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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 8:21PM #11
MMarcoe
Posts: 16,352

I have something better than all this.


A company in Sweden is experimenting with composting human ashes from cremation. Seems like a good idea to me.


If I could die knowing I was fertilizing a crop of basil, it would be a happy exit for me.

There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.

God is just a personification of reality, of pure objectivity.
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 8:47PM #12
Stardove
Posts: 15,369

Dec 4, 2011 -- 6:56PM, mountain_man wrote:


Dec 4, 2011 -- 5:48PM, rocketjsquirell wrote:

Putting aside my reservations about cremation, I think it is a great idea, why waste resources?


It takes a lot of gas to cremate a human body, far more than the body itself contributes to the process. It's that left over heat that would be use.


Good idea..... but of course.... I have a better one; a natural burial. That would be just the body, no casket, no embalming, if desired a biodegradable paper bag, and that's it. An RFID tag would be place in the grave, but no other marker of any kind. If appropriate to the location, a tree may be planted and you can fertilize the tree as you decay.


It appears I'm not the only one with this idea; here's more info.


I was going to be cremated, but I like this better. It feels more like it completes the cycle.



The only issue I see with eco burial, so there are not that many places which will allow this type of burial.  Most city codes are not going to let this happen.  Bodies which are not embalmed have to be buried quickly with no viewing (here anyway). 


I did have one great-great uncle Joe Cole who was buried on his own land, but he was in a coffin.  We walked a mile following an old covered wagon carrying his coffin from the road to the oak tree where he was buried.  We did have a moment where we thought his coffin was coming off that wagon! (see the link)


I've told my children to cremate my body and make some jewelry out of the small bones. Surprised


BUT NOT TILL I'M DEAD!

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 10:00PM #13
mountain_man
Posts: 39,283

Dec 4, 2011 -- 8:47PM, Stardove wrote:

The only issue I see with eco burial, so there are not that many places which will allow this type of burial.  Most city codes are not going to let this happen.  Bodies which are not embalmed have to be buried quickly with no viewing (here anyway).


In many places it is perfectly fine. Maybe not for an in town cemetery, but out in the country, there should be no problem. If short term preservation is needed, they can use ecofriendly, biodegradable, embalming fluids. And the cemetery doesn't have to be just for that one use. Out where I live there are thousands of acres of grazing land that would be perfect.


I did have one great-great uncle Joe Cole who was buried on his own land, but he was in a coffin.  We walked a mile following an old covered wagon carrying his coffin from the road to the oak tree where he was buried.  We did have a moment where we thought his coffin was coming off that wagon! (see the link)


I've told my children to cremate my body and make some jewelry out of the small bones.

BUT NOT TILL I'M DEAD!


I was going to be cremated, but I think I'll change that to an eco burial. Edward Abby had it right; "He wanted his body transported in the bed of a pickup truck. He wanted to be buried as soon as possible. He wanted no undertakers. No embalming, for Godsake. No coffin. Just an old sleeping bag... Disregard all state laws concerning burial. "I want my body to help fertilize the growth of a cactus or cliff rose or sagebrush or tree." said the message." Source.



Anyway, the wisest of all sages, Anonymous once quipped; "The dead should not take room from the living." I agree.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 10:06PM #14
karbie
Posts: 3,329

Or you could skip all of these and will your body to Science...


My family knows my wishes--first, that no drastic measures be used to keep me alive; that everything someone else can use be harvested, then cremation.  I figure that after I've been cremated everyone who wanted a piece of me at the same time can have it; and if possilbe I'd like the rest to fertilize the lilac bush in my childhood home's back yard. If not, my sister has a lilac bush in her backyard.


My uncle's best friend from birth to grave was cremated with a memorial service; so were my aunt and uncle. They kept her alive just long enough to harvest her organs; she'd suffered a massive stroke that made her chances of ever waking up-or waking up as herself -impossible. She'd left instructions on where she wanted her remains scattered, and it's a safe bet my uncle ended up being scattered at the same place.


