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Switch to Forum Live View Welcome to the Faith Transitions board!
7 years ago  ::  Oct 23, 2007 - 5:02PM #1
Sacrificialgoddess
Posts: 9,496
Welcome to the Faith Transitions board! Are you in the midst of changing religions?  Have to converted to another religion in the past?  Do you need advice?  Tell us here!  :)
Dark Energy. It can be found in the observable Universe. Found in ratios of 75% more than any other substance. Dark Energy. It can be found in religious extremists, in cheerleaders. To come to the conclusion that Dark signifies mean and malevolent would define 75% of the Universe as an evil force. Alternatively, to think that some cheerleaders don't have razors in their snatch is to be foolishly unarmed.

-- Tori Amos
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 05, 2007 - 8:59PM #2
Kullervo
Posts: 10
I figured this forum was right up my alley given that I'm in the middle of a lengthy, confusing, and difficult faith transition.

My wife, my brother, his wife, and I have all been in the process of leaving Mormonism for the past two years.  We're all pretty much firmly "out" now (I haven't formally resigned from the Mormon church yet, but for all intents and purposes it's a done deal), but in the aftermath, figuring out what I really do believe has been difficult, challenging, confusing, and frustrating.

I've chronicled much of it on my religion blog (link in my sig), but sometimes it just seems like I'm nowhere and not in danger of getting anywhere anytime soon.  Sometimes I feel like Mormonism has left me spiritually crippled, like how an abuse victim can have serious trust and relationship issues later in life.

Anyway, just saying hello.
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6 years ago  ::  Jan 03, 2008 - 4:24PM #3
friedlinemike
Posts: 1
I think belief and faith are often confused.  Belief is rational.  It's based on experience and knowledge.  But if we have a God beyond our understanding than our beliefs are not enough.  Faith is what takes us beyond belief. 

Job's experience -- losing family, wealth,a nd health -- do not match his beliefs about God and he is thrown into a spiritual crises.  Yet he holds onto his faith -- "Though he slay me, yet will I hope in him" (Job 13:15).   Because of that hope he continually seeks out God (the seocnd half of the verse is "I will surely defend my ways to his face") rather than trying to sort out his beliefs.  His friends keep trying to impose their beliefs on Job, but he will have none of it.  Finally God comes.  But rather than brinking answers, he comes with questions.  I hink the questions are God's way of revealing himself to job. Of course, if God comes with questions how can we ever know the answers?  At some point in the barrage of questions, Job understands.  He realizes he has a God beyond understanding and he becomes comfortable with that unknowing.  He repents( chapter 42).  He turns from a relationship based on belief "My ears had heard of you" to one based on the face to face experience of God "but now my eyes of have seen you." 

If I had time to share my testimony, then you would see how my actions have always preceeded my belief. 

Belief is based on answers, which makes it very satisfying.  Faith is based on questions, which makes it very uncomfortable at times.  But faith has the greater reward.  If we only rely on belief than we keep God at a distance because belief is based on what we hear.  But faith brings us face to face with God.

I have just started a log about faith which you may want to read.
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 06, 2008 - 4:29PM #4
lily4God
Posts: 18
I was raised Roman Catholic, and left the church around age 15 after my confirmation. I dabbled with wicca, withcraft, and paganism in general for a couple years, and was into all of the new age and astrology practices. When I was 17, I realized I need God in my life, but I could not accept Jesus. I decided to convert to Orthodox Judaism (yes, quite the radical change), and studied for 6+ years. I needed to move away, and did, but had to come home right away because of the family I was to live with (let's just say that that particular family was not what I expected). I fought with my spirituality when I returned home. I still believed in God with all my heart, but I didn't know where he wanted me. Recently, (though I have been struggling with the idea for awhile), I have come to accept Jesus Christ as my Lord and Saviour, and am a revert to Christianity (though I consider myself a new Christian). I will not return to the RCC though. My beliefs most costly match those of the Anabaptists, though there aren't any of said churches around here.

God bless,
~Lily~
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 27, 2008 - 1:06PM #5
RevKeithWright
Posts: 137
I came  to this particular thread based on the teaser about the changing faith of America: abandoning the faith of our "childhood."

It's about time.

First.  I believe taking children to church and teaching them ONLY about YOUR faith is akin to indoctrination and should be considered a form of child abuse.  This is in contrast to the Unitarian Universalists which expose the youth in their religious education program to ALL religions so that when they become ADULTS, they may make the decision as to what THEY believe in; for themselves.

To force an individual, yes, a child IS an individual, to believe in what you believe is the same thing as MAKING them go to the college which you went to and /or making them choose YOUR profession and MAKE them marry the person you have arranged for them to marry.  Wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong!

Instead of indoctrination into your church, you should teach them critical thinking skills which will enable them to use logic and reason to examine the beliefs presented to them instead of waking up one day to the fact that they don't believe in what they were raided to believe.  Do you realize that this revelation affects how they feel about their parents and trust?  As children, they believe in what adults tell them..so, when THEY are able to think for themselves, they see through the deception and fmay feel resentment and anger for being misled.

In cases where the child asks serious questions about the rationality of revealed religions, the effects can be truly devestating (as in my case...I am STILL angry at myself for trusting others and what they told be about Christianity and failed to use logic and reason to test my faith.)

I am pleased to see that people are asking themselves questions and seeking answers as to what it is they believe.

I can't tell you how many hundreds of emails I get from people who discovered that they were Deists after being this or that for their entire lives and feel this sense of contentment for the first time in their lives because they have finally found  a religion which they can truly believe in and have faith for the first time in their lives...rather than lie to themselves because of social or familial concerns.

Bravo, people...bravo!
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 01, 2008 - 10:27PM #6
adlewis
Posts: 5
I'm really glad to have found this forum, since I'm currently in the process (going on about 3 years now) of reevaluating my current religious affiliation and whether it truly fits with my beliefs and everyday encounters with life. I say "reevaluate," but, really, I never gave my birth religion that close a look, mostly because, even today, I wholly respect it and a great many of its practitioners, including my family. The question isn't whether there's anything wrong with my current religion; the question is whether I actually BELIEVE in what it supports or if my personal faith is more congruent with another system.

At any rate, I am taking this slow, keeping this personal, and making sure it is genuine. I cannot admit to being a wholly spiritual guy to begin with -- my life is a very secular one. Nevertheless, I still feel that twinge when someone asks me my opinion on my religion and it largely sounds contradictory to what I actually feel. Of course, it might require a sharper step towards a more integrated religious life, I recognize that, but I truly need to look before I leap...

At any rate, it's a pleasure to take part in the forum.
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2008 - 8:17AM #7
gillyflower
Posts: 5,325
How do you feel about the god of the religion? You can find a sect/tradition/denomination in just about any faith that will fall in line with something you believe but if you have problems with the god then I think that you would need to look at another religion.
Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones. Marcus Aurelius
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2008 - 8:22AM #8
Sacrificialgoddess
Posts: 9,496

gillyflower wrote:

How do you feel about the god of the religion? You can find a sect/tradition/denomination in just about any faith that will fall in line with something you believe but if you have problems with the god then I think that you would need to look at another religion.





I would have thought this was obvious.  :)  I guess not.  :o

Dark Energy. It can be found in the observable Universe. Found in ratios of 75% more than any other substance. Dark Energy. It can be found in religious extremists, in cheerleaders. To come to the conclusion that Dark signifies mean and malevolent would define 75% of the Universe as an evil force. Alternatively, to think that some cheerleaders don't have razors in their snatch is to be foolishly unarmed.

-- Tori Amos
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