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6 years ago  ::  Jun 04, 2008 - 4:50PM #1
Erey
Posts: 19,149
Here is an interesting article:
http://www.metimes.com/International/20 … aida/7536/

Basically back in April 12 a Shite Mosque was bombed, this particular mosque has a cleric who is vocal in his criticisms of Sunni extremism. 
Several sources including the Shite cleric declared that the bombing was perpetrated by a sunni group that aligns itself with Al Qaida.

However the Iranian govt denies this claiming that the bombing was instead monarchists under the direction of US, Britian and Israel.  Why would either of these countries want to bomb an anti- Al Queda mosque? 


Basically this puts Iran in a difficult and painful situation having to admit they were bombed by AlQueda (esque) forces instead of "the west". This is a problem because despite all of Iran's anti-west, anti-US and anti-israel rhetoric Al Queda is still willing to bomb THEM because they are Shite.   And despite all their work against the west the enemy of my enemy is not my friend.  That Al Queda cannot consider themselves allied with Iran because and only because they are Shite. 

For Iran to question it's anti-Israel, Anti-American policy would be very painful because they have long used this as a pretext to controlling liberties and resisting any true democracy.  Iran can claim that America or Israel or Al Queda is more of a threat because there have been several Al Queda related bombings within Iran.
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2008 - 1:28PM #2
SherriMunnerlyn
Posts: 7,519
Erey,

Your comments show your obvious lack of knowlege about the historical relationship between Iran, which has a Muslim Shiite fundamentalist government and Al Qaeda, a radical Sunni Muslim group. They hate each other, and they always have. The Taliban, remember them, Al Qaeda's best friends in Afghanistan, killed 10 Iranian diplomats and an Iranian journalist in Afghanistan, when the two countries were trying to establish a diplomatic relationship with each other. Their bodies were left lying in the building for two days until they were buried in a mass grave in the compound of the Sultan Razia Girls' High School. This almost led to a war in September 1998.

In addition, Taliban members went through a town in Afghanistan, Mazar-e Sharif, and committed a ferocious massacre in August 1998,  seizing and slaughtering every Shiite there, man, woman, and child. They went door to door on their killing spree, saying  they could recognize Shiites by their facial features.

Robert Fisk describes this Sunni Taliban massacre of Shiites, from statements of a witness retrieved by the UN.  "They were shooting without warning at everybody who happened to be on the street, without discriminating between men, women and children. Soon the streets were covered with dead bodies and with blood. No one was allowed to bury the corpses for ... six days. Dogs were eating human flesh and going mad and soon the smell became intolerable." The same witness describes day 2 of the Taliban conquest of this village, the house to house searches for Shiite Muslim families identified by their facial features. "Almost all who were found were either shot three times on the spot (one bullet in the head, one in the chest and one in the testicles), slaughtered in the Halal way (with a knife to the throat) or stuffed into containers after being badly beaten." Up to twelve of these containers were parked all day long in the sun with sealed doors. The witness saw one conrtainer opened after all males had suffocated.  "Some of the containers were filled with children (boys and girls) who were taken to an unknown destination after their parents were killed." The UN report said women were usually abused and there were many rapes reported. A witness fleeing heard the calls of the muezzins in the mosques "asking all Shias to convert to Sunni [Islam] and attend the daily prayers for their own sake." (pgs 849-850 Robert Fisk The Great War For Civilisation).   It was reported that not one person taken by the Taliban, including the children,  returned.

There is hate between Iran and Al Qaeda. Iran has not tried to hide or conceal these events. They have not tried to hide or conceal their hate for each other. Hezbullah recently, during their conflict with the Lebanese government,  reported on their website that Al Qaeda had publicly called their members to Lebanon to fight Hezbullah.  The only reason I can think of that you do not know about the hate between the Iranian government and Al Qaeda is because our biased mainstream media does not talk about it and you obviously have not read the many comments about the animosity between these two groups that has been addressed many times in these discussion boards.

Sherri
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2008 - 1:42PM #3
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,572
I find myself in agreement with sherri here.  Rare I know, but anytrhing is possible...

The likelyhood that the Iranian Council of Clerics would ever cooperate wih al-Qaida is almost as likely as an alliance between the Protestant Brotherhood of Ulster and the Catholic IRA Provos. 

There's only a few hundred years of nassacres and bad blood bewteen the Sunnis and Shiites for such an alliance to be possible.
"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2008 - 1:55PM #4
Armwar
Posts: 12,019
I believe Iran is trying to use Al-queda, and that it supplies them with weapons.  This shows that its efforts may be misguided.  Very complicated maneuverings here.

Maybe this was a rogue al-queda group.

Gail
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2008 - 2:26PM #5
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,572
Possible, yes.

Probable, no.
"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2008 - 3:10PM #6
SherriMunnerlyn
Posts: 7,519
Erey,

Part of what I think we are seeing is a mischaracterization of groups as Al-Qaeda, who are not really Al-Qaeda. That could easily explain seemingly simiar Shiite groups identifying perpetrators of attacks differently. Another problem is it may not be clear who is behind specific attacks.

This whole issue is further complicated by the fact that the US government has armed the Shiite government and  Sunnis, too. Do you have any evidence that the US or their allies (which we can even debate who that might be and itself changes over time) was not behind that attack? You do not know that they were'nt. We really know very little about what is actually happening in Iraq today. There is little news coverage, and it is increasingly by the military. There are fewer and fewer reporters there, because of the security situation and what appers to be intentional attacks on journalists, that the US may even be involved in.

Sherri
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6 years ago  ::  Jun 07, 2008 - 1:09AM #7
habesor
Posts: 5,765
Folks,

I would just like to remind you that in the Middle East, perhaps more so than elsewhere, politics makes for strange bedfellows. Groups that should be allies become terrible antagonists (e.g. Syria and Iraq; both Baathist governments) while others that should be antagonistic are firm allies (e.g. Syria and Iran). In my neighborhood we have the Gaza district where Fatah and Hamas fought a short bloody civil war and since then Fatah armed formations in Gaza have fought alongside Hamas while at the same time similar formations are violently supressing the Hamas party in the West Bank. Also operating at a certain level of cooperation in Gaza are Hizbollah agents, Al Qaida and apparantly some Iranian Revolutionary Guards. There is no guarantee that fighting won't break out between them at some point in the future.

It isn't the case where religious, ethnic, ideological and national differences AND SIMILARITIES are not important. It is simply the fact that political interests can over ride all of them.

Habesor
Habesor
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