If her grave site hadn't already been paid for and the marker only awaiting the final date to be added, Mother would be cremated  herself; my sister and her husband will both be cremated and can have their remains set in one plot. She says having a memorial service with a reception afterward--the old-time Irish wake condensed-is much, much easier on the family.


The cemetery where most of my family is only accepts flat grave markers because it is easier (cheaper) maintenance when you can just have a lawn tractor mow the grass. They have above ground crypts as well, but all that does is give people a place to cry. None of us stick by our mortal remains are counting whether or not our descendants come and bring flowers.


The year after my Grandpa died, I had a very strong urge to leave him something he would have appreciated more than flowers--the core of a watermelon. He'd talked to us once about the best melons were the ones he and some of the other boys at the orphanage stole out of farms. If they were caught, they had to work at the farm to pay for what they ate. He got flowers--but my suggestion made both my mother and Grandma laugh. They both agreed with me that he would have loved it, but the maintenance people wouldn't.


That's what the funeral industry and cemeteries have given us--high costs for funeral and burial, and making sure that the "Eternal Care" doesn't cost them too much for upkeep.So I guess cheating them out of as many fees as possible sounds good. They can take out my teeth for future scientist can guess what my life was a hundred years from now. that takes care of the mercury emissions, and on my way out, I will have a "hot body" one last time.

"You are letting your opinion be colored by facts again."
'When I want your opinion, I'll give it to you."
these are both from my father.
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 10:28PM #15
Ebon
Posts: 10,148

Dec 4, 2011 -- 6:56PM, mountain_man wrote:

If appropriate to the location, a tree may be planted and you can fertilize the tree as you decay.



I really like that idea. Gives your loved ones somewhere nice to come if they want to visit your grave and contributes to the cycle of life. One could even include one of the cardboard caskets now being used over here (Grimmer was cremated in one).


To the OP: I have much the same burial plans I've had for years. Firstly, donate anything that might be remotely useful to appropriate bodies (forgive the pun). Secondly, dump me in the ground or cremate me. Thirdly, leave some kind of marker so that my loved ones will (hopefully) have someplace nice to come and remember me (under a tree planted on my grave would be ideal).The body is merely a temporary container for the soul so I don't much care what happens to it once I'm no longer occupying it.



That said, please consider this a plea for everyone whose faith or cultural traditions allow it to sign up for organ donation. You're not going to be using your heart, lungs or eyes once you're dead but the living are still in desperate need of them. Your doctors will NOT let you die to harvest your organs, that's just a stupid urban legend but wouldn't you like to know that even as you shuffle off this mortal coil, you can help someone else live, help a blind man see, give someone the gift of life? Life is precious, life is fragile and life is too easily ended. If you never listened to another word I wrote, listen to this and I'll be happy.


www.uktransplant.org.uk/ukt/how_to_becom... (UK organ donor register)


organdonor.gov/ (US organ donor register)


Anyone from another country, message me and I'll be overjoyed to help you find your local register.

He who oppresses the poor shows contempt for their Maker, but whoever is kind to the needy honors God. ~ Proverbs 14:31

Fiat justitia, ruat caelum

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 10:36PM #16
mainecaptain
Posts: 21,783

Dec 4, 2011 -- 10:28PM, Ebon wrote:


Dec 4, 2011 -- 6:56PM, mountain_man wrote:

If appropriate to the location, a tree may be planted and you can fertilize the tree as you decay.



I really like that idea. Gives your loved ones somewhere nice to come if they want to visit your grave and contributes to the cycle of life. One could even include one of the cardboard caskets now being used over here (Grimmer was cremated in one).


To the OP: I have much the same burial plans I've had for years. Firstly, donate anything that might be remotely useful to appropriate bodies (forgive the pun). Secondly, dump me in the ground or cremate me. Thirdly, leave some kind of marker so that my loved ones will (hopefully) have someplace nice to come and remember me (under a tree planted on my grave would be ideal).The body is merely a temporary container for the soul so I don't much care what happens to it once I'm no longer occupying it.



