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Switch to Forum Live View Mealworms Will Eat Up Our Styrofoam Waste
3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2015 - 10:59AM #1
MMarcoe
Posts: 20,907

Cool.


 


 


Could mealworms solve our plastic problem?


Researchers at Stanford University have finally figured out a partial answer to the world’s plastics problem: mealworms.


Mealworms, the larvae form of darkling beetles, can apparently subsist on a diet of foamed polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, with no ill effects to their system, thanks to special bacteria in their guts. This could be very hopeful news in light of the amount of Styrofoam and other petroleum-based plastics we consume: Americans throw away 25 billion Styrofoam cups every year, and they will not decompose for thousands of years.


"Our findings have opened a new door to solve the global plastic pollution problem," said Dr. Wei-Min Wu, a lead researcher on the study, in a press release.


www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/0930/...



1. Extremists think that thinking means agreeing with them.
2. There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.
3. God is the original nothingness of the universe.
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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2015 - 1:31PM #2
in_my_opinion
Posts: 4,107

Oct 1, 2015 -- 10:59AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Cool.


 


 


Could mealworms solve our plastic problem?


Researchers at Stanford University have finally figured out a partial answer to the world’s plastics problem: mealworms.


Mealworms, the larvae form of darkling beetles, can apparently subsist on a diet of foamed polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, with no ill effects to their system, thanks to special bacteria in their guts. This could be very hopeful news in light of the amount of Styrofoam and other petroleum-based plastics we consume: Americans throw away 25 billion Styrofoam cups every year, and they will not decompose for thousands of years.


"Our findings have opened a new door to solve the global plastic pollution problem," said Dr. Wei-Min Wu, a lead researcher on the study, in a press release.


www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/0930/...






Yay! Now to find various fish and/or invertebrates to harbor the bacterium that can live in the gyre centers which collect billions of tons of plastic flotsam at the centers of each of our oceans!

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2015 - 3:53PM #3
MMarcoe
Posts: 20,907

Oct 1, 2015 -- 1:31PM, in_my_opinion wrote:


Oct 1, 2015 -- 10:59AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Cool.


 


 


Could mealworms solve our plastic problem?


Researchers at Stanford University have finally figured out a partial answer to the world’s plastics problem: mealworms.


Mealworms, the larvae form of darkling beetles, can apparently subsist on a diet of foamed polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, with no ill effects to their system, thanks to special bacteria in their guts. This could be very hopeful news in light of the amount of Styrofoam and other petroleum-based plastics we consume: Americans throw away 25 billion Styrofoam cups every year, and they will not decompose for thousands of years.


"Our findings have opened a new door to solve the global plastic pollution problem," said Dr. Wei-Min Wu, a lead researcher on the study, in a press release.


www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/0930/...






Yay! Now to find various fish and/or invertebrates to harbor the bacterium that can live in the gyre centers which collect billions of tons of plastic flotsam at the centers of each of our oceans!




That's next on the list, it seems.


I love how the simpler solutions often present themselves when we overlook them.


1. Extremists think that thinking means agreeing with them.
2. There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.
3. God is the original nothingness of the universe.
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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2015 - 4:40PM #4
in_my_opinion
Posts: 4,107

Oct 1, 2015 -- 3:53PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Oct 1, 2015 -- 1:31PM, in_my_opinion wrote:


Oct 1, 2015 -- 10:59AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Cool.


 


 


Could mealworms solve our plastic problem?


Researchers at Stanford University have finally figured out a partial answer to the world’s plastics problem: mealworms.


Mealworms, the larvae form of darkling beetles, can apparently subsist on a diet of foamed polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, with no ill effects to their system, thanks to special bacteria in their guts. This could be very hopeful news in light of the amount of Styrofoam and other petroleum-based plastics we consume: Americans throw away 25 billion Styrofoam cups every year, and they will not decompose for thousands of years.


"Our findings have opened a new door to solve the global plastic pollution problem," said Dr. Wei-Min Wu, a lead researcher on the study, in a press release.


www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/0930/...






Yay! Now to find various fish and/or invertebrates to harbor the bacterium that can live in the gyre centers which collect billions of tons of plastic flotsam at the centers of each of our oceans!




That's next on the list, it seems.


I love how the simpler solutions often present themselves when we overlook them.





+1

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2015 - 8:40PM #5
mountain_man
Posts: 44,029

And when you're done, you can add a cup, or so, of dry roasted mealworms to your favorite cookie recipe. Or just eat them, dry roasted, fried in garlic butter or, as I like, fried in olive oil.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.   Isaac Asimov
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3 years ago  ::  Oct 08, 2015 - 10:43AM #6
Merope
Posts: 14,591

This thread was moved from the Hot Topics Zone.

Merope | Beliefnet Community Manager
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3 years ago  ::  Oct 10, 2015 - 3:57AM #7
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Oct 1, 2015 -- 1:31PM, in_my_opinion wrote:


Oct 1, 2015 -- 10:59AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Cool.


 


 


Could mealworms solve our plastic problem?


Researchers at Stanford University have finally figured out a partial answer to the world’s plastics problem: mealworms.


Mealworms, the larvae form of darkling beetles, can apparently subsist on a diet of foamed polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, with no ill effects to their system, thanks to special bacteria in their guts. This could be very hopeful news in light of the amount of Styrofoam and other petroleum-based plastics we consume: Americans throw away 25 billion Styrofoam cups every year, and they will not decompose for thousands of years.


"Our findings have opened a new door to solve the global plastic pollution problem," said Dr. Wei-Min Wu, a lead researcher on the study, in a press release.


www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/0930/...





Yay! Now to find various fish and/or invertebrates to harbor the bacterium that can live in the gyre centers which collect billions of tons of plastic flotsam at the centers of each of our oceans!




You'd probably want to develop a whole array of critters to compose a complete little gyre ecology.


Though the people who are adapting sea plants to cling to all that plastic and generate floating islands may be a bit disappinted with this approach.....

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 10, 2015 - 3:59AM #8
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Oct 1, 2015 -- 3:53PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Oct 1, 2015 -- 1:31PM, in_my_opinion wrote:


Oct 1, 2015 -- 10:59AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Cool.


 


 


Could mealworms solve our plastic problem?


Researchers at Stanford University have finally figured out a partial answer to the world’s plastics problem: mealworms.


Mealworms, the larvae form of darkling beetles, can apparently subsist on a diet of foamed polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam, with no ill effects to their system, thanks to special bacteria in their guts. This could be very hopeful news in light of the amount of Styrofoam and other petroleum-based plastics we consume: Americans throw away 25 billion Styrofoam cups every year, and they will not decompose for thousands of years.


"Our findings have opened a new door to solve the global plastic pollution problem," said Dr. Wei-Min Wu, a lead researcher on the study, in a press release.


www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/0930/...






Yay! Now to find various fish and/or invertebrates to harbor the bacterium that can live in the gyre centers which collect billions of tons of plastic flotsam at the centers of each of our oceans!




That's next on the list, it seems.


I love how the simpler solutions often present themselves when we overlook them.





Just as a caution, what if spreading this bacterium to a bunch of species ends up it changing so it can live in the open environment, and then we have to develop defenses so all our plastics don't get eaten and pretty much screw up civilization?

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