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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 4:31PM #1
Merope
Posts: 9,761

The Christian Science Monitor is reporting that raging wildfires destroyed more than 1,000 homes in Texas over the weekend.  Thousands of residents were evacuated from the most threatened areas.  Ten new fires labeled "large" by the Texas Forest Service cropped up Monday night across the state.

Bastrop County has been particularly hard hit this weekend.  Some of our members and their families have been seriously affected by the Bastrop County fire.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to them.


Twenty-five miles east of Austin, the state's second most popular destination for economic transplants from other states, Bastrop County is known as a film shoot location for Texas-flavored movies like The Alamo and as a redoubt of homes set on large, rural lots.  Along with its central location, its idyllic setting has helped drive up the county's population by 30% in the past 10 years.


Some 5,000 people were evacuated ahead of the fire, which continues to burn unabated today.  By latest count, more than 600 homes have been destroyed there.


This weekend's fire damage is estimated to be $100 million, according to the Insurance Council of Texas.  The toll in Bastrop County is the largest such claim from a single fire in Texas history.


Fanned by 40 mph wind bands from Tropical Storm Lee, firefighters had to step aside and let the fires rage into residential areas.  Today, firefighters are using the lull to try to get the upper hand on some 85 fires still burning throughout the state, with special emphasis on fires like the Bastrop County blaze lurking near populated areas.


The linked article raises questions about whether urban sprawl is colliding with Mother Nature to the extent that homes and housing developments are being built where they should not be.

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 4:49PM #2
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
I don't know that building homes in inadvisable locations is the problem with these fires as much as extreme drought and very high summer temperatures over the past several years.

Prairie fires are always a possibility in areas as naturally dry and wideopen as Texas and the states north of it are.

It's not at all rare for wildfires to start and spread rapidly and pretty much unobstructed until extinguished or the fire simply runs out of fuel. That's a reality that people hope won't happen in their lifetime despite awareness that it can.
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 4:55PM #3
Ironhold
Posts: 11,514

The actual reason why we're having so much trouble is due to the fact that we're having one of the worst droughts on record, meaning that much of the vegetation around here is little more than kindling.


Truth is, down here at Ft. Hood range fires are a common sight even under normal weather conditions; at least once a month something goes wrong during training and a spark goes off. As such, I'm used to the sight of smoke in the skyline over the base.

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 5:19PM #4
Erey
Posts: 18,662

yes the drought is terrible, very little rain this summer in a place that normally gets alot of rain. 


I keep scanning the forcast hoping for rain.  At least it is not as hot anymore. 

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 5:31PM #5
Merope
Posts: 9,761

Sep 6, 2011 -- 4:55PM, Ironhold wrote:


The actual reason why we're having so much trouble is due to the fact that we're having one of the worst droughts on record, meaning that much of the vegetation around here is little more than kindling.



Sep 6, 2011 -- 5:19PM, Erey wrote:


yes the drought is terrible, very little rain this summer in a place that normally gets alot of rain. 


I keep scanning the forcast hoping for rain.  At least it is not as hot anymore. 




Understood about the drought.  It sucks that Lee brought only wind bands but no rain :-(




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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 5:36PM #6
Merope
Posts: 9,761

Here's a view of the Bastrop Fire from NASA:  kutnews.org/post/view-bastrop-fire-space....


Among other things, it shows smoke stretching from Central Texas all the way down to the Gulf Coast.

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 10:21PM #7
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Drought and fire are usually seen as signs of divine displeasure:


Could God be pissed at Rick Perry?

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 10:23PM #8
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Sep 6, 2011 -- 10:21PM, Roodog wrote:


Drought and fire are usually seen as signs of divine displeasure:


Could God be pissed at Rick Perry?




Made me laugh !!!!

discuss catholicism
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 07, 2011 - 1:16AM #9
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,571

Bachmann made similar remarks and got castigated by the libs...

"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 07, 2011 - 4:27AM #10
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
Yes, but unlike Bachmann, Roodog was clearly poking fun at some politicians (and televangelists) for doing so.
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