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Switch to Forum Live View The Morning After EMP
3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 7:09PM #1
Paravani
Posts: 797



...  You wake up in the middle of the night, or maybe it's early morning -- you can't tell how early, but you know that your alarm hasn't gone off yet, and you wonder what woke you.  It's midwinter, and your bedroom is cold and dark.
 
"Hm, power must be off," you think, because you can't see your lighted clock radio.  You reach for your cell phone to check the time, but its screen is dark, too, and it won't power up no matter how many times you push the power button. 

You curse yourself for not having put your phone on the charger last night, as you stumble out of bed and pull back the curtains, observing that it's pitch black outside as well.  The street lights are out, the neighbors' houses are all dark, and there isn't any traffic on the street.  There's no distant glow from town, no light coming from any nearby neighborhood, either...  and you suddenly notice that it's eerily quiet, as well.  You live close to the freeway, and even in the middle of the night you can always hear some cars and trucks roaring in the distance; but now there's nothing.  Not a sound breaks the dark stillness of the night. 

Something about the silence frightens you, so you feel your way to the desk where you keep your laptop.  It was left on the charger last night, powered down so the battery would be fresh and ready to go this morning.  (Is it morning?)  You open the screen and press the power button -- nothing happens.  You press it again; still no response.

There's a funny smell in the air, like ozone and burnt plastic.

It's cold, so you head to the kitchen for your emergency candles.  You turn a knob on the gas stove, but it doesn't light.  You feel the stove -- ah, the pilot light has gone out.  So you light a match and turn the burner on again, but nothing happens, and you realize you can't hear the soft hiss of gas, nor can you smell any gas. 

You curse again.  Dammit, does everything have to go on the blink all at once this morning?  Why isn't anything working?!!

You get yourself a glass of water -- at least that's still working -- and decide to take a shower before the hot water heater goes completely cold.  Whatever knocked out the gas and the power must have happened within the last hour or two, because your hot water is still warm.  You dress for work by candlelight and go to the garage to get your car, thinking that maybe you can find out what's going on if you drive around a bit. 

You hop in your car and turn the key in the ignition, and nothing happens -- the starter doesn't catch, the engine doesn't turn over, nothing.  The key makes a mechanical click, that's all.

"That was a brand-new battery," you think.  "I swear, I've never had such a run of bad luck all on one day!"

So you leave your house by the front door instead of the garage door, walking instead of driving.  The air is brisk but clear, and the stars look brighter than you've ever seen them...  as bright as if they were the only light in the world...

Which effectively, they are.

The eastern horizon is beginning to brighten, signaling the break of day, but still the streets are eerily quiet.  You walk up your block to the nearest arterial.  A few cars are haphazardly parked on the side of the road, as if their drivers had just steered them as far as they could go without power and left them there.  There are more cars and a few trucks parked at the intersection as if waiting for the light to change; most are empty and still, but you see one woman napping at the wheel of her Chevrolet. 

You rap at the window and she startles awake.

"What happened?" you ask.

"I don't know," she says through the closed window.  "We were all waiting at the light, and there was this flash -- like lightning, I think.  And then all the lights went out and the engines stopped running.  We stood around for a while, talking...  but it was too cold for me to stay outside, and I'm too far from home to walk in the dark...  so here I am." 

A worried look crosses her face as she wonders if that was too much to tell a complete stranger.  She's lost and alone without her car and cell phone...  her husband is many miles away, waiting for her to come home from her job bartending...  He must be worried by now.

"Is your phone working?" she asks.  "I need to call my husband."

"No, I'm sorry, my phone isn't working, either," you say.


Before the Lights Go Out:   A Survey of EMP Preparedness Reveals Significant Shortfalls



The most frightening aspect of an EMP bomb is how cheap and easy it is to make one. 

From the viewpoint of a hostile terrorist nation like Iran, the most difficult aspect of an EMP attack on the US is delivery, and the choice:  Do you attempt to launch only a few large nuclear E-bomb ICBMs into the airspace above the east and west coasts from container ships safely located in international waters?  Or do you coordinate a dozen or so smaller vigilante attacks using smaller, non-nuclear EMP bombs that are cheap and easy to make with readily-available supplies?

