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Switch to Forum Live View 1600 Palestinian Prisoners Initiate Hunger Strike To Protest Unlawful Israeli Detentions And...
2 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 11:31PM #21
SherriMunnerlyn
Posts: 7,492

In response to the escalating hunger strikes by the unlawfully held prisoners, Israel enacts yet more egregious and unlawful practices, including denying the dying prisoners salt for their water.


Is the goal to hasten death even sooner?


The places Injustice and maintaining Injustice takes man has no limits, we see this fully illustrated in the Palestinian prisoner hunger strikes and Israel's response to these acts of self sacrifice to oppose injustice.


Barbarism is disclosed, on full display for the  world to see.


” In addition to all personal belongings being confiscated, the IPS also confiscated the hunger-striking prisoners’ only nourishment: salt for their water. Hunger striking prisoners in Nafha prison have also had their salt confiscated, raising serious health concerns for the prisoners engaged in hunger strike. Of the approximately 400 prisoners on hunger strike in Nafha, at least 40 were transferred out of their sections. Hunger strikers in Nafha have also been subjected to fines and electricity was cut in their rooms. On 23 April, six prisoners joined in the hunger strike in Naqab prison and were all immediately placed in solitary confinement. Female prisoner Lina Jarbouni also declared an open hunger strike on 19 April and was taken to solitary confinement on the same day. “


addameer.org/etemplate.php?id=470


Sherri


 

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 29, 2012 - 8:59AM #22
Dostojevsky
Posts: 7,194

Sherri, Israeli prisons and its prisoners have been in the news for while.


Is there some international body like Red Cross and other Human Rights org 


that visits the prisons. I have not heard but there are many things I do not know about....

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 29, 2012 - 1:46PM #23
SherriMunnerlyn
Posts: 7,492

Here is further information about Palestinian political prisoners, all of whom are unlawfully detained under international law.


As of April 1, 2012, the prisoners numbered 4,610, 322 administrative detainees (24 PLC members), female prisoners 6, child prisoners 203 (31 under age 16), Palestinian Legislative Council members 27, East Jerusalem prisoners 153, 1948 Territories prisoners 192, Gaza prisoners 456, prisoners serving life sentences 527, prisoners serving a sentence above 20 years 449, prisoners having served for more than 25 years  23, prisoners having served for more than 20 years, 52.


addameer.org/etemplate.php?id=458


Let us compare this data to number of political prisoners Palestinians hold, 0.


Sherri

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 29, 2012 - 7:25PM #24
LeahOne
Posts: 16,126

That 'comparison' is invidious and invalid.

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2 years ago  ::  May 03, 2012 - 2:26AM #25
Merope
Posts: 9,357

The hunger strike is still going on and garnering increasing national attention.


Reuters reported 2 days ago that the hunger strike by Palestinian prisoners against Israel's jail policies has swollen in weeks from a protest by a handful to a national movement with around 1,400 participants.


Reuters reports that several prisoners are at risk of dying, including Bilal Diab and Thaer Halahlah, both on their 64th day without food, according to their lawyer.  Reuters also reports that 8 other detainees have been hospitalized.


Reuters notes that most hunger strikers joined the fast two weeks ago, demanding an end to administrative detention, restrictive visiting rights,  and limited access to educational materials.


Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has said that his government would refer the issue to the UN, thereby internationalizing a campaign in which all the often-divided and acrimonious Palestinian factions are taking part.


Israeli prisons commissioner Aharon Franco has named a panel to address the hunger strikers' demands.  "The director of prisons communicated that the prison administration would study seriously their demands and will respond to them after a short time," said Qaddoura Fares, chairman of the main Palestinian prisoners's organization.


Sivan Weizman, a spokeswoman for the Israeli Prisons Authority, said the Israeli panel was set up before the hunger strike was launched but confirmed Franco had told prisoners he would review the committee's recommendations.


Israeli authorities say some 1,450 prisoners are on hunger strike. Palestinian sources give varying figures, all well over 1,000.


According to Reuters, there are more than 4,000 Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, of whom around 320 are held in administrative detention.  Many prisoners, however, have been convicted in open proceedings of killing Israeli civilians or plotting attacks.


According to Reuters, prisoners especially resent Israel's "Shalit law," restricting prisoners' access to families and to educational materials as punishment for the harsh, five-year captivity of Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit by Hamas militants.  The law remains in force despite a prisoner swap deal which saw hundreds of Palestinian detainees released in October in exchange for the soldier's freedom.

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2 years ago  ::  May 03, 2012 - 2:54AM #26
Merope
Posts: 9,357

Amira Hass has recently written a piece for Ha'aretz about the hunger strike, observing that for Israelis, punishing Palestinians is not enough. 


