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4 years ago  ::  Sep 26, 2010 - 1:19PM #21
teilhard
Posts: 50,157

Most likely, The SCOTUS would not agree -- on Basis of The First Amendment ...


Sep 26, 2010 -- 12:18PM, Weepingangelofthetrees wrote:


Sep 26, 2010 -- 10:08AM, Ebon wrote:


The IRS should be ready to start taxing some churches then. It's pay to play, kids. If you want to talk politics, hand over the cash, no representation without taxation.




I completely agree. I have a sticker on my car that says "Churches should stay out of Politics, or be Taxed!"


However, I think if the IRS were ever going to follow up on putting some teeth in enforcement of the regulations governing religious 501c3, they'd have acted when myriads of people petitioned them to revoke the Church of Mormon in California, after it spent millions in order to get Prop 8 passed.


Bigotry backed by big bucks!That's some ministering. That goes a long way to prove they can't possibly believe Jesus would approve.





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4 years ago  ::  Sep 26, 2010 - 1:26PM #22
Weepingangelofthetrees
Posts: 2,053

Sep 26, 2010 -- 1:19PM, teilhard wrote:


Most likely, The SCOTUS would not agree -- on Basis of The First Amendment ...


Sep 26, 2010 -- 12:18PM, Weepingangelofthetrees wrote:


Sep 26, 2010 -- 10:08AM, Ebon wrote:


The IRS should be ready to start taxing some churches then. It's pay to play, kids. If you want to talk politics, hand over the cash, no representation without taxation.




I completely agree. I have a sticker on my car that says "Churches should stay out of Politics, or be Taxed!"


However, I think if the IRS were ever going to follow up on putting some teeth in enforcement of the regulations governing religious 501c3, they'd have acted when myriads of people petitioned them to revoke the Church of Mormon in California, after it spent millions in order to get Prop 8 passed.


Bigotry backed by big bucks!That's some ministering. That goes a long way to prove they can't possibly believe Jesus would approve.







I don't think the U.S. Supreme Court has any say in this part of it. The 501c3 allocation for churches is a contract. In order to acquire the tax exemption, the church has to apply to the IRS and agree to the terms and conditions therein.


IRS 501c3  Political and Lobbying Activities


"Remember, Jesus would rather constantly shame gays than let orphans have a family."
Stephen Colbert
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4 years ago  ::  Sep 27, 2010 - 11:50AM #23
teilhard
Posts: 50,157

Even The IRS Tax Codes are under the Supervision of Congress and Courts ...


Sep 26, 2010 -- 1:26PM, Weepingangelofthetrees wrote:


Sep 26, 2010 -- 1:19PM, teilhard wrote:


Most likely, The SCOTUS would not agree -- on Basis of The First Amendment ...


Sep 26, 2010 -- 12:18PM, Weepingangelofthetrees wrote:


Sep 26, 2010 -- 10:08AM, Ebon wrote:


The IRS should be ready to start taxing some churches then. It's pay to play, kids. If you want to talk politics, hand over the cash, no representation without taxation.




I completely agree. I have a sticker on my car that says "Churches should stay out of Politics, or be Taxed!"


However, I think if the IRS were ever going to follow up on putting some teeth in enforcement of the regulations governing religious 501c3, they'd have acted when myriads of people petitioned them to revoke the Church of Mormon in California, after it spent millions in order to get Prop 8 passed.


Bigotry backed by big bucks!That's some ministering. That goes a long way to prove they can't possibly believe Jesus would approve.







I don't think the U.S. Supreme Court has any say in this part of it. The 501c3 allocation for churches is a contract. In order to acquire the tax exemption, the church has to apply to the IRS and agree to the terms and conditions therein.


IRS 501c3  Political and Lobbying Activities





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4 years ago  ::  Sep 27, 2010 - 11:56AM #24
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,051

Sep 26, 2010 -- 10:08AM, Ebon wrote:


The IRS should be ready to start taxing some churches then. It's pay to play, kids. If you want to talk politics, hand over the cash, no representation without taxation.




Not fully true for a 501c3. I work for one and we are allowed to talk politics and issues. What we're not allowed to do is tell our members who to vote for, but we can encourage them to vote on certain issues (for us, anything that affects Community Health Centers).

"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't believe, no proof is possible.” Stuart Chase
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4 years ago  ::  Sep 27, 2010 - 2:25PM #25
Do_unto_others
Posts: 8,399

This IS the Alliance 'Defense' (ahem) Fund we're talking about. At least they're discussing political candidates instead of God's gay and lesbian children (for a change).

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 27, 2010 - 7:04PM #26
Weepingangelofthetrees
Posts: 2,053

Sep 27, 2010 -- 11:50AM, teilhard wrote:


Even The IRS Tax Codes are under the Supervision of Congress and Courts ...








I am well aware of that. However, that wasn't the topic of my reply, to someone who invoked the 1st amendment and the USSC.


"Remember, Jesus would rather constantly shame gays than let orphans have a family."
Stephen Colbert
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4 years ago  ::  Oct 04, 2010 - 2:25AM #27
rangerken
Posts: 16,407

This thread was moved from the Hot Topics Zone

Libertarian, Conservative, Life member of the NRA and VFW
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4 years ago  ::  Oct 04, 2010 - 12:45PM #28
TPaine
Posts: 9,235

Perhaps a look at what the IRS Code says on the matter may help the discussion.


The Restriction of Political Campaign Intervention by Section 501(c)(3) Tax-Exempt Organizations
 
Under the Internal Revenue Code, all section 501(c)(3) organizations are absolutely prohibited from directly or indirectly participating in, or intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for elective public office. Contributions to political campaign funds or public statements of position (verbal or written) made on behalf of the organization in favor of or in opposition to any candidate for public office clearly violate the prohibition against political campaign activity.  Violating this prohibition may result in denial or revocation of tax-exempt status and the imposition of certain excise taxes.

Certain activities or expenditures may not be prohibited depending on the facts and circumstances.  For example, certain voter education activities (including presenting public forums and publishing voter education guides) conducted in a non-partisan manner do not constitute prohibited political campaign activity. In addition, other activities intended to encourage people to participate in the electoral process, such as voter registration and get-out-the-vote drives, would not be prohibited political campaign activity if conducted in a non-partisan manner.

On the other hand, voter education or registration activities with evidence of bias that (a) would favor one candidate over another; (b) oppose a candidate in some manner; or (c) have the effect of favoring a candidate or group of candidates, will constitute prohibited participation or intervention.

The Internal Revenue Service provides resources  to exempt organizations and the public to help them understand the prohibition.  As part of its examination program, the IRS also monitors whether organizations are complying with the prohibition.



    
www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article...

"It is always to be taken for granted, that those who oppose an equality of rights never mean the exclusion should take place on themselves." -- Thomas Paine: Dissertations on First Principles of Government (July 7, 1795)
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