Either method would effectively cripple our nation for at least many months, more probably years, and potentially send us back to the eighteenth century, causing widespread famine, disease, and chaos.

Iran, which is now a nuclear nation, in 2004 was observed practicing launching SCUD missiles from ocean-based carriers.  The missiles were detonated at the height of their trajectory, which is where EMP-bombs are most effective.  (The higher they are when they explode, the more damage they can do over a wider distance).

Without going into dangerous detail, I'll just say that I can personally think of six other ways from Sunday that our nation could be suddenly and very effectively attacked, with no warning and no simple way for our Homeland Security to prevent an EMP attack.

In short, it is our greatest vulnerability, not least because we are completely unprepared for it.
 
Next post:  What is EMP?  How to recognize it if it happens, what to do, and how to prepare for it.

Love,

-- Claudia

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 8:05PM #2
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Aug 26, 2011 -- 7:09PM, Paravani wrote:




...  You wake up in the middle of the night, or maybe it's early morning -- you can't tell how early, but you know that your alarm hasn't gone off yet, and you wonder what woke you.  It's midwinter, and your bedroom is cold and dark.
 
"Hm, power must be off," you think, because you can't see your lighted clock radio.  You reach for your cell phone to check the time, but its screen is dark, too, and it won't power up no matter how many times you push the power button. 

You curse yourself for not having put your phone on the charger last night, as you stumble out of bed and pull back the curtains, observing that it's pitch black outside as well.  The street lights are out, the neighbors' houses are all dark, and there isn't any traffic on the street.  There's no distant glow from town, no light coming from any nearby neighborhood, either...  and you suddenly notice that it's eerily quiet, as well.  You live close to the freeway, and even in the middle of the night you can always hear some cars and trucks roaring in the distance; but now there's nothing.  Not a sound breaks the dark stillness of the night. 

Something about the silence frightens you, so you feel your way to the desk where you keep your laptop.  It was left on the charger last night, powered down so the battery would be fresh and ready to go this morning.  (Is it morning?)  You open the screen and press the power button -- nothing happens.  You press it again; still no response.

There's a funny smell in the air, like ozone and burnt plastic.

It's cold, so you head to the kitchen for your emergency candles.  You turn a knob on the gas stove, but it doesn't light.  You feel the stove -- ah, the pilot light has gone out.  So you light a match and turn the burner on again, but nothing happens, and you realize you can't hear the soft hiss of gas, nor can you smell any gas. 

You curse again.  Dammit, does everything have to go on the blink all at once this morning?  Why isn't anything working?!!

You get yourself a glass of water -- at least that's still working -- and decide to take a shower before the hot water heater goes completely cold.  Whatever knocked out the gas and the power must have happened within the last hour or two, because your hot water is still warm.  You dress for work by candlelight and go to the garage to get your car, thinking that maybe you can find out what's going on if you drive around a bit. 

You hop in your car and turn the key in the ignition, and nothing happens -- the starter doesn't catch, the engine doesn't turn over, nothing.  The key makes a mechanical click, that's all.

"That was a brand-new battery," you think.  "I swear, I've never had such a run of bad luck all on one day!"

So you leave your house by the front door instead of the garage door, walking instead of driving.  The air is brisk but clear, and the stars look brighter than you've ever seen them...  as bright as if they were the only light in the world...

Which effectively, they are.

The eastern horizon is beginning to brighten, signaling the break of day, but still the streets are eerily quiet.  You walk up your block to the nearest arterial.  A few cars are haphazardly parked on the side of the road, as if their drivers had just steered them as far as they could go without power and left them there.  There are more cars and a few trucks parked at the intersection as if waiting for the light to change; most are empty and still, but you see one woman napping at the wheel of her Chevrolet. 

You rap at the window and she startles awake.

"What happened?" you ask.

"I don't know," she says through the closed window.  "We were all waiting at the light, and there was this flash -- like lightning, I think.  And then all the lights went out and the engines stopped running.  We stood around for a while, talking...  but it was too cold for me to stay outside, and I'm too far from home to walk in the dark...  so here I am." 

