . .
Now, Mohammad Ali Dadkhah, the lawyer representing this good pastor, has been sentenced to nine years in jail. He has also been banned from teaching at Universities and practicing law. He is a human rights activist practicing law in a Nation which fails to respect human rights.

He recently told the Guardian Newspaper of the United Kingdom of his ordeal, "I was in a court in Tehran defending one of my clients, Davoud Arjangi, a jailed political activist on death row when the judge told me that my own sentence has been approved and I will be shortly summoned to jail to serve the nine-year sentence."
. . .
full article:
www.catholic.org/international/internati...
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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 6:01AM #2
Dostojevsky
Posts: 7,547

Reading from the link and reading between the lines, there's more to the story.


"A missionary Church known for proclaiming her message to all peoples must necessarily work for the freedom of the faith. She desires to transmit the gift of the truth that exists for one and all. At the same time, she assures peoples and their Governments that she does not wish to destroy their identity and culture by doing so, but to give them, on the contrary, a response which, in their innermost depths, they are waiting for - a response with which the multiplicity of cultures is not lost but instead unity between men and women increases and thus also peace between peoples."


" When asked by the Islamic judges to repent, he stated: "Repent means to return. What should I return to? To the blasphemy that I had before my faith in Christ?".To the religion of your ancestors, Islam," the judge replied. "I cannot," the Christian Pastor said."


He is in an Islamic country in front of the Isalmic Court. What does he expect? The article talks about martyrs for the Church; the times have changed. Islamic countries know that for many  Christians their religion is path to God but also path to political gain. 


To call Islam blasphemy before an Islamic court is madness.


 

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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 9:35AM #3
LeahOne
Posts: 16,402

"He is in an Islamic country in front of the Isalmic Court. What does he expect?"


Dos, what do YOU expect? In the US, a judge may hate that someone refers to Christianity as 'blasphemy' when discussing *their private religious convictions* - but the Law at any level will not tolerate any criminalizing of such a view.  Nor of the view that there is NO Deity - or another GOD, or many.... (And since our beginning, any such 'preference' has been forbidden:  yes, we have not always done right by our Founding Fathers, but we try!)


That is a very different matter from historical Europe and the Middle East where the State is attached to this or that form of religion (how many monarchs have had the title of 'Protector of the Faith'???)   Particularly in the UK where the monarch IS the head of the Church (oh, and in Russia as well, yes?)


In the US and many places, a Court is one of Law - not Religion. 

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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 9:41AM #4
LeahOne
Posts: 16,402

Oh, and Dos? Explain the legal principal by which a court EVER has the right to make suggestions to ANY person about changing their religion.


I suggest that if such can't be located and ID'd - then the 'Court' was a 'kangaroo' and not truly legal.  The proceedings violate all manner of 'international law' and UN resolutions, BTW.

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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 11:32AM #5
Miraj
Posts: 5,021

Sorry, Dos.  There's not a damn thing Islamic about these judges or what they're doing.  Islam is strong enough that it can stand on its own merits without Muslims killing people for converting out of Islam.  If they don't believe in Islam, they never were Muslims anyway.


It is made very clear in the Quran that religious belief is a choice.  Conversion is not an offense against the state; it's only between the individual and God.


May 16, 2012 -- 6:01AM, Dostojevsky wrote:


Reading from the link and reading between the lines, there's more to the story.


"A missionary Church known for proclaiming her message to all peoples must necessarily work for the freedom of the faith. She desires to transmit the gift of the truth that exists for one and all. At the same time, she assures peoples and their Governments that she does not wish to destroy their identity and culture by doing so, but to give them, on the contrary, a response which, in their innermost depths, they are waiting for - a response with which the multiplicity of cultures is not lost but instead unity between men and women increases and thus also peace between peoples."


" When asked by the Islamic judges to repent, he stated: "Repent means to return. What should I return to? To the blasphemy that I had before my faith in Christ?".To the religion of your ancestors, Islam," the judge replied. "I cannot," the Christian Pastor said."


He is in an Islamic country in front of the Isalmic Court. What does he expect? The article talks about martyrs for the Church; the times have changed. Islamic countries know that for many  Christians their religion is path to God but also path to political gain. 


To call Islam blasphemy before an Islamic court is madness.


