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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 2:12AM #41
Stardove
Posts: 14,596

Aug 23, 2011 -- 2:28PM, JanaDale wrote:


The Beliefnet office is in Norfolk, Virginia. Everyone's alright here!




Good to hear Jana all is well at the office and all the staff are okay!

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Anger cannot occur unless you believe that you have been attacked, that your attack is justified in return, and that you are in no way responsible for it. ACIM

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 2:59AM #42
Wanderingal
Posts: 5,504

Paravani--I've got my drinking water but for a  different reason--the flash floods here often affect/damage the sewers and drains....


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 3:43AM #43
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,832

I agree that storing water just in case is wise, but as much trouble as I have keeping up with expiration dates on foods in the fridge and pantry, I'll take my chances. I'd never remember to haul out a jug of that stored water occasionally, use and refill it to keep the emergency supply fairly fresh!

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 7:08AM #44
Paravani
Posts: 797

Aug 25, 2011 -- 3:43AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

I agree that storing water just in case is wise, but as much trouble as I have keeping up with expiration dates on foods in the fridge and pantry, I'll take my chances. I'd never remember to haul out a jug of that stored water occasionally, use and refill it to keep the emergency supply fairly fresh!




Hi, All!


Just for general information -- 8 oz. of Potassium Bisulfite, enough to "sanitize" 200 gallons of wine (or water), costs $4.95 at Homebrew Heaven.  If you don't care about drinking a little extra sodium, the same amount of Sodium Bisulfite is only $3.95.


You may also see Sodium or Potassium metabisulfite.  Same purpose, same amounts -- use 1/8 teaspoon per gallon.


Sulfites work by adding free sulfur to the liquid.  The sulfur displaces free oxygen and kills off all bacteria, wild yeasts, mold, etc.  Then it outgasses -- goes into the air -- over the next 24-36 hours, so you need to keep your liquid open to the air.  For winemaking, we cover our "must" (fruit puree liquid) with a cloth to keep the flies out.  For sanitizing water, it's probably safe to just leave the cap off the bottle.


It's better to wait 24 hours before drinking the water -- otherwise the sulfite might give you really foul-smelling gas.  (Think rotten eggs.)


Or, you could add the sulfite just before you bottle your stored water, as winemakers do.  Then you would never need to worry about keeping the water "fresh" and safe to drink.


Love,


-- Claudia

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 7:42AM #45
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,832

Aug 25, 2011 -- 7:08AM, Paravani wrote:


Or, you could add the sulfite before you bottle your stored water, just as winemakers do.  Then you would never need to worry about keeping the water "fresh" and safe to drink.





Huh! Well, I certainly learned something. That would make storing water much simpler and easier for the disorganized such as myself.


Thanks much for the info!

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 8:04AM #46
Wanderingal
Posts: 5,504

Ha--I've got two gallons of water for emergencies caused by water outages.


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 9:10AM #47
TemplarS
Posts: 6,261

And now comes Irene.


Looks like it will spare Washington its full fury, but not so for cities farther up the coast (and me).


As the time draws closer, I'm sure this will be worthy of its own thread.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 10:16AM #48
Paravani
Posts: 797

Aug 25, 2011 -- 8:04AM, Wanderingal wrote:

Ha--I've got two gallons of water for emergencies caused by water outages.




Hi, All!


Well, if it's just for you, then that will last you for four days. 


If the emergency that happens isn't a flood or an earthquake, you also have clean water stored in your hot water heater.  (Bad earthquakes can knock down houses and water heaters; floods bad enough to knock out water/sewer service usually cover water heaters, at least their spigots, and also have the risk of sewage getting into the fresh water system.)


Bear in mind that 1/2 gallon per person per day is the bare minimum.  You will most likely find that when you are working hard with all your neighbors to help deal with the disaster, all of you will want to drink much more than that.


You may also find that your neighbors have neglected to store water, and if you like them you probably won't want to see them die of thirst, particularly if they have children.  It's always nice, if you can manage it, to have enough that you can choose to share.


Let me put it this way:  since water is absolutely necessary for life --  the primary necessity, more important than any other factor -- it's  never a bad idea to store more of it than you think you will need.


Love,


-- Claudia


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 11:04AM #49
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,832
Add tornadoes to that "if it isn't a ..." list.

If you have a basement, you'd probably be cowering near where your water supply was stored. Having it survive a very severe tornado if you've no basement would be much iffier.

Guess I'm so lackadaisical about storing water because we've no good shelter where we live. We generally go to bed hoping we wake as usual when there are tornado watches. So far, that's worked, although if the predicted "big one" akin to the New Madrid earthquake hits near us, we're pretty much screwed anyway. Virtually no structures in the STL metro are the least bit earthquake resistant.

Our plan in that event is to bend over and kiss significant anatomical features goodbye. ;-D
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 25, 2011 - 11:51AM #50
Paravani
Posts: 797

Aug 25, 2011 -- 11:04AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Add tornadoes to that "if it isn't a ..." list.   If you have a basement, you'd probably be cowering near where your water supply was stored. Having it survive a very severe tornado if you've no basement would be much iffier.   Guess I'm so lackadaisical about storing water because we've no good shelter where we live. We generally go to bed hoping we wake as usual when there are tornado watches. So far, that's worked, although if the predicted "big one" akin to the New Madrid earthquake hits near us, we're pretty much screwed anyway. Virtually no structures in the STL metro are the least bit earthquake resistant.   Our plan in that event is to bend over and kiss significant anatomical features goodbye. ;-D



Yeah, but gee...  wouldn't it just SUCK to survive the tornado and then die from thirst (or dysentery because you were so thirsty that you drank unsafe water)?


Love,


-- Claudia

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