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Switch to Forum Live View 2011 in Bible Prophecy
7 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2011 - 9:50PM #81
SecondSonOfDavid
Posts: 3,346

A thought about the Arch-Bad-Man, if I may.


Assuming Scripture is true, it's written that 'no man knows the day or the hour', which of course would mean Satan does not know either.  Now, for us humans not knowing the end of the world would be disappointing perhaps, we might guess wrong and be embarrassed, but Satan's in a real fix.  He's been trying to end the world all along, and how the deuce is he supposed to get his AntiChrist in place if he puts him in the wrong place and time?


Well, what he does is keep putting out AntiChrists until, hmmm, until one hits the right spot in the way of things.


So, not only were Nero, Napoleon, Hitler, and so on Anti-Christs, they were failed Anti-Christs.


Just a thought to chew on ...


 


Doch thiel vienve


 


 

That which does not kill me, will try again and get nastier.
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 11:26AM #82
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Daniel, it was our friend Theinterpreter posting that Hitler was 'the Antichrist' that elicited my thoughts.

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 5:16PM #83
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Apr 5, 2011 -- 12:02PM, wohali wrote:


The Mayo Clinic disagrees with you about skin cancer:


www.bing.com/health/article/mayo-125510/...


 


I think that Yonkers is the new "Rome"


 


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_cla...



OK. I'll bite. How, pray tell, does mayo clinic disagree with me?

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 5:22PM #84
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Apr 5, 2011 -- 2:34PM, peterthesplitfish wrote:


Interpreter,


I guess you never heard about the Little Ice Age?


www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/lia/little_...


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age


www.eh-resources.org/timeline/timeline_l...


So if you're going to writing something...make sure you remove your foot before opening the mouth or be sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth...or in this case...keyboard.


Peter



What does a little ice age have to do with global warming?

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 5:53PM #85
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Apr 5, 2011 -- 4:34PM, TPaine wrote:


Apr 5, 2011 -- 9:40AM, theinterpreter wrote:


Moscow, by way of canals, sits on five seas. And Moscow, because of the fact that it sits on 7 hills, is known as the "Third Rome" (After the fall of Rome, Constantinople was called the Second Rome because it too sat on 7 hills. And after the fall of Constantinople, Moscow began to be called the Third Rome). Soviet era Moscow is the great city that ruled over many "peoples, multitueds, nations and tongues" and was briefly alligned with Hitler the antichrist.



Actually, the Jews called Rome Babylon following the destruction of the second temple in 70 CE. That is the symbolism of  Revelation 17:5. If a city can be considered sitting on the sea because it is connected by canals and rivers, the following cities would be "on a sea:" Minneapolis, Chicago, St. Louis, Paris, Berlin, Beijing, and Santa Cruz among others. Hitler, a Christian, would be far less likely to be the Antichrist than Stalin or Mao. History is full of evil despots.


Yes Babylon has many heads. Mosow is another because she receives ships from 5 seas. Moscow is the great whore and mother of whores (atheist nations).


Apr 5, 2011 -- 9:40AM, theinterpreter wrote:

Muslims conquered Jerusalem in 636 AD. But it can also be argued that the trampling did not start until the abomination of desolation appeared in the Holy Spot (also known as the Dome on the Rock).



The Dome of the Rock was completed 55 years later in 691 CE. The math still doesn't work.


Apr 5, 2011 -- 9:40AM, theinterpreter wrote:

I just questioned you assertion.


Construction on the Dome on the Rock began in 685AD. The trampling ended with the end of WW II and the creation of Israel 3 1/2 years later as prophesied. 


Skin cancer is not a plague. I never said it was.


Skin cancer is one of the plagues.


Apr 5, 2011 -- 9:40AM, theinterpreter wrote:

Skin cancer is one of the last plagues, but no deaths are attributed to it. New cases of skin cancer each year outnumbers all other cancers combined. And it only affects those who worship the suntanned Aryan look, as first promoted by Hitler the antichrist.



Actually, sun tanning became popular in the 1920's because people liked the tanned look of Coco Chanel, and the dark-skinned African-American Josephine Baker. It had nothing to do with Hitler.



Skin cancer affects Aryans, the image of the beast promoted by Hitler.

