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Switch to Forum Live View Saudi Sports Commentator Al-Raoughui: I'd Rather Be Slaughtered Than See Saudi Women at Olympic Game
2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 10:45AM #1
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,262
Hi again sports fans! Sometimes you just have to shake your head and wonder sbout some people.  It is a shame that no one asked the follow up question to the sports reporter: "Do you watch women's sports in the Olymics?" What do you think? I think he does.  :-)


Saudi Sports Commentator Fahd Al-Raoughui: I'd Rather Have Allah Slaughter Me Than See Saudi Women at the Olympic Games
Line Sport TV (Saudi Arabia) April 3, 2012

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhV1kdYmNJI

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 5:06PM #2
Merope
Posts: 9,343

As of Sunday, and according to Jacques Rogge (president of the International Olympic Committee), the IOC was still talking to Saudi Arabia about sending women to the London Games, despite a report that Saudi Arabia's national Olympic committee resists the idea. 


Rogge's comments came 10 days after a Saudi newspaper reported that national Olympic committee President Prince Nawaf does "not approve" of sending female athletes.  "We're still discussing (this) with our colleague on the Saudi national  Olympic committee. This is an ongoing discussion, but it is a bit too soon to come to conclusions," Rogge said.


More here.


By way of clarification on the bit in the article about Qatar never having included women on its teams, the reason for that is not national policy; it's that none of its competing female athletes has ever qualified for Qatar's Olympic team (for instance, when Qatar hosted the 2006 Asian Games, 43 Qatari women competed but none qualified for the 2008 Beijing Olympics).


Good 2008 article here, by an Egyptian Muslim woman, about Saudi Arabia's stand against women athletes in the 2008 Games.  Haven't looked around the web yet, but I bet we'll find Saudi women pushing back this year, as well.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 5:31PM #3
browbeaten
Posts: 2,945

Apr 17, 2012 -- 5:06PM, Merope wrote:


As of Sunday, and according to Jacques Rogge (president of the International Olympic Committee), the IOC was still talking to Saudi Arabia about sending women to the London Games, despite a report that Saudi Arabia's national Olympic committee resists the idea. 


Rogge's comments came 10 days after a Saudi newspaper reported that national Olympic committee President Prince Nawaf does "not approve" of sending female athletes.  "We're still discussing (this) with our colleague on the Saudi national  Olympic committee. This is an ongoing discussion, but it is a bit too soon to come to conclusions," Rogge said.


More here.


By way of clarification on the the bit in the article about Qatar never having included women on its teams, the reason for that is not national policy; it's that none of its competing female athletes has ever qualified for Qatar's Olympic team (for instance, when Qatar hosted the 2006 Asian Games, 43 Qatari women competed but none qualified for the 2008 Beijing Olympics).


Good 2008 article here, by an Egyptian Muslim woman, about Saudi Arabia's stand against women athletes in the 2008 Games.  Haven't looked around the web yet, but I bet we'll find Saudi women pushing back this year, as well.




Their participation in the Olympic games, sans any women, only tarnishes the spirit of the Olympics.  IMO, they should not be allowed to participate unless their teams included women.




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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 5:35PM #4
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,262

Brow


to be fair there are countries which are not able to field representatives in all sports (sometimes any representatives in more than one sport or more than one representative). This cas be due to their athlete's failing to qualify or due to the fact that they do not have the wherewithall to field teams or individuals. I have no idea how many, if any, Saudi women would be able to qualify for an Olympic spot given the status of women's sports in KSA.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 6:08PM #5
browbeaten
Posts: 2,945

Apr 17, 2012 -- 5:35PM, rocketjsquirell wrote:


Brow


to be fair there are countries which are not able to field representatives in all sports (sometimes any representatives in more than one sport or more than one representative). This cas be due to their athlete's failing to qualify or due to the fact that they do not have the wherewithall to field teams or individuals. I have no idea how many, if any, Saudi women would be able to qualify for an Olympic spot given the status of women's sports in KSA.




Fair enough.  Does anyone know how many Saudi women tried out?


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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 6:28PM #6
Shusha
Posts: 4,341

Try out?  First they will have to gain the right do physical exercise. 

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 7:55PM #7
Merope
Posts: 9,343

I don't know about "trying out" but, yeah, the Saudis may have an Olympics contender in equestrian competition.  She is Dalma Malhas, an equestrian who represented the kingdom at the junior Olympics in Singapore in 2010 - but without official support or recognition.  She came to the games at the invitation of the IOC.  She took the bronze medal in show jumping.


If the Saudi position on NOC participation of female Olympic athletes doesn't budge, and Malhas makes the cut, IOC officials might let her compete by likening her participation in the London Games to the compromise that allowed athletes from Yugoslavia (Serbia-Montenegro) to compete in individual events at the 1992 Olympics.  In Malhas' case, as in the Serbian-Montenegran case, she would compete under the Olympic flag.  


Stories here and here


Indeed, according to April 5th editions of Al-Watan newspaper (an all-but-official government organ), Saudi Olympic Committee president Prince Nawaf Bin-Faisal (a member of the Saudi royal family and the country's sports minister), told a press conference the previous day that "[f]emale Saudi participation will be according to the wishes of students and others living abroad.  All we are doing is to ensure that participation is in the proper framework and in conformity with sharia (Islamic law)."  That apparently has opened some sort of loophole for Saudi women to compete outside the official Saudi delegation.


So it appears that the kingdom won't prevent its female athletes from competing in the Olympics, but it will not officially endorse them.


Not the best or the desired outcome IMO but better than nothing for these athletes - assuming the Saudis don't budge from their current official delegation stance.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2012 - 11:35PM #8
rangerken
Posts: 16,407

My personal choice would be for the Olympic Committee to deny participation to any country that did not allow its female citizens to compete on equal terms with male athletes. Obviously this would have the largest impact on Middle Eastern countries...with the obvious exception of Israel. I'll add that I'd also prefer the Olympic Committee to deny religious based attire by athletes while competing... in other words, no hijabs on women, etc.


The spineless, and often corrupt Olympic poobahs will never do the above of course.


Ken

Libertarian, Conservative, Life member of the NRA and VFW
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2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 4:43AM #9
shmuelgoldstein
Posts: 2,247

Personally, I have no problem if KSA does not want to send female athletes to the Olympics. It's their country, it's their policy.


If the IOC doesn't like that and removes the KSA from competition because of this policy, then it would be a mistake, resulting in not only no female KSA athletes, but also no male athletes as well. Kind of like throwing out the baby with the bath water.  


I will add that the competition in the Olympics for female athletes are conducted under such conditions as to make it extremely immodest, and inappropriate for any woman for whom this is important (I'm thinking not only religious Muslims, but also Orthodox Jewish women). Where I live, when we have activities like this for women, they are for women only, and the men are not allowed to attend. There are many fun activities, from karioke to stand-up shows to sports. For instance my daughter loves her Zumba group, but it's only for girls. That keeps it modest.

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 18, 2012 - 7:15PM #10
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 15,262

Schmuel


That is because of your understanding the concept of modesty which I would argue is incorrect and at varience with tradition. We can discuss this on the DJ board if you would like.

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