Post Reply
Page 4 of 4  •  Prev 1 2 3 4
Switch to Forum Live View Another Great Depression?
3 years ago  ::  Apr 10, 2012 - 11:47PM #31
Swim4fun
Posts: 24

There was always a LOST period after an economic crisis historically. However, peolpe will overcome every great depression driven by boosting the economic developmet. We cannot simply judge whether the great depression is good or bad. By its benefits, every depression refreshes  our soul and forces us to think about the meaning of life; by its nagative side, the depression makes us suffer economically and spiritually. Life will go on no matter what situation we are in. Depression can be treated as a kind of a test on how we love our life.



As for the rising population and dwindling resources, what we can do is being more eco-friendly and borth control. Being more eco-friendly means we must take the environment into consideration every time when we go shopping, dump rubish and do housework. Being a greener people!


Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 11, 2012 - 1:13PM #32
Erey
Posts: 18,940

I agree with the points ArielG has made on the thread.  I don't think we are on this necessary trajectory and humans are very adaptable. 



Vra, I certainly don't think the MIT guys are dolts but you can make a real name for yourself and sell alot of books, speaking engagements, large grants, etc if you make these kinds of doomsday predictions.  There is a self-serving componet to all this.


That does not mean that it is all made up but just that data is interpreted in a certain way that behooves the analyst.  Again, I predict there will be hard times in the future, I am pretty sure I am right but I don't have to be a MIT genius to make this prediction. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 11, 2012 - 2:33PM #33
farragut
Posts: 4,042

Yes, Erey, the point that I think is pertinent is that virtually every day in the business news we can find an expert crying gloom and doom, supporting it with all sorts of data, while yet another is talking of economic boom and supporting it as well.  And occasionally some one prognosticator will turn out to appear correct.

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 11, 2012 - 6:25PM #34
teilhard
Posts: 51,416

"Everything's just fine, fine, fine ... !!! 'Cause I got one Hand in my Pocket, and the other one's hailin' a Taxi Cab ... !!!"


 -- St. Alanis Morrissette


Apr 11, 2012 -- 1:13PM, Erey wrote:


I agree with the points ArielG has made on the thread.  I don't think we are on this necessary trajectory and humans are very adaptable. 



Vra, I certainly don't think the MIT guys are dolts but you can make a real name for yourself and sell alot of books, speaking engagements, large grants, etc if you make these kinds of doomsday predictions.  There is a self-serving componet to all this.


That does not mean that it is all made up but just that data is interpreted in a certain way that behooves the analyst.  Again, I predict there will be hard times in the future, I am pretty sure I am right but I don't have to be a MIT genius to make this prediction. 





Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2012 - 12:40PM #35
TemplarS
Posts: 6,868

There is a dilemma here.


Regarding populations, it seems that countries with advanced/prosperous economies have managed to limit population growth.   The really explosive growth has been in the developing world. So one might think that as (if) the economies of poorer nations develop, population growth (and the pressure on food, water, space) might ease.


But then the problem becomes- what about the higher demands of other resources (primarily energy, but also other materials) necessary to support an advanced economy?


I'm sure we'd all like to see African nations, for example, find a way to prosper- but if they do so at the same per capita fossil fuel consumption as the industrialized west (as is on the road to happening in China), that is surely a recipe for disaster in other ways.


This is why development of alternate energy sources is the single most critical factor here; not even considering the problems associated with global warming.  This, of course, is not a technological challenge at all; if it were, there would be cause for optimism.  It is a political challenge- where there is hardly ever reason to be optimistic.

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2012 - 4:01PM #36
mindis1
Posts: 7,930

Did anyone bother to read the study?


It’s interesting that in 4 pages of posts here, no one has discussed what resources are predicted to be depleted by 2030. What resources do the authors of the study predict will be depleted by 2030? Oil? I haven’t seen any reliable projections that oil will be depleted by 2030. But all fossil fuels that are currently used to produce energy will eventually run out. This is why the US and the rest of the world must invest in good, clean nuclear energy, since solar and wind power will never meet the world’s energy needs even at current consumption.


It is a near certainty that at current rates of overfishing, the oceans will eventually be devoid of life. Of course, this only raises the issue that seems to make most people uncomfortable: the fact that humans need to stop eating the animals. Plant foods, on the other hand, can be grown quite efficiently and rapidly indoors. In fact, not long ago I saw a study of rough calculations showing how little cubic feet--in the form of high rise buildings where plant foods would be grown--and how little energy it would require to feed New York City, which would also basically eliminate the current enormous transportation costs involved in moving food from farm to city. It seems like a good use of space to grow plant foods in some of the post-modern buildings that are just too ugly for humans to occupy. 


I’d say the most pressing ecological threat--and thus threat to human existence--comes not from running out of some resource but from poisoning ourselves. After all, this is happening at epidemic proportions as we speak. For instance, a recent study concluded that of children born in the US in 2000, the rate of autism is 1 in 88 children. This is a 23% rise over the rate for children born in 1998, and a 78% rise over the rate for children born in 1994. We know for a fact that the cause is environmental, not due to a change in genetics.  Taking care of this non-working population from this one disease alone is going to be a burden.


In any case, it is certainly alarmist to try to equate the projected economic effects due to the projected depletion of (as yet unnamed) natural resources with the Great Depression.

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2012 - 6:39PM #37
mountain_man
Posts: 39,703

Apr 12, 2012 -- 4:01PM, mindis1 wrote:

It’s interesting that in 4 pages of posts here, no one has discussed what resources are predicted to be depleted by 2030. ....


Some say we haven't reached peak oil yet, and won't for quite some time. Others say it will happen tomorrow. The truth is probably in the middle.


I’d say the most pressing ecological threat--and thus threat to human existence--comes not from running out of some resource but from poisoning ourselves.


Nuclear power generation would be one of those methods we use to poison ourselves. It's not as "clean" as many are led to believe.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 13, 2012 - 1:22PM #38
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,766

Peak oil has been and gone. Take up bicycling!

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 13, 2012 - 6:18PM #39
teilhard
Posts: 51,416

My native Minnesota is becoming increasingly "Bicycle Friendly" -- EXCEPT for our severe Winter Climate ...


Apr 13, 2012 -- 1:22PM, Karma_yeshe_dorje wrote:


Peak oil has been and gone. Take up bicycling!





Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 10:34PM #40
rangerken
Posts: 16,408

This thread was moved from the Hot Topics Zone

Libertarian, Conservative, Life member of the NRA and VFW
Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 4 of 4  •  Prev 1 2 3 4
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook