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4 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2011 - 3:03PM #51
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,714

Mar 27, 2011 -- 10:42PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 26, 2011 -- 3:25PM, solfeggio wrote:


Canadians just hate to ever be confused with Americans.  So, when we hear the familiar North American accent in the shop where I work, and we happen to get into a conversation with him or her, we always first ask if the person is Canadian.  If the person is American, there's no problem.  But, if you ask a Canadian if s/he is American, you're in for trouble!


On the other hand, Brits, Irish, and Scots tend to be outgoing and gregarious.  They love to talk, and of course there is no danger of mistaking them for Americans.


I think it's all kind of silly.


 




Solf


I learned early in life that Canada is a sovereign country; I grew up about 200 miles from Montreal. In these times we Americans tend to be much kinder to Canadians than they often are to us. There is a resentment among certain Canadians I don't fathom, but my younger daughter runs into it in California.


C'est la vie.



 




 


Canada is two sovereign nations, Madame.  And, one of those pays has poutine and the legacy of Yvan Cournoyer; the other nation has "Tim Horton's", hence our name for an Anglophone as "un Tim" (pej.). 

*******

"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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4 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2011 - 3:24PM #52
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:03PM, mecdukebec wrote:


Mar 27, 2011 -- 10:42PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 26, 2011 -- 3:25PM, solfeggio wrote:


Canadians just hate to ever be confused with Americans.  So, when we hear the familiar North American accent in the shop where I work, and we happen to get into a conversation with him or her, we always first ask if the person is Canadian.  If the person is American, there's no problem.  But, if you ask a Canadian if s/he is American, you're in for trouble!


On the other hand, Brits, Irish, and Scots tend to be outgoing and gregarious.  They love to talk, and of course there is no danger of mistaking them for Americans.


I think it's all kind of silly.


 




Solf


I learned early in life that Canada is a sovereign country; I grew up about 200 miles from Montreal. In these times we Americans tend to be much kinder to Canadians than they often are to us. There is a resentment among certain Canadians I don't fathom, but my younger daughter runs into it in California.


C'est la vie.



 




 


Canada is two sovereign nations, Madame.  And, one of those pays has poutine and the legacy of Yvan Cournoyer; the other nation has "Tim Horton's", hence our name for an Anglophone as "un Tim" (pej.). 




A wee moment of truth--when I was a teen in the 50's, French Canadians were not all that welcome at resorts in the Adirondacks.


I've enjoyed my many visits to English and French-speaking Canada.

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2011 - 3:28PM #53
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,714

Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:24PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:03PM, mecdukebec wrote:


Mar 27, 2011 -- 10:42PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 26, 2011 -- 3:25PM, solfeggio wrote:


Canadians just hate to ever be confused with Americans.  So, when we hear the familiar North American accent in the shop where I work, and we happen to get into a conversation with him or her, we always first ask if the person is Canadian.  If the person is American, there's no problem.  But, if you ask a Canadian if s/he is American, you're in for trouble!


On the other hand, Brits, Irish, and Scots tend to be outgoing and gregarious.  They love to talk, and of course there is no danger of mistaking them for Americans.


I think it's all kind of silly.


 




Solf


I learned early in life that Canada is a sovereign country; I grew up about 200 miles from Montreal. In these times we Americans tend to be much kinder to Canadians than they often are to us. There is a resentment among certain Canadians I don't fathom, but my younger daughter runs into it in California.


C'est la vie.



 




 


Canada is two sovereign nations, Madame.  And, one of those pays has poutine and the legacy of Yvan Cournoyer; the other nation has "Tim Horton's", hence our name for an Anglophone as "un Tim" (pej.). 




A wee moment of truth--when I was a teen in the 50's, French Canadians were not all that welcome at resorts in the Adirondacks.


I've enjoyed my many visits to English and French-speaking Canada.





Nor were "they" all that welcome in Montréal, either.

*******

"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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4 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2011 - 3:44PM #54
Erey
Posts: 18,940

Mar 28, 2011 -- 9:25AM, Ironhold wrote:


If we want to be talking about negative experiences with foreigners, how about giving me room to knock the French?


The one Frenchman I ever had dealings with was a troll of a person who was pig ignorant about America but insisted upon making snide remarks anyway, and there's a certain French-Canadian I sometimes deal with who is similarly inclined to be a jerk (although in his case, he thinks it's funny whenever he disrupts conversations or makes homoerotic jokes at the expense of others).


Guess that means everyone who is French or considers themself French is a jerk, right?


After all, that's the standard that certain people here in this thread seem to be using against both Americans and Germans: judge the many by the antics of the few.


 


 


And for the record, I've got German on both sides of the family; my maternal grandmother was actually a war bride.




