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Switch to Forum Live View "Yertle The Turtle" = subversive?
2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 5:40PM #1
Ironhold
Posts: 11,380
A Candian school has banned the book on the basis that it's subversive and encourages revolution.

Really...?

Anyone else think someone might just be over-reacting a bit here?
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 7:38PM #2
catboxer
Posts: 14,012

You can't be too careful these days.


For example, I'm with the Romney campaign, and think we should take a harder line against those dirty reds over there in commie Soviet Russia.

Adepto vestri stercore simul.ttr
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 8:20PM #3
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Apr 26, 2012 -- 5:40PM, Ironhold wrote:

A Candian school has banned the book on the basis that it's subversive and encourages revolution.

Really...?

Anyone else think someone might just be over-reacting a bit here?




Watchit, Seuss and other children's authors will have their works publicly burnt if the the wrong people get into power. We can't have any trace of subversion, now can we?

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 9:55PM #4
withwonderingawe
Posts: 5,073

I use to be able to quote that almost from memory, I love that book. I like Gertrude McFuzzy which accompanies Yertle and then The Big Brag, great stories with good moral messages.


Found this at Wik


“A stack of turtles drawn similarly to those featured in "Yertle the Turtle" first appeared on March 20, 1942, in a cartoon for the New York newspaper PM, where Seuss worked as an editorial cartoonist. The illustration shows two stacks of turtles forming the letter "V" on top of a large turtle labelled "Dawdling Producers", with a caption reading "You Can't Build A Substantial V Out of Turtles!"



Seuss has stated that the titular character Yertle represented Adolf Hitler, with Yertle's despotic rule of the pond and takeover of the surrounding area parallel to Hitler's regime in Germany and invasion of various parts of Europe. In 2003, reporter John J. Miller also compared Yertle to the former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, saying that "[i]ts final lines apply as much to Saddam Hussein as they once did to the European fascists".
Though Seuss made a point of not beginning the writing of his stories with a moral in mind, stating that "kids can see a moral coming a mile off", he was not against writing about issues; he said "there's an inherent moral in any story" and remarked that he was "subversive as hell". "Yertle the Turtle" has variously been described as "autocratic rule overturned", "a reaction against the fascism of World War II", and "subversive of authoritarian rule".



The last lines of "Yertle the Turtle" read: "And turtles, of course ... all the turtles are free / As turtles, and maybe, all creatures should be." When questioned about why he wrote "maybe" rather than "surely", Seuss replied that he didn't want to sound "didactic or like a preacher on a platform", and that he wanted the reader "to say 'surely' in their minds instead of my having to say it."


Guess it is subversive for all the right reasons!

Wise men still seek him.
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