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Switch to Forum Live View No spring for Egypt
2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 4:36PM #1
Erey
Posts: 18,441
Consider my jaw dropped!  This is what the arab spring has become in Egypt?  More outrageous Islamist crappola?  It does not even make sense.
It looks like it is going to pass, these guys dominate egyptian parliment

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2135434...


Egyptian husbands will soon be legally allowed to have sex with their dead wives - for up to six hours after their death.


The controversial new law is part of a raft of measures being introduced by the Islamist-dominated parliament.


It will also see the minimum age of marriage lowered to 14 and the ridding of women's rights of getting education and employment.



TV anchor Jaber al-Qarmouty slammed the notion of letting a husband have sex with his wife after her death under the so-called 'Farewell Intercourse' draft law.


He said: 'This is very serious. Could the panel that will draft the Egyptian constitution possibly discuss such issues? Did Abdul Samea see by his own eyes the text of the message sent by Talawi to Katatni?



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2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 5:18PM #2
JAstor
Posts: 3,957

Apr 26, 2012 -- 4:36PM, Erey wrote:

Consider my jaw dropped!  This is what the arab spring has become in Egypt?  More outrageous Islamist crappola?  It does not even make sense.
It looks like it is going to pass, these guys dominate egyptian parliment

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2135434...


Egyptian husbands will soon be legally allowed to have sex with their dead wives - for up to six hours after their death.


The controversial new law is part of a raft of measures being introduced by the Islamist-dominated parliament.


It will also see the minimum age of marriage lowered to 14 and the ridding of women's rights of getting education and employment.



TV anchor Jaber al-Qarmouty slammed the notion of letting a husband have sex with his wife after her death under the so-called 'Farewell Intercourse' draft law.


He said: 'This is very serious. Could the panel that will draft the Egyptian constitution possibly discuss such issues? Did Abdul Samea see by his own eyes the text of the message sent by Talawi to Katatni?






Obviously, they're not real Muslims. How do I know this? Because if they were real Muslims would they do this?

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 26, 2012 - 6:18PM #3
Miraj
Posts: 5,021
I'm confused. We're told constantly that brainwashed Arabs and Muslims aren't allowed free speech to dissent or oppose their authoritarian ME governments.  Yet, the article says Arabs are speaking out and opposing governments acts. OMG! Is it possible that stuff we've been told here about Arabs and Muslims is crap?
Disclaimer: The opinions of this member are not primarily informed by western ethnocentric paradigms, stereotypes rooted in anti-Muslim/Islam hysteria, "Israel can do no wrong" intransigence, or the perceived need to protect the Judeo-Christian world from invading foreign religions and legal concepts.  By expressing such views, no inherent attempt is being made to derail or hijack threads, but that may be the result.  The result is not the responsibility of this member.


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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 12:58AM #4
habesor
Posts: 5,633

Miraj,


For about the first year and a half, there was a great deal of debate in Iran after the Shah fell. After that, there was a clamp down on free discussion. If the Islamic parties take over in Egypt, how long, if at all, will it be before there is a clamp down on free expression there? 


Habesor

Habesor
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 2:29AM #5
Miraj
Posts: 5,021

Apr 27, 2012 -- 12:58AM, habesor wrote:


Miraj,


For about the first year and a half, there was a great deal of debate in Iran after the Shah fell. After that, there was a clamp down on free discussion. If the Islamic parties take over in Egypt, how long, if at all, will it be before there is a clamp down on free expression there? 


Habesor




I would fail miserably as a fortune teller, mostly because I don't believe in them.  However, Egypt and Iran are two different entities.  Predominantly Shia Iran has a designated clerical class that is considered to be infallible and authoritative, which has stunted political dissent there to a great degree.


Egypt is a work in progress, but, historically it's not been crippled as much by religious doctrine as by social and political doctrines.  That is where the real spheres of influence exist.  It's up to the people to decide who/what wears that crown and what they do with it.  When the social atmosphere is politically confident, modernism takes hold.  When it is weak, feeling challenged, cultural traditions take hold.  At this time, they appear to be in striking opposition to each other.  Time will tell what the outcome will be.

Disclaimer: The opinions of this member are not primarily informed by western ethnocentric paradigms, stereotypes rooted in anti-Muslim/Islam hysteria, "Israel can do no wrong" intransigence, or the perceived need to protect the Judeo-Christian world from invading foreign religions and legal concepts.  By expressing such views, no inherent attempt is being made to derail or hijack threads, but that may be the result.  The result is not the responsibility of this member.


