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Switch to Forum Live View SCIENCE AND THE ENDTIMES
2 years ago  ::  Jul 21, 2012 - 5:32PM #121
Ken
Posts: 33,860

Jul 21, 2012 -- 3:25PM, theinterpreter wrote:

The first horseman is the first Christian conqueror. And yes it has nothing to do with the endtimes if you mean today's events because the Revelation has been unfolding for many centuries.



I'm still waiting for your source. How do you know that Constantine rode a white horse and conquered with a bow? Please cite primary historical documents.

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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 1:05PM #122
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Jul 21, 2012 -- 5:32PM, Ken wrote:


Jul 21, 2012 -- 3:25PM, theinterpreter wrote:

The first horseman is the first Christian conqueror. And yes it has nothing to do with the endtimes if you mean today's events because the Revelation has been unfolding for many centuries.



I'm still waiting for your source. How do you know that Constantine rode a white horse and conquered with a bow? Please cite primary historical documents.



I remember reading somehere that after the battle of Milvan Bridge, Constantine made his triumphant entry in a chariot pulled by seven white horses. I think it is depicted on the Arch of Constantine.


As for the bow, it was still used in the 4th century, but not much after that, indicating the timeframe of the 1st horseman.

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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 1:44PM #123
MysticWanderer
Posts: 1,322

Jul 22, 2012 -- 1:05PM, theinterpreter wrote:


Jul 21, 2012 -- 5:32PM, Ken wrote:


I'm still waiting for your source. How do you know that Constantine rode a white horse and conquered with a bow? Please cite primary historical documents.



I remember reading somehere that after the battle of Milvan Bridge, Constantine made his triumphant entry in a chariot pulled by seven white horses. I think it is depicted on the Arch of Constantine.


As for the bow, it was still used in the 4th century, but not much after that, indicating the timeframe of the 1st horseman.




" I remember reading somewhere " Is NOT a source as you seem to think.  A source is a specific book or article that others can look up and read. 


The Arch of Constantine as it exists today cannot corroborate any color as it is not painted but a bas relief sculpture. 


As far as the use of the bow after the 4th century try Crecy, Agincourt during the Hundred Years War or the entire conquest of the Mongols.

"Not all who wander are lost" J.R.R.Tolkein
You can safely assume that you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do. ~Anne Lamott
"Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain."
Friedrich von Schiller
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 4:16PM #124
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Theinterpreter:


"As for the bow, it was still used in the 4th century, but not much after that, indicating the timeframe of the 1st horseman."


You just can't help yourself, can you?


If there is a fact somewhere, you are gonna get it wrong.


The Mongol army used mounted archers to creat the largest contigous empire the world has seen.

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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 4:37PM #125
Ken
Posts: 33,860

Jul 22, 2012 -- 1:44PM, MysticWanderer wrote:


Jul 22, 2012 -- 1:05PM, theinterpreter wrote:


Jul 21, 2012 -- 5:32PM, Ken wrote:


I'm still waiting for your source. How do you know that Constantine rode a white horse and conquered with a bow? Please cite primary historical documents.



I remember reading somehere that after the battle of Milvan Bridge, Constantine made his triumphant entry in a chariot pulled by seven white horses. I think it is depicted on the Arch of Constantine.


As for the bow, it was still used in the 4th century, but not much after that, indicating the timeframe of the 1st horseman.




" I remember reading somewhere " Is NOT a source as you seem to think.  A source is a specific book or article that others can look up and read.



Didn't I ask for primary historical documentation? I'm not going to accept anything else.


Roman triumphal chariots never had more than four horses.


To ride in a chariot is not to ride on a horse.


By the way, I'm still waiting for that citation from Mein Kampf. I'll give you one more week.

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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 6:26PM #126
TPaine
Posts: 9,035

Jul 22, 2012 -- 1:05PM, theinterpreter wrote:


I remember reading somehere that after the battle of Milvan Bridge, Constantine made his triumphant entry in a chariot pulled by seven white horses. I think it is depicted on the Arch of Constantine.


As for the bow, it was still used in the 4th century, but not much after that, indicating the timeframe of the 1st horseman.



