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Switch to Forum Live View role of religion in your life
5 years ago  ::  Nov 23, 2009 - 6:20PM #1
Intotheblue
Posts: 265

What role does religion play in your life?


 


Do you believe in the absolute historical accuracy and authority of your religious text(s)? Is it just a cultural thing for you, something you were raised with and identify yourself as, but otherwise don't care much about? Do you participate in your religion because it gives you comfort and strength? Or maybe a sense of community and belonging? Do you feel like you're fulfilling a destiny of some kind by carrying out the teachings of your religion?


 


I welcome you to state your religion when answering, if you feel comfortable doing so.


 


Thanks.

Namaste.

.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~.~*~

"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

"Be the change you wish to see in the world."

"It is not our differences that divide us, but our inability to accept and celebrate those differences."
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2009 - 12:29PM #2
Ruhi19
Posts: 535

I am a Baha'i.  The Baha'i Faith influences many decisions that I make and most actions (when I slow down enough to let it).  My religion has influenced how I raise my children.  I became a Baha'i shortly before my marriage and I have been a Baha'i for over 30 years. 


I do believe in the historical accuracy and authority of the Baha'i Writings.  We are blessed to be the first religion whose Scripture is written by either the Prophet or His secretary and verified by the Prophet after transcription.  If it wasn't written down or approved in writing, then it is not authoritative.  We are aided in that the Baha'i Faith is fairly recent as far as religions go.  It was co-founded by The Bab (an Arabic title meaning the Gate) in 1844 and by Baha'u'llah (an Arabic title meaning the Glory of God) in 1853. 


The question about culture is difficult. Since it is young, Baha'i "culture" is still being developed.  Further, there are very few rituals so that the cultural input of each locality is predominant.  An example:  a Baha'i marriage ceremony is conducted when two people say:  "We will all, verily, abide by the Will of God." Anything else added to the ceremony (dress, manner of appearing among the witnesses [i.e., walking down an aisle, with the father of the bride or with the groom, entering from the side, being seated before the audience comes in, etc.], any music, speeches, readings, et al.) are all dependant upon the desires and/or local culture of the participants. 


The Baha'i Faith certainly gives me comfort especially in times of need and strength to endure when things are difficult. 


The Baha'i Faith teaches that the religions of God are all one religion in which God has progressively revealed knowledge about Himself and about His plan for humanity: the establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth through the acknowledgement of the unity of mankind.  To reach this objective, He has sent special People (Prophets or Manifestations), Who have revealed God's Word to humanity.  There have been many such Manifestations.  Those of Whom we still have a record include Krishna, Buddha, Moses, Zoroaster, Jesus, Muhammad, The Bab and Baha'u'llah.  These are the Founders of specific religions which still exist today. 


Each religion which has been founded has fostered the development and civilization of humanity within its reach.  Each of these religions and civilizations have all prepared humanity for this Day in which humanity is now growing out of its turbulent adolescence and into maturity, ready for the promised Day in which peace can be established if we want it.  See The Promise of World Peace:  info.bahai.org/article-1-7-2-1.html


 

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2009 - 1:01PM #3
lsbutch
Posts: 339

Raised in the protestant religions, I struggled early in life to find the basic beliefs which I could find that lifted my understanding, Love, and joy.  I do not adhere to any organized religion, because they separate humanity into groups, those that follow their doctrine and those that do not, and this does not resonate within my being as truth.  Organized religion views Source as separate from humanity, nature, and states that judgement by Source is to be feared, and that Source is only revealed through their interpretation of their written text. 


 My journey has shown me that Source Energy is within ALL physical plane existence, and demands nothing to receive the blessings of Love within this physical existence.  Everything that exist within this physical plane, exist with the flow of Source Energy (Love) and is an eternal part of the whole of ALL.  There is no judgement by Source Energy, we humans hold judgements only, but Love has no need to judge and does not desire anything to walk or think or believe in any particular manner in order to be part of the flow of Source Energy within the Universe.  Human issues are self made, most because humans do not allow themselves to find Love within their own beings for all existence.  This refusal to Love everything is a reflection of our fears, egos, and issues of lack of self worth.  When a human can find their connection within their own beings, heart, the need to fear and find differences to separate from each other, nature, begins to vanish within their hearts, minds, and intelligence, and unconditional Love grows.  Our relationship with one another, with nature, and within Ourselves, is our best teacher for finding our path toward allowing Ourselves to see, understand and accept ALL as worthy and part of Source Energy.


Following an organized religion may work for those who need to encouragement to seek within themselves, but often becomes a crutch that inhibits their personal insight into their own journey of acceptance of ALL as part of Source.  Just my humble opinion, and everyone is somewhere along the road back to Source.  Namaste'


Butch

Whatever the question Love is the answer
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 25, 2009 - 7:15PM #4
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663

Well keep in mind that there are more perspective in the world than "believers" and "non-believers", Christianity is not the only horse in the race, so to speak.

Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 28, 2009 - 3:32AM #5
Jm8
Posts: 784

> Do you believe in the absolute historical accuracy and authority of your religious text(s)?


Yes besides passages in Vedic scriptures identified by acaryas as inaccurate.


> Is it just a cultural thing for you, something you were raised with and identify yourself as, but otherwise don't care much about?


No.


> Do you participate in your religion because it gives you comfort and strength? Or maybe a sense of community and belonging?


Out of necessity, realizing my position as the eternal son of Sri Krsna. Participation is like a family gathering.


> Do you feel like you're fulfilling a destiny of some kind by carrying out the teachings of your religion?


No, performing a freewill choice. Sri Krsna tells Arjuna that he can be His tool (BG 11.33), i.e. to serve Him voluntarily. Everyone has this choice.



Hope this helps. Hare Krsna

Your servant, bh. Jan, a candidate for becoming a Vaisnava

www.vrindavan-dham.com
www.veda.harekrsna.cz

kAmyopAsana yArthayanty anudinaM kincit phalaM svepsitam,
kecit svargam athApavargam apare yogAdi yajnAdibhiH,
asmAkaM yadunandanAMghri yugala dhyAnAvadhAnArthinAm,
kiM lokena damena kiM nRpatinA svargApavargaizca kiM?

"Those who waste their time for the attainment of celestial joys or
liberation are fools! I do not want any of that! I only desire to remain
engrossed in the sweet remembrance of the lotus feet of Lord Krishna. What
is the need for heaven or mukti to prema bhaktas of the Lord?" (Adi
Sankaracarya, Prabodha sudhakara, Anugrahika prakaranam 150)

Moderated by Beliefnet_grace on Jun 01, 2010 - 09:27AM
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2009 - 2:39PM #6
Silenicus
Posts: 35

What role does religion play in your life?


 


Do you believe in the absolute historical accuracy and authority of your religious text(s)?


Our relgious texts are of various sorts. I don't think that any of them where written from an objective historic point of view. Some of our text deal with history, others with a-historical myth (narritives of origins, etc.) others are short stories, poetry, philosophy, and so forth.


As for authority, I adopt the view of Rabbi M. Kaplan. "The past gets a vote, not a veto."


Is it just a cultural thing for you, something you were raised with and identify yourself as, but otherwise don't care much about?


I care very much about my religion and culture.


Do you participate in your religion because it gives you comfort and strength?


In part.


Or maybe a sense of community and belonging?


That too.


Do you feel like you're fulfilling a destiny of some kind by carrying out the teachings of your religion?


I feel that my religion and culture have much to offer the world so that by practicing them, I help keep a piece of the world's heritage alive, as do other peoples when they maintain their own religions and cultures.


I also believe that the Universe is evolving and that there will be a place in it for intelligent species which acheive a sustainable culture. Whether ours will be one of those or whether we will be an evolutionary dead end, I can't say. If the latter, none of our sacred books, religious practices, or cultures count for very much.


I welcome you to state your religion when answering, if you feel comfortable doing so.


 I'm Jewish. My practice is Reform. Philosophically, I tend to cosmism and skepticism (i.e. uncertainty).


Thanks.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Nov 30, 2009 - 9:14PM #7
John4
Posts: 1

I believe religion is an important aspect of life. Everyone has a unique understanding and a unique relationship with God. Religion gives me strength and a clear perspective on how to interpret the things. I believe religion plays a countercyclical role in my life. It keeps me and my desires in balance. If I get angry, I remember that I should control my anger, If I desperately want something worldly, I remember that there will be the Hereafter, If I ignore everything worldly and want to live a seperate life alone, I remember that I should be a part of the society and be an active member of the society. I am sure you know Rumi and his sufi tradition. It more focuses on self discipline and spirituality and I believe religion plays a role in my life if and only if I have self discipline. If you are already familiar with Sufism I recommend these two articles.


fethullahgulenconference.org/oklahoma/re...


fethullahgulenconference.org/houston/rea...

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5 years ago  ::  Dec 01, 2009 - 2:38PM #8
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663

 


What role does religion play in your life?


My religions and cultural values are at the centre of who I am, so central would be the role.


Do you believe in the absolute historical accuracy and authority of your religious text(s)?


Neither, as there are no specific texts within my religion which are held to be only religious. There are tales and accounts of the Gods and heroes which are not understood to be historic, but are understood to be true.


Is it just a cultural thing for you, something you were raised with and identify yourself as, but otherwise don't care much about?