A worried look crosses her face as she wonders if that was too much to tell a complete stranger.  She's lost and alone without her car and cell phone...  her husband is many miles away, waiting for her to come home from her job bartending...  He must be worried by now.

"Is your phone working?" she asks.  "I need to call my husband."

"No, I'm sorry, my phone isn't working, either," you say.


Before the Lights Go Out:   A Survey of EMP Preparedness Reveals Significant Shortfalls



The most frightening aspect of an EMP bomb is how cheap and easy it is to make one. 

From the viewpoint of a hostile terrorist nation like Iran, the most difficult aspect of an EMP attack on the US is delivery, and the choice:  Do you attempt to launch only a few large nuclear E-bomb ICBMs into the airspace above the east and west coasts from container ships safely located in international waters?  Or do you coordinate a dozen or so smaller vigilante attacks using smaller, non-nuclear EMP bombs that are cheap and easy to make with readily-available supplies?

Either method would effectively cripple our nation for at least many months, more probably years, and potentially send us back to the eighteenth century, causing widespread famine, disease, and chaos.

Iran, which is now a nuclear nation, in 2004 was observed practicing launching SCUD missiles from ocean-based carriers.  The missiles were detonated at the height of their trajectory, which is where EMP-bombs are most effective.  (The higher they are when they explode, the more damage they can do over a wider distance).

Without going into dangerous detail, I'll just say that I can personally think of six other ways from Sunday that our nation could be suddenly and very effectively attacked, with no warning and no simple way for our Homeland Security to prevent an EMP attack.

In short, it is our greatest vulnerability, not least because we are completely unprepared for it.
 
Next post:  What is EMP?  How to recognize it if it happens, what to do, and how to prepare for it.

Love,

-- Claudia




Crikey, Claudia


Something will get me/us. I will NOT live in constant fear or weird preparedness.


J.




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3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 8:19PM #3
Roodog
Posts: 10,168

Aug 26, 2011 -- 7:09PM, Paravani wrote:




...  You wake up in the middle of the night, or maybe it's early morning -- you can't tell how early, but you know that your alarm hasn't gone off yet, and you wonder what woke you.  It's midwinter, and your bedroom is cold and dark.
 
"Hm, power must be off," you think, because you can't see your lighted clock radio.  You reach for your cell phone to check the time, but its screen is dark, too, and it won't power up no matter how many times you push the power button. 

You curse yourself for not having put your phone on the charger last night, as you stumble out of bed and pull back the curtains, observing that it's pitch black outside as well.  The street lights are out, the neighbors' houses are all dark, and there isn't any traffic on the street.  There's no distant glow from town, no light coming from any nearby neighborhood, either...  and you suddenly notice that it's eerily quiet, as well.  You live close to the freeway, and even in the middle of the night you can always hear some cars and trucks roaring in the distance; but now there's nothing.  Not a sound breaks the dark stillness of the night. 

Something about the silence frightens you, so you feel your way to the desk where you keep your laptop.  It was left on the charger last night, powered down so the battery would be fresh and ready to go this morning.  (Is it morning?)  You open the screen and press the power button -- nothing happens.  You press it again; still no response.

There's a funny smell in the air, like ozone and burnt plastic.

It's cold, so you head to the kitchen for your emergency candles.  You turn a knob on the gas stove, but it doesn't light.  You feel the stove -- ah, the pilot light has gone out.  So you light a match and turn the burner on again, but nothing happens, and you realize you can't hear the soft hiss of gas, nor can you smell any gas. 

You curse again.  Dammit, does everything have to go on the blink all at once this morning?  Why isn't anything working?!!

You get yourself a glass of water -- at least that's still working -- and decide to take a shower before the hot water heater goes completely cold.  Whatever knocked out the gas and the power must have happened within the last hour or two, because your hot water is still warm.  You dress for work by candlelight and go to the garage to get your car, thinking that maybe you can find out what's going on if you drive around a bit. 

