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Switch to Forum Live View Egypt Secularists Pull Out of Constituent Assembly
3 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2012 - 12:44PM #1
JAstor
Posts: 3,957

The Islamists in some cases prefer to take over and dominate politically. That's what happened in Lebanon. Now it seems to be happening in Eygpt. 


Egypt secularists pull out of constituent assembly



Liberal and leftist parties have pulled out of a panel drafting Egypt's new constitution, they announced on Tuesday, accusing Islamistsof monopolising the process that will deliver the country's post-revolution charter.


The withdrawals from the panel have pushed the struggle between Islamists and secularists over the issue to crisis point.


"We announce our rejection of the way the constituent assemblywas formed," Ahmed Said, the head of the largest liberal party the Free Egyptians, told reporters.


Last week, the Islamist dominated-parliament voted for the panel to be made up of 50 lawmakers from the upper and lower houses of parliament, and 50 public figures.


But liberals argued that such a high proportion of legislators gave Islamists -- who control nearly three quarters of parliament-- too much control of the constitution.


They also say that having 50 members of the panel outside parliament gives a false guarantee of balance, as voters are free to chose Islamists outside parliament.


"We are talking about the constitution of Egypt, not one for a majority group," Said said during a news conference of key liberal and leftist parties.


With the current make-up, "the constitution will be drafted by political Islam... We refuse to betray the trust of the people," he said.


Ziad Bahaa Eldin, an MP with the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, said members of his party had also withdrawn from the panel, joining several other high profile liberals and leftists.


"This is not a partisan issue. This is about the future of the country and it is the right of all Egyptians to write their constitution... away from any partisan bias," he told reporters.


Moderated by CharikIeia on Mar 27, 2012 - 12:49PM
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 29, 2012 - 10:15PM #2
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

The Kingdom of G-d ( or the kingdom of Heaven) cannot be bought about by the actions of men. 

It is  weak and sinful men who presume to speak for G-d and act on His behalf.


From such, Good Lord deliver us!


Heaven help the small sects who dissent against these religious tyrants.


By the way, it would be as bad if the preachers took over America or the Rabbis took over Israel.

Moderated by Merope on Mar 31, 2012 - 12:18AM
For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 29, 2012 - 10:20PM #3
JAstor
Posts: 3,957

Mar 29, 2012 -- 10:15PM, Roodog wrote:


It is  weak and sinful men who presume to speak for G-d and act on His behalf.


From such, Good Lord deliver us!


Heaven help the small sects who dissent against these religious tyrants.


By the way, it would be as bad if the preachers took over America or the Rabbis took over Israel.




I agree with you, except for the last part. 

Moderated by Merope on Mar 31, 2012 - 12:19AM
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 29, 2012 - 10:25PM #4
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Mar 29, 2012 -- 10:20PM, JAstor wrote:


I agree with you, except for the last part. 


You mean the part about the Rabbis?


I am too acquainted with human weakness and sin to entrust any clergy with absolute power over any given state. Leave governance to the laity!

Moderated by Merope on Mar 31, 2012 - 12:20AM
For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 30, 2012 - 12:01AM #5
habesor
Posts: 5,803

Roodog,


Though I don't mind if a preacher or a rabbi gets elected to a public position in the USA or Israel, I would agree with you that it would not be a good thing if either preachers or rabbis took over in either the USA or Israel.


Habesor

Habesor
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 30, 2012 - 12:10AM #6
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Mar 30, 2012 -- 12:01AM, habesor wrote:


Roodog,


Though I don't mind if a preacher or a rabbi gets elected to a public position in the USA or Israel, I would agree with you that it would not be a good thing if either preachers or rabbis took over in either the USA or Israel.


Habesor





While  clergy men have been elected to office, they do have an obligation to protect the rights of persons not of their sect and be certain that just laws are enacted. My objection is to establishing a state religion in this country, like they had in Europe, where if you did not belong to the state Church you were, until recently, jailed.


President Garfield was a Disciples of Christ minister.

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2012 - 7:04PM #7
JAstor
Posts: 3,957

Coptics Pull Out From Key Egyptian Panel



CAIRO—Egypt's Coptic Church withdrew Monday from an Islamist-dominated committee to draft the nation's new constitution and a leading Christian figure said the minority was never really represented to begin with.


The move fed growing fears that Islamists and the military will end up controlling the most important governmental bodies in post-revolutionary Egypt and minorities, women and the liberal groups that drove last year's uprising will be largely excluded. Out of 100 members of the committee originally selected, there were six Christians, six women and a handful of liberals—disproportionately low numbers.


Yousef Sidhom, editor of the weekly Watani newspaper and a Coptic Church official, said the church never officially put forth any members for the panel selected last week.


"How can we withdraw from something we have not been a part of," he said. "We are calling on people to withdraw along with other groups that have pulled out," Mr. Sidhom added.


The new constitution will determine whether Egypt leans toward more conservative Islam and whether the decades-old system that concentrated power in the hands of the president will be maintained or replaced by an empowered parliament under an Islamist majority.


The Coptic boycott was the latest defection from the vital body, whose work could set the tone for Egypt's government for decades to come. Liberal and secular members and the main Christian church have left the panel, complaining of lack of diversity. The result is that Islamists, a majority on the panel to begin with, have only cemented their hold on the process.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2012 - 7:21PM #8
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 16,786

Jastor


I was just going to post an article on the withdrawal of the Copts. This is not looking good. Looks like there is going to be a silent coup in Egypt and the Radical Islamists (or phoney  Muslims as we now know them to be) are going to take over.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 04, 2012 - 4:52PM #9
JAstor
Posts: 3,957

More bad news for democracy in Egypt...


Egypt Brotherhood hopeful promises clerics a role


CAIRO (AP) — The Muslim Brotherhood's candidate for Egypt's presidency is lobbying hard for support of ultraconservative Muslim clerics, promising them a say over legislation in the future to ensure it is in line with Islamic law, as he tries to rally the divided Islamist vote behind him...


Giving Muslim clerics a direct say over legislation would be unprecedented in Egypt. Specifics of the Brotherhood promise, which Salafi clerics said Wednesday the candidate Khairat el-Shater gave them in a backroom meeting, were not known. But any clerical role would certainly raise a backlash from liberal and moderate Egyptians who already fear Islamists will sharply restrict civil rights as they gain political power after the fall last year of President Hosni Mubarak.


It would also damage the image that the Brotherhood itself promoted for the past year, insisting it does not seek a theocracy in Egypt or to quickly implement Shariah.


El-Shater, a strongman in the Brotherhood, is pushing heavily to prevent a split in the Islamist vote in the May 23-24 vote to elect the first president since Mubarak's ouster. A single Islamist candidate could enjoy a widespread popular base, since the Brotherhood and Salafis together won more than 70 percent of parliament in elections late last year.



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3 years ago  ::  Apr 04, 2012 - 5:00PM #10
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 16,786

JAstor


I am sure that you are as shocked as I am at such a development. Who could possibly have anticipated that an Islamist radical group whose founding principles include a central mandatory role for their form of "conservative" Islam and which insists on Sharia Law ( or at least their version of it) would promise a central role in legislative drafting to "conservative" cleric? Why it was totally unforeseeable. 


Of course the Muslim brotherhood has nothing whatsoever to do with Islam. They just use the name for convenience.

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