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 5:56PM #86
peterthesplitfish
Posts: 1,609

Apr 6, 2011 -- 5:22PM, theinterpreter wrote:


Apr 5, 2011 -- 2:34PM, peterthesplitfish wrote:


Interpreter,


I guess you never heard about the Little Ice Age?


www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/lia/little_...


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age


www.eh-resources.org/timeline/timeline_l...


So if you're going to writing something...make sure you remove your foot before opening the mouth or be sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth...or in this case...keyboard.


Peter



What does a little ice age have to do with global warming?





It is quite obvious you did not read anything here. We are on the back side of that, which means we are naturally warming up to a period similar what occured during the Middle Ages. The problem is that man is speeding up this process and taking away Earth's natural filters of 'greenhouse' gasses. The earth goes through these fazes over periods beyond human history are based upon patterns from the Sun, but wait...you'd know that if you'd read anything I put a link to.


Peter

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 6:08PM #87
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Apr 6, 2011 -- 5:56PM, peterthesplitfish wrote:


Apr 6, 2011 -- 5:22PM, theinterpreter wrote:


Apr 5, 2011 -- 2:34PM, peterthesplitfish wrote:


Interpreter,


I guess you never heard about the Little Ice Age?


www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/lia/little_...


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age


www.eh-resources.org/timeline/timeline_l...


So if you're going to writing something...make sure you remove your foot before opening the mouth or be sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth...or in this case...keyboard.


Peter



What does a little ice age have to do with global warming?





It is quite obvious you did not read anything here. We are on the back side of that, which means we are naturally warming up to a period similar what occured during the Middle Ages. The problem is that man is speeding up this process and taking away Earth's natural filters of 'greenhouse' gasses. The earth goes through these fazes over periods beyond human history are based upon patterns from the Sun, but wait...you'd know that if you'd read anything I put a link to.


Peter



What are we arguing about? The Bible does not say the plague of a scorching sun is man-made, though I agree with you that man contributes to it.

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 6:38PM #88
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Theinterpreter:


"OK. I'll bite. How, pray tell, does mayo clinic disagree with me?"


From the website that I linked:


Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.


Ultraviolet light and other potential causes
Much of the damage to DNA in skin cells results from ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight and in commercial tanning lamps and tanning beds. But sun exposure doesn't explain skin cancers that develop on skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. This indicates that other factors may contribute to your risk of skin cancer, such as being exposed to toxic substances or having a condition that weakens your immune system.


risk-factors
Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of skin cancer include:


  • Fair skin. Anyone of any skin color can get skin cancer. However, having less pigment (melanin) in your skin provides less protection from damaging UV radiation. If you have blond or red hair and light-colored eyes, and you freckle or sunburn easily, you're much more likely to develop skin cancer than is a person with darker skin.
  • A history of sunburns. Every time you get sunburned, you damage your skin cells and increase your risk of developing skin cancer. After a sunburn, your body works to repair the damage. Having multiple blistering sunburns as a child or teenager increases your risk of developing skin cancer as an adult. Sunburns in adulthood also are a risk factor.
  • Excessive sun exposure. Anyone who spends considerable time in the sun may develop skin cancer, especially if the skin isn't protected by sunscreen or clothing. Tanning, including exposure to tanning lamps and beds, also puts you at risk. A tan is your skin's injury response to excessive UV radiation.
  • Sunny or high-altitude climates. People who live in sunny, warm climates are exposed to more sunlight than are people who live in colder climates. Living at higher elevations, where the sunlight is strongest, also exposes you to more radiation.
  • Moles. People who have many moles or abnormal moles called dysplastic nevi are at increased risk of skin cancer. These abnormal moles — which look irregular and are generally larger than normal moles — are more likely than others to become cancerous. If you have a history of abnormal moles, watch them regularly for changes.
  • Precancerous skin lesions. Having skin lesions known as actinic keratoses can increase your risk of developing skin cancer. These precancerous skin growths typically appear as rough, scaly patches that range in color from brown to dark pink. They're most common on the face, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been sun damaged.
  • A family history of skin cancer. If one of your parents or a sibling has had skin cancer, you may have an increased risk of the disease.
  • A personal history of skin cancer. If you developed skin cancer once, you're at risk of developing it again. Even basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas that have been successfully removed can recur.
  • A weakened immune system. People with weakened immune systems have a greater risk of developing skin cancer. This includes people living with HIV/AIDS or leukemia and those taking immunosuppressant drugs after an organ transplant.
  • Exposure to certain substances. Exposure to certain substances, such as arsenic, may increase your risk of skin cancer.
  • Increasing age. The risk of developing skin cancer increases with age, primarily because many skin cancers develop slowly. The damage that occurs during childhood or adolescence may not become apparent until middle age. Still, skin cancer isn't limited to older people and can occur at any age.