That said, please consider this a plea for everyone whose faith or cultural traditions allow it to sign up for organ donation. You're not going to be using your heart, lungs or eyes once you're dead but the living are still in desperate need of them. Your doctors will NOT let you die to harvest your organs, that's just a stupid urban legend but wouldn't you like to know that even as you shuffle off this mortal coil, you can help someone else live, help a blind man see, give someone the gift of life? Life is precious, life is fragile and life is too easily ended. If you never listened to another word I wrote, listen to this and I'll be happy.


www.uktransplant.org.uk/ukt/how_to_becom... (UK organ donor register)


organdonor.gov/ (US organ donor register)


Anyone from another country, message me and I'll be overjoyed to help you find your local register.




Pretty much covers my feelings as well.


And I would love being under a tree. I love trees.

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side. Aristotle
Never discourage anyone...who continually makes progress, no matter how slow. Plato..
"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives" Jackie Robinson
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 11:30PM #17
Wanderingal
Posts: 5,504

Amen amen on the organ donation.


And after that if you really want an all natural body disposal get sent out to the desert here and left above ground--dessication in a very few days depending on the season--and providing nourishment for a wide variety of organisms from the microscopic on up the chain alll the way to scavengers including eagles and hawks to feed their offspring.


That's one way-in addition to organ donation--to insure that even your physical body will live on and contribute to the contiuning flow of life......This is the way some Native American Peoples "bury" their dead. It is also a custom among some India Indian Peoples.


 (This would mean no embalming--all natural--get packed in dry ice for the trip to the desert.)

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 11:33PM #18
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Dec 4, 2011 -- 10:36PM, mainecaptain wrote:


Dec 4, 2011 -- 10:28PM, Ebon wrote:


Dec 4, 2011 -- 6:56PM, mountain_man wrote:

If appropriate to the location, a tree may be planted and you can fertilize the tree as you decay.



I really like that idea. Gives your loved ones somewhere nice to come if they want to visit your grave and contributes to the cycle of life. One could even include one of the cardboard caskets now being used over here (Grimmer was cremated in one).


To the OP: I have much the same burial plans I've had for years. Firstly, donate anything that might be remotely useful to appropriate bodies (forgive the pun). Secondly, dump me in the ground or cremate me. Thirdly, leave some kind of marker so that my loved ones will (hopefully) have someplace nice to come and remember me (under a tree planted on my grave would be ideal).The body is merely a temporary container for the soul so I don't much care what happens to it once I'm no longer occupying it.



That said, please consider this a plea for everyone whose faith or cultural traditions allow it to sign up for organ donation. You're not going to be using your heart, lungs or eyes once you're dead but the living are still in desperate need of them. Your doctors will NOT let you die to harvest your organs, that's just a stupid urban legend but wouldn't you like to know that even as you shuffle off this mortal coil, you can help someone else live, help a blind man see, give someone the gift of life? Life is precious, life is fragile and life is too easily ended. If you never listened to another word I wrote, listen to this and I'll be happy.


www.uktransplant.org.uk/ukt/how_to_becom... (UK organ donor register)


organdonor.gov/ (US organ donor register)


Anyone from another country, message me and I'll be overjoyed to help you find your local register.




Pretty much covers my feelings as well.


And I would love being under a tree. I love trees.




I'll be under a tree--already bought the plot next to my husband's grave. We had been married 40 years when he died. I still have a single red rose from the garland that covered his casket. I'm sure my funeral and burial will be tradtional Christian--fitting for me and our family.




 

discuss catholicism
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 04, 2011 - 11:42PM #19
mountain_man
Posts: 39,283

Dec 4, 2011 -- 10:28PM, Ebon wrote:

....That said, please consider this a plea for everyone whose faith or cultural traditions allow it to sign up for organ donation...


Of course, all this is to be done after organ donation if that's OK with the persons beliefs/desires.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 05, 2011 - 1:35AM #20
rangerken
Posts: 16,406

Good point about organ donation. In Massachusetts we can indicate on our drivers licenses that we are organ donors, which I have done. I should have added that to my admittedly smart ass remarks.


Ken

Libertarian, Conservative, Life member of the NRA and VFW
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