It is certainly cultural, but I was not raised as a Gaelic Reconstructionist Polytheist. It is something which I gradually grew into. The cultural aspects are just as central as the religious ones.


Do you participate in your religion because it gives you comfort and strength? Or maybe a sense of community and belonging?


It does provide a source of inspiration and strength, surely, but these are not the only reasons. It provides some degree of community, albeit predominantly in an electronic form as the members of my particular tradition are geographically scattered.


Do you feel like you're fulfilling a destiny of some kind by carrying out the teachings of your religion?


Perhaps? I chose to respond to a particular set of ethics, beliefs and deities, but they had a hand in it as well. I wouldn't call it destiny, just what I chose to do and believe.


 


 

Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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5 years ago  ::  Dec 02, 2009 - 5:19AM #9
Jm8
Posts: 784

Namaste gorm sionnach,


> There are tales and accounts of the Gods and heroes which are not understood to be historic, but are understood to be true.


I guess more readers than just me wonder about this. Could you please elaborate?


Afaik, all traditional lore gets its authority from being  factual and remembered as that.


In Vedic tradition, which is quite close to the Celtic one, the scriptures are classified into two groups - shruti ('that which is heard ') and smriti ('that which is remembered '). When understood directly and literally (mukhya vritti), which is the primary and major way to understand them (the other way, metaphorical, gauna vritti, being supplementary), they are considered historical but not in the modern sense, as recorded by some human erring historian. They are called apaurusheya ('of nonhuman origin', i.e. revealed).


Your servant, bh. Jan


www.vrindavan-dham.com
www.veda.harekrsna.cz

kAmyopAsana yArthayanty anudinaM kincit phalaM svepsitam,
kecit svargam athApavargam apare yogAdi yajnAdibhiH,
asmAkaM yadunandanAMghri yugala dhyAnAvadhAnArthinAm,
kiM lokena damena kiM nRpatinA svargApavargaizca kiM?

"Those who waste their time for the attainment of celestial joys or
liberation are fools! I do not want any of that! I only desire to remain
engrossed in the sweet remembrance of the lotus feet of Lord Krishna. What
is the need for heaven or mukti to prema bhaktas of the Lord?" (Adi
Sankaracarya, Prabodha sudhakara, Anugrahika prakaranam 150)

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5 years ago  ::  Dec 02, 2009 - 12:49PM #10
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663

Dec 2, 2009 -- 5:19AM, Jm8 wrote:


Namaste gorm sionnach,


> There are tales and accounts of the Gods and heroes which are not understood to be historic, but are understood to be true.


I guess more readers than just me wonder about this. Could you please elaborate?


Afaik, all traditional lore gets its authority from being  factual and remembered as that.


In Vedic tradition, which is quite close to the Celtic one, the scriptures are classified into two groups - shruti ('that which is heard ') and smriti ('that which is remembered '). When understood directly and literally (mukhya vritti), which is the primary and major way to understand them (the other way, metaphorical, gauna vritti, being supplementary), they are considered historical but not in the modern sense, as recorded by some human erring historian. They are called apaurusheya ('of nonhuman origin', i.e. revealed).


Your servant, bh. Jan


www.vrindavan-dham.com
www.veda.harekrsna.cz

kAmyopAsana yArthayanty anudinaM kincit phalaM svepsitam,
kecit svargam athApavargam apare yogAdi yajnAdibhiH,
asmAkaM yadunandanAMghri yugala dhyAnAvadhAnArthinAm,
kiM lokena damena kiM nRpatinA svargApavargaizca kiM?

"Those who waste their time for the attainment of celestial joys or
liberation are fools! I do not want any of that! I only desire to remain
engrossed in the sweet remembrance of the lotus feet of Lord Krishna. What
is the need for heaven or mukti to prema bhaktas of the Lord?" (Adi
Sankaracarya, Prabodha sudhakara, Anugrahika prakaranam 150)




In the instance of Irish myths, what we have are literary creations ceated by medieval scribes. Irish (and arguably Celtic cultures in general) were oral societies, so tales and myths were passed from generation to generation orally and it was not until after the conversion of the Irish to Christianity and the shift from an oral to literary culture, that the tales were first written. As they exists now, they are Christianized forms of the original myths, scholarship and even a cursory examination of the texts reveals how much of what is written did refelct pre-Christian beliefs, but many of the divine aspects of the Gods as they are described are reduced to a large degree. As such, what is writen does refelct those eariler beliefs to some degree, but they are not literal transcriptions of the myths.


Another way to look at it, is that myths are not always to be taken as literal, and often encompass the use of alegory and metaphor, instead of historic veracity. We do not take the accounts as the literal history of our Gods, but they are a close approximation and a decent way of learning about the character of them (if the pitfalls of their actual transcription are understood).

Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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