She reports that in the infirmary of Ramle Prison, the lives of 4 detainees who have been on a hunger strike for at least 60 days hang in the balance.  She also reports that nearly 2,000 inmates in the Nafha, Ashkelon, Gilboa and other prisons around Israel have been on hunger strike for 2 weeks.


She observes that the Israel Prison Service does not have to make much of an effort to conceal this mass action from Israeli eyes because - in her opinion - the great majority of Israelis label all incarcerated Palestinians as conscienceless murderers or common terrorists, at the least.  She opines that the majority of Israelis have little interest in acts of personal or collective courage on the part of Palestinian detainees that serve as reminders that they are human beings.


Her article notes that when Gilad Shalit was in captivity in Gaza, the cancellation of visits for Gazan prisoners in Israel was put into effect as "proportionate pressure."  Now that he's been released, though, this policy is still in effect.  She writes that Israelis don't care that this sort of proportionality goes on and that family visits have not been restored.  She asks, rhetorically perhaps, why Israelis should care that Palestinians are kept in isolation for years on end and barred from seeing their families for 3, 5 or 10 years.  Additionally, she notes that most prison administrations would welcome prisoners' demands to go back to studying through the Open University, not least because studies reduce stress and tension levels in prison.  But she says the name of the game here is submission.


Hass' piece concludes that Israelis are not satisfied with the various measures to worsen their prison conditions.  The piece says that when it comes to Palestinians, punishment is not enough; that prison must also be never-ending revenge that extends what Israel tries to do outside its walls as well: To break up the collective, to weaken the individual, to deter others from resistance to the foreign regime.    


In her opinion, the hunger strike is, in effect, a protest against these goals. Not all of the Palestinian prisoners have joined the strike.  In prison, as outside of it, Palestinian political and social cohesion has declined, and many of the inmates lack the cultural and social awareness of their predecessors.  Nevertheless, she says, the hunger strike underlines the fundamentally political nature of the collective of Palestinians incarcerated in Israel.                    

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2 years ago  ::  May 03, 2012 - 4:27AM #27
Dostojevsky
Posts: 7,194

Quote:


'Hass' piece concludes that Israelis are not satisfied with the various measures to worsen their prison conditions.  The piece says that when it comes to Palestinians, punishment is not enough; that prison must also be never-ending revenge that extends what Israel tries to do outside its walls as well: To break up the collective, to weaken the individual, to deter others from resistance to the foreign regime.    "


Wouldn't take much to weaken and break this coward.


Give me gas chamber anytime.

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2 years ago  ::  May 03, 2012 - 5:15AM #28
NahumS
Posts: 1,709

I'm no fan of administrative detention - it's an old British measure that Israel extended from the time of the Mandate. It is hardly democratic. I was told by someone who knows more than I do that sometimes it's necessary in order to prevent terror - since an indictment would reveal the methods of information gathering that got the prisoner arrested. It's used against Israelis as well.


Amira Haas has very clear Palestininan bias. While her article is probably factual, you have to sift it for the facts. Nowhere does she describe inhuman conditions. She rightly identifies one of the purposes of incarceration as political - I don't think that this is unjustified. The purpose of punishment is to deter others from similar acts.


Israelis would care more about the welfare of Palestinian prisoners if their "national struggle" was not characterized by brutal violence against civilians.


The simple question is under what conditions the prisoners are being held, and whether the law requires anything else. I'm sure prison isn't a pleasant place, but I doubt that the conditions are truly inhuman.


And speaking of gas chambers, execution would have been quite appropriate for some of the murderers that were released in the Gilad Shalit exchange - and would have prevented releasing so many terrorists. But Israel doesn't do gas chambers or any other capital punishment.


By the way, speaking of political prisoners - hte PA is holding a Palestinian with a death sentence hovering over his head. The crime? Selling land to a Jew.


Where is all the international outcry?


 


 

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2 years ago  ::  May 03, 2012 - 9:32AM #29
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,307

The problem I have with this is the rank hypocrisy. The PA and Hamas also hold people in administrative detention  for political (all of whom are Palestinians) and there is never a word of protest. (Let us not even talk about the practices of the Arab nations surrounding Israel) then we have the problem that the people in the US and Europe who complain loudest about administrative detention in Israel have absolutely no complaints about their own governments which do the same thing.


If administrative detention is problematic, and I submit that it is, then it is problematic everywhere, not just in Israel. To complain about administrative detention only is Israel is hypocritical as well as other things. 

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2 years ago  ::  May 03, 2012 - 12:04PM #30
Merope
Posts: 9,357

Agreed, with both you guys to a large extent, about administrative detention.  I'm uncomfortable with it wherever it's used, including in my own country (the US).  And I think the UK still uses it; certainly it used it in Ireland - and hunger strikes in the Maze were not uncommon or unpublicized.


It's a tough call IMO in Israel now as it was in Ireland then.


 

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