You hop in your car and turn the key in the ignition, and nothing happens -- the starter doesn't catch, the engine doesn't turn over, nothing.  The key makes a mechanical click, that's all.

"That was a brand-new battery," you think.  "I swear, I've never had such a run of bad luck all on one day!"

So you leave your house by the front door instead of the garage door, walking instead of driving.  The air is brisk but clear, and the stars look brighter than you've ever seen them...  as bright as if they were the only light in the world...

Which effectively, they are.

The eastern horizon is beginning to brighten, signaling the break of day, but still the streets are eerily quiet.  You walk up your block to the nearest arterial.  A few cars are haphazardly parked on the side of the road, as if their drivers had just steered them as far as they could go without power and left them there.  There are more cars and a few trucks parked at the intersection as if waiting for the light to change; most are empty and still, but you see one woman napping at the wheel of her Chevrolet. 

You rap at the window and she startles awake.

"What happened?" you ask.

"I don't know," she says through the closed window.  "We were all waiting at the light, and there was this flash -- like lightning, I think.  And then all the lights went out and the engines stopped running.  We stood around for a while, talking...  but it was too cold for me to stay outside, and I'm too far from home to walk in the dark...  so here I am." 

A worried look crosses her face as she wonders if that was too much to tell a complete stranger.  She's lost and alone without her car and cell phone...  her husband is many miles away, waiting for her to come home from her job bartending...  He must be worried by now.

"Is your phone working?" she asks.  "I need to call my husband."

"No, I'm sorry, my phone isn't working, either," you say.


Before the Lights Go Out:   A Survey of EMP Preparedness Reveals Significant Shortfalls



The most frightening aspect of an EMP bomb is how cheap and easy it is to make one. 

From the viewpoint of a hostile terrorist nation like Iran, the most difficult aspect of an EMP attack on the US is delivery, and the choice:  Do you attempt to launch only a few large nuclear E-bomb ICBMs into the airspace above the east and west coasts from container ships safely located in international waters?  Or do you coordinate a dozen or so smaller vigilante attacks using smaller, non-nuclear EMP bombs that are cheap and easy to make with readily-available supplies?

Either method would effectively cripple our nation for at least many months, more probably years, and potentially send us back to the eighteenth century, causing widespread famine, disease, and chaos.

Iran, which is now a nuclear nation, in 2004 was observed practicing launching SCUD missiles from ocean-based carriers.  The missiles were detonated at the height of their trajectory, which is where EMP-bombs are most effective.  (The higher they are when they explode, the more damage they can do over a wider distance).

Without going into dangerous detail, I'll just say that I can personally think of six other ways from Sunday that our nation could be suddenly and very effectively attacked, with no warning and no simple way for our Homeland Security to prevent an EMP attack.

In short, it is our greatest vulnerability, not least because we are completely unprepared for it.
 
Next post:  What is EMP?  How to recognize it if it happens, what to do, and how to prepare for it.

Love,

-- Claudia





The hell of it, Claudia,  is that Uncle Sugar could be the one who pulls the trigger on this one. 

For those who have faith, no explanation is neccessary.
For those who have no faith, no explanation is possible.

St. Thomas Aquinas

If one turns his ear from hearing the Law, even his prayer is an abomination. Proverbs 28:9
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 8:50PM #4
mountain_man
Posts: 38,740

Aug 26, 2011 -- 7:09PM, Paravani wrote:

...The most frightening aspect of an EMP bomb is how cheap and easy it is to make one. ....


Sure, a few billion dollars to design one, a few billion for the delivery system, and only 50 or so billion dollars to make it. Damn cheap I'd say.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2011 - 9:20PM #5
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
Well, that certainly brightened my day and cheered me up.

Crikey indeed!
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2011 - 9:53AM #6
farragut
Posts: 3,937

EMP is a nice tactic, but I really prefer a neutron bomb.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2011 - 1:42PM #7
Paravani
Posts: 797

Aug 26, 2011 -- 8:50PM, mountain_man wrote:

Aug 26, 2011 -- 7:09PM, Paravani wrote:

...The most frightening aspect of an EMP bomb is how cheap and easy it is to make one. ....