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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 10:12AM #6
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,330

I thought perhaps it would help the discussion if we got a view from Egypt

New setback of the Egyptian freedom of expression

April 26th, 2012 by Editor

The Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR) expresses sorrow for the status of the freedom of expression in Egypt after the revolution. Hesba lawsuits returned to restrict the right of thought, expression and creativity. On April 24, 2012, Haram Misdemeanor Court sentenced the Egyptian famous Actor Adel Imam 3 month and LE 1000 fine for insulting Islam and those who wear galabia and veil within artistic works like Morgan Ahmed Morgan and Toyour Al Zalam movies in addition to Al Zaiem play.

full article:
en.eohr.org/2012/04/26/new-setback-of-th...

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 11:31AM #7
BDboy
Posts: 5,176

Apr 27, 2012 -- 2:29AM, Miraj wrote:


Apr 27, 2012 -- 12:58AM, habesor wrote:


Miraj,


For about the first year and a half, there was a great deal of debate in Iran after the Shah fell. After that, there was a clamp down on free discussion. If the Islamic parties take over in Egypt, how long, if at all, will it be before there is a clamp down on free expression there? 


Habesor




I would fail miserably as a fortune teller, mostly because I don't believe in them.  However, Egypt and Iran are two different entities.  Predominantly Shia Iran has a designated clerical class that is considered to be infallible and authoritative, which has stunted political dissent there to a great degree.


Egypt is a work in progress, but, historically it's not been crippled as much by religious doctrine as by social and political doctrines.  That is where the real spheres of influence exist.  It's up to the people to decide who/what wears that crown and what they do with it.  When the social atmosphere is politically confident, modernism takes hold.  When it is weak, feeling challenged, cultural traditions take hold.  At this time, they appear to be in striking opposition to each other.  Time will tell what the outcome will be.




 


>>>>>>>> yes Egypt is a work in progress and it made a lot of progress in last ten years albeit the world only talks about "Arab Spring" but in business side (Economy) Egypt made some progress.


Predictably because of Arab Spring, Egyptians are talking a pause. It has been a movement driven by economy and religion is just playing a side role.


So far the religious parties shown a lot of maturity in dealing with political stuff and ideas of democracy. I hope they keep this policy and move Egypt forward.




 

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 3:33PM #8
LeahOne
Posts: 16,128

"So far the religious parties shown a lot of maturity in dealing with political stuff and ideas of democracy. I hope they keep this policy and move Egypt forward."


BDBoy, I'd like you to explain how you figure that - given the set of laws which those religious parties have proposed ???


IMO, it's nobody's business what a couple does in the bedroom, but the one law seems to me highly disrespectful of women.  Ditto lowering the 'age of consent' to 14....


I'm curious, BD - have you discussed these proposed laws with any of your female relatives or friends?

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 3:46PM #9
Miraj
Posts: 5,021

Apr 27, 2012 -- 3:33PM, LeahOne wrote:


"So far the religious parties shown a lot of maturity in dealing with political stuff and ideas of democracy. I hope they keep this policy and move Egypt forward."


BDBoy, I'd like you to explain how you figure that - given the set of laws which those religious parties have proposed ???


IMO, it's nobody's business what a couple does in the bedroom, but the one law seems to me highly disrespectful of women.  Ditto lowering the 'age of consent' to 14....


I'm curious, BD - have you discussed these proposed laws with any of your female relatives or friends?




It could have been worded better, so I understand why you're asking, Leah.  I don't think BDBoy was defending the proposed laws, but the political process.

Disclaimer: The opinions of this member are not primarily informed by western ethnocentric paradigms, stereotypes rooted in anti-Muslim/Islam hysteria, "Israel can do no wrong" intransigence, or the perceived need to protect the Judeo-Christian world from invading foreign religions and legal concepts.  By expressing such views, no inherent attempt is being made to derail or hijack threads, but that may be the result.  The result is not the responsibility of this member.


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2 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 3:57PM #10
LeahOne
Posts: 16,128

Ah, you mean BD is suggesting 'maturity' in the sense of *proposing laws* and 'going through channels' to get what the religious parties want to see - rather than demanding and condemning as in other situations?


I didn't really imagine that BD felt those laws represented 'progress', no.  Indeed I hope he didn't!!!

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