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4 years ago  ::  Jul 11, 2010 - 5:14PM #41
TPaine
Posts: 9,380

Jul 11, 2010 -- 4:09PM, Eagle-1 wrote:


It will come.  I'm  not  denying  it  happens.   I'm  a  long-time continuing victim myself, and my whole family.    Yes,  there's always  been  terrorism of various  kinds.



One act of terrorism that gets little publicity today other than the 1960 film staring Kirk Douglas was the Roman response to the Third Servile War better known as Spartacus led slave rebellion of 73-71 BCE. The Romans crucified the 6000 slaves who survived the final battle in a line that stretched from Rome to Capua along the Appian Way. The purpose was to terrorize the slaves who did not rebel and it worked.

"The genius of the Constitution rests not in any static meaning it might have had in a world that is dead and gone, but in the adaptability of its great principles to cope with current problems and current needs." -- Justice William Brennan: Speech to the Text and Teaching Symposium at Georgetown University (October 12, 1985)
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4 years ago  ::  Jul 12, 2010 - 11:55AM #42
Eagle-1
Posts: 494

Yikes.  Man's inhumanity to man can be really  amazing.  


Have you  ever  personally  been terrorized, had a bad experience?  

Eagle
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4 years ago  ::  Jul 12, 2010 - 4:19PM #43
TPaine
Posts: 9,380

Jul 12, 2010 -- 11:55AM, Eagle-1 wrote:


Yikes.  Man's inhumanity to man can be really  amazing.  


Have you  ever  personally  been terrorized, had a bad experience?



I've had my share of bad experiences, but I can't remember ever being terrorized. Maybe we have different definitions of the word.

terrorize –verb (used with object), -ized, -iz·ing.
1. to fill or overcome with terror.
2. to dominate or coerce by intimidation.
3. to produce widespread fear by acts of violence, as bombings.

—Synonyms
1, 2. See frighten.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2010.


terror –noun

1. intense, sharp, overmastering fear: to be frantic with terror.
2. an instance or cause of intense fear or anxiety; quality of causing terror: to be a terror to evildoers.
3. any period of frightful violence or bloodshed likened to the Reign of Terror in France.
4. violence or threats of violence used for intimidation or coercion; terrorism.
5. Informal . a person or thing that is especially annoying or unpleasant.

—Synonyms
1.  alarm, dismay, consternation. Terror, horror, panic, fright  all imply extreme fear in the presence of danger or evil. Terror  implies an intense fear that is somewhat prolonged and may refer to imagined or future dangers: frozen with terror. Horror  implies a sense of shock at a danger that is also evil, and the danger may be to others rather than to oneself: to recoil in horror. Panic  and fright  both imply a sudden shock of fear. Fright  is usually of short duration: a spasm of fright. Panic  is uncontrolled and unreasoning fear, often groundless, that may be prolonged: The mob was in a panic.

—Antonyms
1.  calm.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2010.


 

"The genius of the Constitution rests not in any static meaning it might have had in a world that is dead and gone, but in the adaptability of its great principles to cope with current problems and current needs." -- Justice William Brennan: Speech to the Text and Teaching Symposium at Georgetown University (October 12, 1985)
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4 years ago  ::  Jul 12, 2010 - 9:41PM #44
Xristocharis
Posts: 5,051

We should probably remember that the Apocalypse isn't a period in future history, but more-or-less the name for a genre of literature.


Both Daniel and the Apocalypse of John are apocalypses. Sometimes Ezekiel is included too.


But in the Second Temple Period and early Christian era there were a lot of apocalypses, a couple even nearly made it into the Christian Canon.


The Apocalypse of Peter rivaled the popularity of the John's and in some cases was regarded as canonical when John's wasn't.


"We receive only the apocalypses of John and Peter, though some of us are not willing that the latter be read in church." - Muratorian Fragment


The Apocalypse of Paul, an late expansion on the Apocalypse of Peter.


There are two gnostic apocalypses, one of Peter and one of Paul with no relation to the aforementioned apocalypses.


The Shepherd of Hermas also, which was among the disputed books--for some it was scripture and for others not scripture; the Muratorian Fragment describes it as good to be read but not fit to be read publically in the churches since it was too late to be counted among the Prophets or among the Apostles.


The three books of Enoch, of which 1 Enoch (often just called the Book of Enoch) is the most widely known and also which enjoyed much popularity in antiquity (it is quoted verbatim by Jude in his epistle) and is to be found in the traditional Canons of the Ethiopian (Tawahedo) Church.


We also have an apocalypse of Abraham, of Adam, of Elijah, of Sedrach, the Apocalypse of Esdras, ad nauseum.


I would probably argue that a more appropriate term, instead of Apocalypse, to refer to "the End" is to say the Eschaton. Eschaton being the Greek for "last things" and which is the basis of the school of theology known as eschatology.


To that end, I don't believe the Eschaton to be a brutal, ugly or bad thing. I view it with hope, whereby God will make all things right, where real justice reigns and victims and their oppressors may be reconciled in love, peace and authentic mercy. I look forward to the future resurrection of the dead and the restoration of all things. I long for peace, I hope for the day when we have all forgotten war and violence and have turned our swords and spears into plowshares and pruning shears.


As far as a hopeful Apocalypse, this comes from the Apocalypse of Peter and has always fascinated me,


"And my Lord answered me and said to me: 'Hast thou understood that which I said unto thee before? It is permitted unto thee to know that concerning which thou askest: but thou must not tell that which thou hearest unto sinners lest they transgress the more, and sin.' ... 'My Father will give unto them all the life, the glory, and the kingdom that passeth not away,' ... 'It is because of them that have believed in me, that, at their word, I shall have pity on men.'"

In other words, at the request of the saints in heaven Jesus, who has been given all authority by God His Father, will give mercy and grace to all who suffer in Hell.

-Jon

"When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." - Dom Hélder Câmara
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