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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 4:55AM #21
u.r.vibrant
Posts: 25

I practice the faith of Christian Science. To me, religion is a religious pracitice, although society commonly juxtaposes religion with church attendance and rituals. Christian Science plays an important role in my life, which counteracts the religion of, say, shopping!


The system of divine healing as explained by Christian Science has helped me experience God's finished good work.


As for Scripture and other religious textbooks, I appreciate and learn from them immensely. However, I feel we readers (no matter how authortative or amateur) are only interpreters, therefore it is important that every individual meditate and receive their own spiritual interpretation.


Healing Science Today

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 19, 2010 - 9:51AM #22
Marcion
Posts: 2,883

Organized religion plays no part in my life.

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 20, 2010 - 9:44AM #23
Aussiesoul
Posts: 311

I am a Catholic Christian . I attend church a handful of times a year. I do not interpret scriptures in a literal way, but recognise they have important messages to teach us. I agree with many church teachings, especially the value of all human life, however i disagree with some such as the banning of artificial birth control and the condemnation of homosexuality. I recognise that other beliefs and religions also possess wisdom and insight which we can learn from. I do not recognise that there is only one path to God or ultimate truth.


Aussiesoul

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 23, 2010 - 2:36PM #24
ExPluribusUnum
Posts: 61

What role does religion play in your life?


Religion is pretty central to my life, and everything I am and do is an expression of that.


Do you believe in the absolute historical accuracy and authority of your religious text(s)?


I believe that all religious texts are representations of a people’s attempt to understand themselves and the universe they inhabit.  They are true inasmuch as any story illustrates its truth, and need not be literal in order to have meaning.  In this sense, the text has only as much authority as is given it by the reader, who must find some resonance with it.  The question of “absolute historical accuracy” is therefore moot.


Is it just a cultural thing for you, something you were raised with and identify yourself as, but otherwise don't care much about?


No.  I actually “converted” in my late teens/early twenties, and my religious identity is very important to me.


Do you participate in your religion because it gives you comfort and strength? Or maybe a sense of community and belonging?


Both.  It also provides me with opportunities to fulfill my own human potential, a challenge to help others fulfill their potential, and a safe framework within which to struggle with “the big questions”.


Do you feel like you're fulfilling a destiny of some kind by carrying out the teachings of your religion?


I feel like am doing the best I can to comprehend existence and to improve our experience of it.  If that moving toward wholeness and holiness is “destiny”, then I must answer yes.  If by destiny you mean something like “the inevitability of fate”, then I would say no.


I welcome you to state your religion when answering, if you feel comfortable doing so.


I am a Unitarian Universalist.


UUA.org

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 23, 2010 - 6:55PM #25
Heterodoxus
Posts: 145

I read a quote earlier today, forgot where, that said in effect:


To most believers, a sacred book is like a software license. Nobody actually reads it. They just skip to the end and indicate “I agree” or "I disagree".

One of the first duties of a Christian theologian should be to remind people to not read the Bible.
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4 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2010 - 2:21PM #26
mainecaptain
Posts: 21,786

Aug 23, 2010 -- 6:55PM, Heterodoxus wrote:


I read a quote earlier today, forgot where, that said in effect:


To most believers, a sacred book is like a software license. Nobody actually reads it. They just skip to the end and indicate “I agree” or "I disagree".




You know,.....I think you are right

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side. Aristotle
Never discourage anyone...who continually makes progress, no matter how slow. Plato..
"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives" Jackie Robinson
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4 years ago  ::  Aug 27, 2010 - 3:21PM #27
RenGalskap
Posts: 1,420

Aug 23, 2010 -- 6:55PM, Heterodoxus wrote:

To most believers, a sacred book is like a software license. Nobody actually reads it. They just skip to the end and indicate "I agree" or "I disagree"


I think this is part of what is sometimes called the "Tragedy of the Theologian"; no one's belief exactly matches what theologians say they should believe.

One explanation is that people tend to rely on concepts that are easy to grasp and think about, while the "correct" theological ideas are cognitively costly, which is the scientific way of saying that thinking about them may make your head hurt. :-)

For example, the intuitive way to relate to god is to think of him as part of your social group. It's intuitive for people to believe that god supports their football team, political party, army, nation, etc. The idea that god doesn't favor one social group over another is harder to relate to, and even seminary graduates have trouble with it.

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 28, 2010 - 3:52AM #28
Jm8
Posts: 784
> The idea that god doesn't favor one social group over another is harder to relate to

I envy no one, nor am I partial to anyone. I am equal to all. But whoever renders service unto Me in devotion is a friend, is in Me, and I am also a friend to him. (Bhagavadgita 9.29)

Hare Krsna
Your servant, bh. Jan

www.vrindavan-dham.com
www.veda.harekrsna.cz

dvaitaM bandhAya mokSAt prAk prApte bodhe manISayA
bhaktyarthaM kalpitam dvaitaM advaitAd api sundaram

"Duality is bondage before moksa and wisdom after realization. The duality accepted for the purpose of bhakti is sweeter than even non-duality." (from mangalacarana to Advaitasiddhi sara sangraha by Madhusudana Sarasvati, former advaitin)
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4 years ago  ::  Aug 28, 2010 - 7:09PM #29
RenGalskap
Posts: 1,420

Aug 28, 2010 -- 3:52AM, Jm8 wrote:

I envy no one, nor am I partial to anyone. I am equal to all. But whoever renders service unto Me in devotion is a friend, is in Me, and I am also a friend to him. (Bhagavadgita 9.29)


An excellent example of something that people skip over and just indicate "I agree" or "I disagree", as Heterodoxus put it. Or as I put it, something that people have trouble relating to.

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 29, 2010 - 1:50AM #30
Jm8
Posts: 784
Namaste Ren,

which part do you consider troublesome to relate to? The friendly part? It's amply elaborated on in Vedic sastras starting with the famous two bird analogy found in Rgveda samhita 1.164.20-22, Mundaka Up. 3.1.1-2, and Svetasvatara Up. 4.6-7: dvA suparNA sayujA sakhAyA, where sakhAyA means friends.

Hare Krsna
Your servant, bh. Jan

www.vrindavan-dham.com
www.veda.harekrsna.cz

dvaitaM bandhAya mokSAt prAk prApte bodhe manISayA
bhaktyarthaM kalpitam dvaitaM advaitAd api sundaram

"Duality is bondage before moksa and wisdom after realization. The duality accepted for the purpose of bhakti is sweeter than even non-duality." (from mangalacarana to Advaitasiddhi sara sangraha by Madhusudana Sarasvati, former advaitin)
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