 


Some statistics:


www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/race....


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7 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2011 - 8:10PM #89
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Theinterpreter:


'Aids is one of them, and it can be argued that it mainly affects atheists. There are other drug-resistant diseases like MRSA. MRSA killed my ex-wife who was an atheist.."


I missed this before. AIDS affects mainly atheists?


You think that your ex-wife death due to MRSA was somehow attributible to her being an atheist?


Who do you consider an atheist?


This should be good...........

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2011 - 5:15PM #90
theinterpreter
Posts: 1,699

Apr 6, 2011 -- 6:38PM, wohali wrote:


Theinterpreter:


"OK. I'll bite. How, pray tell, does mayo clinic disagree with me?"


From the website that I linked:


Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.


Ultraviolet light and other potential causes
Much of the damage to DNA in skin cells results from ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight and in commercial tanning lamps and tanning beds. But sun exposure doesn't explain skin cancers that develop on skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. This indicates that other factors may contribute to your risk of skin cancer, such as being exposed to toxic substances or having a condition that weakens your immune system.


risk-factors
Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of skin cancer include:


  • Fair skin. Anyone of any skin color can get skin cancer. However, having less pigment (melanin) in your skin provides less protection from damaging UV radiation. If you have blond or red hair and light-colored eyes, and you freckle or sunburn easily, you're much more likely to develop skin cancer than is a person with darker skin.
  • A history of sunburns. Every time you get sunburned, you damage your skin cells and increase your risk of developing skin cancer. After a sunburn, your body works to repair the damage. Having multiple blistering sunburns as a child or teenager increases your risk of developing skin cancer as an adult. Sunburns in adulthood also are a risk factor.
  • Excessive sun exposure. Anyone who spends considerable time in the sun may develop skin cancer, especially if the skin isn't protected by sunscreen or clothing. Tanning, including exposure to tanning lamps and beds, also puts you at risk. A tan is your skin's injury response to excessive UV radiation.
  • Sunny or high-altitude climates. People who live in sunny, warm climates are exposed to more sunlight than are people who live in colder climates. Living at higher elevations, where the sunlight is strongest, also exposes you to more radiation.
  • Moles. People who have many moles or abnormal moles called dysplastic nevi are at increased risk of skin cancer. These abnormal moles — which look irregular and are generally larger than normal moles — are more likely than others to become cancerous. If you have a history of abnormal moles, watch them regularly for changes.
  • Precancerous skin lesions. Having skin lesions known as actinic keratoses can increase your risk of developing skin cancer. These precancerous skin growths typically appear as rough, scaly patches that range in color from brown to dark pink. They're most common on the face, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been sun damaged.
  • A family history of skin cancer. If one of your parents or a sibling has had skin cancer, you may have an increased risk of the disease.
  • A personal history of skin cancer. If you developed skin cancer once, you're at risk of developing it again. Even basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas that have been successfully removed can recur.
  • A weakened immune system. People with weakened immune systems have a greater risk of developing skin cancer. This includes people living with HIV/AIDS or leukemia and those taking immunosuppressant drugs after an organ transplant.
  • Exposure to certain substances. Exposure to certain substances, such as arsenic, may increase your risk of skin cancer.
  • Increasing age. The risk of developing skin cancer increases with age, primarily because many skin cancers develop slowly. The damage that occurs during childhood or adolescence may not become apparent until middle age. Still, skin cancer isn't limited to older people and can occur at any age.


 


Some statistics:


www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/race....




Most skin cancers are caused by the sun, and Aryans are affected the most, by far.

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