Riding in a chariot is not the same as riding a horse anymore than riding in a nineteenth century stage coast is not the same as riding a horse. To ride a horse one has to sit on the horse's back, not be pulled in a wheeled vehicle.


It has been pointed out to you that the use and effectiveness of the bow lasted long past the 4th century CE. The Mongols created an empire that reached from the Pacific Ocean to Europe during the 13th century CE led by their mounted archers. During the Hundred Years War English longbowmen were mainly responsible for their victories at the battles of Crecy (1346), Poitiers (1356), and Agincourt (1415) over a thousand years after the death of Constantine in 337. They finally became obsolete near the beginning of the 16th century when the matchlock musket became universally used.

"When it shall be said in any country in the world, my poor are happy; neither ignorance nor distress is to be found among them; my jails are empty of prisoners, my streets of beggars; the aged are not in want, the taxes are not oppressive; the rational world is my friend, because I am a friend of its happiness: When these things can be said, then may the country boast its constitution and its government." -- Thomas Paine: The Rights Of Man (1791)
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 8:48PM #127
IDBC
Posts: 4,361

Does anyone know when was the last time the bow and arrow was used by the cavlary in a war?    


 

HAVE A THINKING DAY MAY REASON GUIDE YOU
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 22, 2012 - 10:00PM #128
TPaine
Posts: 9,035

Jul 22, 2012 -- 8:48PM, IDBC wrote:


Does anyone know when was the last time the bow and arrow was used by the cavlary in a war?



I know they were used by Eastern European armies such as Muscovites, Kalmycks, Turks, and Cossacks well into the 17th century. American Plains Indians used them into the 19th century until they found sources for rifles and carbines.

"When it shall be said in any country in the world, my poor are happy; neither ignorance nor distress is to be found among them; my jails are empty of prisoners, my streets of beggars; the aged are not in want, the taxes are not oppressive; the rational world is my friend, because I am a friend of its happiness: When these things can be said, then may the country boast its constitution and its government." -- Thomas Paine: The Rights Of Man (1791)
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 23, 2012 - 1:00PM #129
IDBC
Posts: 4,361

Howdy TPaine


Jul 22, 2012 -- 8:48PM, IDBC wrote:


Does anyone know when was the last time the bow and arrow was used by the cavlary in a war?



Jul 22, 2012 -- 10:00PM, TPaine wrote:


I know they were used by Eastern European armies such as Muscovites, Kalmycks, Turks, and Cossacks well into the 17th century. American Plains Indians used them into the 19th century until they found sources for rifles and carbines.




Thank for your answering my question.  


I think that the last time that the cavlary, using rifles was used was in WWII.   I recall seeing films on the Military Channel showing brave(or foolish)Polish cavalry charging German tanks.  

HAVE A THINKING DAY MAY REASON GUIDE YOU
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 23, 2012 - 5:17PM #130
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Jul 22, 2012 -- 6:26PM, TPaine wrote:


Jul 22, 2012 -- 1:05PM, theinterpreter wrote:


I remember reading somehere that after the battle of Milvan Bridge, Constantine made his triumphant entry in a chariot pulled by seven white horses. I think it is depicted on the Arch of Constantine.


As for the bow, it was still used in the 4th century, but not much after that, indicating the timeframe of the 1st horseman.



Riding in a chariot is not the same as riding a horse anymore than riding in a nineteenth century stage coast is not the same as riding a horse. To ride a horse one has to sit on the horse's back, not be pulled in a wheeled vehicle.


It has been pointed out to you that the use and effectiveness of the bow lasted long past the 4th century CE. The Mongols created an empire that reached from the Pacific Ocean to Europe during the 13th century CE led by their mounted archers. During the Hundred Years War English longbowmen were mainly responsible for their victories at the battles of Crecy (1346), Poitiers (1356), and Agincourt (1415) over a thousand years after the death of Constantine in 337. They finally became obsolete near the beginning of the 16th century when the matchlock musket became universally used.



Constantine clearly favored white horses.


 I was talking about the use of bows by Roman armies.

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