Sure, a few billion dollars to design one, a few billion for the delivery system, and only 50 or so billion dollars to make it. Damn cheap I'd say.



So, what is an EMP, or electromagnetic pulse?


An EMP is a physical phenomenon that can fry electronic devices and electrical systems.  It burns out batteries and semi-conductors, it fries transformers and coils, it builds up so much charge along electrical lines that it can fry the insulation off of wires and destroy devices that are connected to the wires even if they're turned off.  


An EMP can be generated by many different sources, not just a nuclear bomb. There are natural sources of an EMP as well. 


For instance, the solar magnetic storm of 1859 generated large EMPs that knocked out most of the telegraphic system, zapped telegraph operators, ruined equipment, and set telegraph paper on fire.  Fortunately, the world in 1859 did not depend on electricity for much else besides the telegraph, so the EMPs then didn't create any life-threatening situations.


Although nuclear bombs are the most well-known devices that create EMPs, they are by no means the only devices that can do so.  There are many devices specifically designed to create an EMP that are much cheaper and easier to build than nuclear bombs.


An explosively pumped flux compression generator is fairly cheap and simple to build.  There are multiple examples online that show how to build one, at cost estimates ranging from $400 to $2000.  The materials necessary to build FCGs aren't, by and large, either terribly difficult to obtain or assemble -- any competent terrorist organization could probably manage to build several dozen without Homeland Security ever catching a whiff of anything rotten.


There are other designs that don't use any explosives at all, just large batteries and capacitors. 


Because there are so many different possible designs for EMP generators, it's impossible to regulate the sale of all the items that could be used to make one, especially because those items have many legitimate, innocuous uses.


Aug 26, 2011 -- 8:05PM, jane2 wrote:

Crikey, Claudia


Something will get me/us. I will NOT live in constant fear or weird preparedness.


J.



Hi, Jane!


Methinks this would be something to discuss with your brilliant grandson.


Aug 26, 2011 -- 8:19PM, Roodog wrote:

The hell of it, Claudia,  is that  Uncle Sugar could be the one who pulls the trigger on this one.



Hi, Roo!


Yeah, take THAT, North Korea, Pakistan, (fill-in-the-blank)!  Just TRY launching your nuclear missiles NOW, when you can't even send the order to launch.


Small countries are more vulnerable than large countries because just one device can acheive total coverage of a small country. 


I'm quite certain that we already have (certainly we SHOULD already have) satellites in orbit that are carrying nuclear devices.  Those devices don't need to give warning by being "launched" -- they simply need to receive the command to detonate, and large areas of the world will suddenly be without any electrical power or electronic devices.


Thanks, Roo!  Only a true cynic can bravely face reality, and your evil imagination is always welcome on my threads!


;-D


Aug 26, 2011 -- 9:20PM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Well, that certainly brightened my day and cheered me up.   Crikey indeed!



Hi, Dot!


Yeah, I'm not just a ball of sunshine, I'm an educational ball of sunshine!


;-D


Aug 27, 2011 -- 9:53AM, farragut wrote:

EMP is a nice tactic, but I really prefer a neutron bomb.



Hi, Farragut!


The problem with neutron bombs is that they're dirty, so they foul your own nest as well as destroying the target.


There are evil minds in government who will see an EMP as a "humane" solution to deal with countries whose possession of certain technologies worries us. 


The problem being, of course, that those countries may also see EMP as a humane solution to dealing with US.


The EMP threat is not a new one considered by U.S. defense planners. The    Soviet Union had experimented with the idea as a kind of super-weapon against    the U.S.

"What is different now is that some potential sources of EMP threats are    difficult to deter – they can be terrorist groups that have no state identity,    have only one or a few weapons and are motivated to attack the U.S. without    regard for their own safety," explains the commission report. "Rogue states,    such as North Korea and Iran, may also be developing the capability to pose an    EMP threat to the United States and may also be unpredictable and difficult to    deter."

Graham describes the potential "cascading effect" of an EMP attack. If    electrical power is knocked out and circuit boards fried, telecommunications    are disrupted, energy deliveries are impeded, the financial system breaks    down, food, water and gasoline become scarce.