 


Haha - I don't have alot of experience with the French in France becaue I have not spent much time in France.  The French in the US are fine, and I have known several families.  My time in France i would define as weird.  I don't know what else to call it.  Just alot of weirdness. 


For one - I was flashed on 4 times within 3 days with full-frontal male nudity.  Something about me made the men want to just drop their pants in public places. 


Over 40+ years in the US I have been flashed similiarly about 4 times.  I don't know what was up with the french guys but no place else in Europe did the men flash me. 


Then we were staying in this hostel type thing run by this ancient old couple who could not speak english and I could not speak french but that was not the problem.  They really chewed me out one day because they thought I had guests in my room and did not pay them the extra amount.  Well it so happens that I was walking up to my room I was chatting with a couple of other guys around my age who were staying across the hallway.  "Hey where are you from, how are you" and we said goodnight. 


All I remember is all the old guy could say in English was "you had better not" which he kept repeating.  I am sure I looked like a deer in the headlights. 

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2011 - 4:43PM #55
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:28PM, mecdukebec wrote:


Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:24PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:03PM, mecdukebec wrote:


Mar 27, 2011 -- 10:42PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 26, 2011 -- 3:25PM, solfeggio wrote:


Canadians just hate to ever be confused with Americans.  So, when we hear the familiar North American accent in the shop where I work, and we happen to get into a conversation with him or her, we always first ask if the person is Canadian.  If the person is American, there's no problem.  But, if you ask a Canadian if s/he is American, you're in for trouble!


On the other hand, Brits, Irish, and Scots tend to be outgoing and gregarious.  They love to talk, and of course there is no danger of mistaking them for Americans.


I think it's all kind of silly.


 




Solf


I learned early in life that Canada is a sovereign country; I grew up about 200 miles from Montreal. In these times we Americans tend to be much kinder to Canadians than they often are to us. There is a resentment among certain Canadians I don't fathom, but my younger daughter runs into it in California.


C'est la vie.



 




 


Canada is two sovereign nations, Madame.  And, one of those pays has poutine and the legacy of Yvan Cournoyer; the other nation has "Tim Horton's", hence our name for an Anglophone as "un Tim" (pej.). 




A wee moment of truth--when I was a teen in the 50's, French Canadians were not all that welcome at resorts in the Adirondacks.


I've enjoyed my many visits to English and French-speaking Canada.





Nor were "they" all that welcome in Montréal, either.




Too funny.......................




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4 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2011 - 4:49PM #56
mecdukebec
Posts: 14,714

Mar 28, 2011 -- 4:43PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:28PM, mecdukebec wrote:


Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:24PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 28, 2011 -- 3:03PM, mecdukebec wrote:


Mar 27, 2011 -- 10:42PM, jane2 wrote:


Mar 26, 2011 -- 3:25PM, solfeggio wrote:


Canadians just hate to ever be confused with Americans.  So, when we hear the familiar North American accent in the shop where I work, and we happen to get into a conversation with him or her, we always first ask if the person is Canadian.  If the person is American, there's no problem.  But, if you ask a Canadian if s/he is American, you're in for trouble!


On the other hand, Brits, Irish, and Scots tend to be outgoing and gregarious.  They love to talk, and of course there is no danger of mistaking them for Americans.


I think it's all kind of silly.


 




Solf


I learned early in life that Canada is a sovereign country; I grew up about 200 miles from Montreal. In these times we Americans tend to be much kinder to Canadians than they often are to us. There is a resentment among certain Canadians I don't fathom, but my younger daughter runs into it in California.


C'est la vie.



 




 


Canada is two sovereign nations, Madame.  And, one of those pays has poutine and the legacy of Yvan Cournoyer; the other nation has "Tim Horton's", hence our name for an Anglophone as "un Tim" (pej.). 




A wee moment of truth--when I was a teen in the 50's, French Canadians were not all that welcome at resorts in the Adirondacks.


I've enjoyed my many visits to English and French-speaking Canada.





Nor were "they" all that welcome in Montréal, either.




Too funny.......................








Ah, but up through the 1960s, there was the Kebecois "la vengeance du berceau."  -- That was sort of why "they" kept replacements in abundant numbers, until Jean Drapeau showed up. 

*******

"Wesley told the early Methodists to gain all they could and save all they could so that they could give all they could. It means that I consider my money to belong to God and I see myself as one of the hungry people who needs to get fed with God’s money. If I really have put all my trust in Jesus Christ as savior and Lord, then nothing I have is really my own anymore."
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4 years ago  ::  Apr 04, 2011 - 5:04PM #57
rangerken
Posts: 16,408

This thread was moved from the Hot topics Zone

Libertarian, Conservative, Life member of the NRA and VFW
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