 





Disclaimer: The opinions of this member are not primarily informed by western ethnocentric paradigms, stereotypes rooted in anti-Muslim/Islam hysteria, "Israel can do no wrong" intransigence, or the perceived need to protect the Judeo-Christian world from invading foreign religions and legal concepts.  By expressing such views, no inherent attempt is being made to derail or hijack threads, but that may be the result.  The result is not the responsibility of this member.


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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 1:29PM #6
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 16,219

Miraj


You have hit on the problem. Islam holds that religion is a matter of choice (if I remember correctly it even says so in the Koran) everywhere but in the countries which call themselves Islamic such as Iran, Egypt, etc... Any explanation for why that is? 

Moderated by Beliefnet_community on Apr 26, 2014 - 09:54PM
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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 10:33PM #7
Dostojevsky
Posts: 7,547

Maybe all of that, but it is clear the Catholic Church is proselitysing (my spell-check is not there) and it may be part of their religion but it is forbidden in some Isalmic countries. There is political undercurrent amongst MOST of the Christian Churches and Iran in this case  knows that. To accept Jesus Christ is to accept western political system. We can say it is not so, but they think it is so and I can't bame them. Bush is a good Christian, isn't he? That is why he is not in Hague.


Therefore let's leave out the western court of law and justice system.


Iran is sitting on the edge after all the threats of a neclear war. Who are they trust. Is this person a spy? No, why not - wouldn't be bellow Christian dignity I am sure.


It is not Christanity's job to change political systems around the world and how their law functions. We have already done too much damage. The person concerned was not judged for running relief shops and visting the sick and giving parcerls of food.  He could have worded it many different ways - I love Chrsitanity because it preaches love and forgiveness for instance. I doubt he would have been imprisoned for that.


And who are we to make a judgment which religion is blasphemous?


Jesus was accused of blasphemy and Christianity is still alive today.


 

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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 11:31PM #8
LeahOne
Posts: 16,402

Dos, so you approve of criminalizing proselytizing then?  Even by Christians?


And what is so terrible about the 'Western' system of law?  It's NOT 'universal from one nation to the next, yanno.


Or do you think it should take the words of two women to 'equal' that of one man in a court of civil law?

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2 years ago  ::  May 16, 2012 - 11:42PM #9
LeahOne
Posts: 16,402

"And who are we to make a judgment which religion is blasphemous?"


Evidently, YOU are capable of believing one or more may be 'blasphemous'.  Certainly you do not speak for me. 


What is a core doctrine of one faith, may well be anathema to other belief systems - but so what? 

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2 years ago  ::  May 17, 2012 - 12:11AM #10
SherriMunnerlyn
Posts: 7,519

May 14, 2012 -- 11:22AM, rocketjsquirell wrote:

Tell me again about religious freedom in Iran and how Iran is so much better than Irael or the US for religious liberty.

Lawyer for Iranian Pastor Sentenced to Death for Being a Christian, Sentenced to Jail

. . .

Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani was sentenced to death in the Islamic Republic of Iran for the crime of apostasy. He refused to convert back to Islam and recant his faith! The character and courage of Christ is evident in the heroic witness of this Pastor. Now, Mohammad Ali Dadkhah, the lawyer representing this pastor, has been sentenced to nine years in jail.
. . .
Now, Mohammad Ali Dadkhah, the lawyer representing this good pastor, has been sentenced to nine years in jail. He has also been banned from teaching at Universities and practicing law. He is a human rights activist practicing law in a Nation which fails to respect human rights.

He recently told the Guardian Newspaper of the United Kingdom of his ordeal, "I was in a court in Tehran defending one of my clients, Davoud Arjangi, a jailed political activist on death row when the judge told me that my own sentence has been approved and I will be shortly summoned to jail to serve the nine-year sentence."
. . .
full article:
www.catholic.org/international/internati...




rocket,


I do not see this story as having to do with religious freedom, the story is about human rights abuses against attorneys who defend persons the state prosecutes. And imprisoning a lawyer because of who he represents is an attack on individual's rights to a fair trial, and Iran has obligations imposed by her treaty obligations under intl law that are being violated here.


This attorney obviously represents many other clients besides the Christian defendant under a death sentence for Apostacy. How do we even know the attorney's sentence relates to his representation of the Christian under a death sentence, as your post title seems to imply?


I am not going to defend Iran's egregious human rights abuses against their political prisoners and their defenders, it is what it is. Basic human rights of individuals inside Iran are under attack.


Sherri

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