As Kyl put it: "Few if any people would die right away. But the loss of power    would have a cascading effect on all aspects of U.S. society. Communication    would be largely impossible. Lack of refrigeration would leave food rotting in    warehouses, exacerbated by a lack of transportation as those vehicles still    working simply ran out of gas (which is pumped with electricity). The    inability to sanitize and distribute water would quickly threaten public    health, not to mention the safety of anyone in the path of the inevitable    fires, which would rage unchecked. And as we have seen in areas of natural and    other disasters, such circumstances often result in a fairly rapid breakdown    of social order."

"American society has grown so dependent on computer and other electrical    systems that we have created our own Achilles' heel of vulnerability,    ironically much greater than those of other, less developed nations," the    senator wrote. "When deprived of power, we are in many ways helpless, as the    New York City blackout made clear. In that case, power was restored quickly    because adjacent areas could provide help. But a large-scale burnout caused by    a broad EMP attack would create a much more difficult situation. Not only    would there be nobody nearby to help, it could take years to replace destroyed    equipment."

The commission said hardening key infrastructure systems and procuring vital    backup equipment such as transformers is both feasible and – compared with the    threat – relatively inexpensive.

"But it will take leadership by the Department of Homeland Security, the    Defense Department, and other federal agencies, along with support from    Congress, all of which have yet to materialize," wrote Kyl, so far the only    elected official blowing the whistle this alarming development.

Kyl concluded in his report: "The Sept. 11 commission report stated that our    biggest failure was one of 'imagination.' No one imagined that terrorists    would do what they did on Sept. 11. Today few Americans can conceive of the    possibility that terrorists could bring our society to its knees by destroying    everything we rely on that runs on electricity. But this time we've been    warned, and we'd better be prepared to respond."


One EMP burst and the world goes dark


The threat has even become political fodder, drawing warnings from former House speaker Newt Gingrich, a likely presidential contender.


"We are not today hardened against this," he told a Heritage Foundation audience last year. "It is an enormous catastrophic threat."


Love,


-- Claudia


 


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2011 - 2:53PM #8
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Claudia


This one just didn't fly.


The Heritage Foundation ??? Right-wing fear mongers.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2011 - 3:08PM #9
Paravani
Posts: 797

Aug 27, 2011 -- 2:53PM, jane2 wrote:


Claudia


This one just didn't fly.


The Heritage Foundation ??? Right-wing fear mongers.




Hi, Jane!


Sorry, which link?


Certainly, some links to EMP may be posted by "wingnuts", but even a stopped clock is right twice a day.


If you'll do an online search, you'll find many, many, MANY reputable sources of information and "fear-mongering".  EMP has also been the topic of the recent "GRID" act in Congress -- more on that later.


The bottom line here is that just because only physicists and electrical engineers understand our vulnerability doesn't mean it isn't real.  You may not understand how EMP works (I do, BTW, having a BS in electrical engineering), but please don't mistake your ignorance of a phenomenon as proof that it doesn't exist, or as evidence that only "wingnuts" are concerned.


Again, raise the topic with your genius grandson, and see what he says about it.  If he doesn't think Grandma needs to be coddled and sheltered from scary information, he'll probably tell you some really interesting stuff -- that is, if he's studied it at all.


Love,


-- Claudia


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2011 - 3:26PM #10
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
I have to wonder what benefit all this info is assumed to be for us. We can plead (about all any one of us can reasonably do) with our respective Congresspeople to do just what???

It's clear that anyone seeking to employ such devices would be exceedingly stealthy. Prevention is thus quite difficult. 

Frankly, I can't see how Jane's life will be improved much (what with her coping with a chronic illness) by asking her grandson to--presumably--confirm that the threat is as dire as you appear to think it is, Claudia. I'm not Jane so I can't presume what such a discussion might do, of course, to her state of mind and ability to retain her composure. Perhaps less than I fear it may.  

Honestly, I wonder if we really need this much knowledge about something likely to inspire paranoia primarily. I dunno, but I wonder.
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