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Switch to Forum Live View Oliver Sacks Dead at 82
3 years ago  ::  Aug 30, 2015 - 7:50PM #1
SeraphimR
Posts: 12,687


Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and acclaimed author who explored some of the brain’s strangest pathways in best-selling case histories like “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat,” using his patients’ disorders as starting points for eloquent meditations on consciousness and the human condition, died on Sunday at his home in Manhattan. He was 82.


The cause was cancer, said Kate Edgar, his longtime personal assistant.



www.nytimes.com/2015/08/31/science/olive...


May his memory be eternal.

“So long as there is squalor in the world, those obsessed with social justice feel obliged not only to live in it themselves but also to spread it evenly.”

http://takimag.com/article/the_ugly_truth_theodore_dalrymple
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 30, 2015 - 10:52PM #2
Merope
Posts: 14,591

Not unexpected, but still very sad.  A great loss.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 31, 2015 - 2:33AM #3
rocketjsquirell
Posts: 19,045

May his memory be a blessing.


Here is a nice rememberance by one of Dr. Sack's cousins.


He saw beyond the illnesses into the souls of his patients


. . .


If given the chance to eulogize Sacks, Aumann said he would note his cousin’s celebrated empathy and sensitivity.

“He was very sensitive to people and he had an understanding of people – especially people with difficulties,” he said.

“He saw beyond the illnesses – he saw into the souls of his patients. His main activity in life was being a physician and helping his patients.”

Additionally, Aumann said Sacks “had a tremendous knack for writing.”

“He was a writer,” he said.

“He was able to take these cases and to make them live in his books. That was his special ability. There were a lot of physicians around, lots of neurologists around, but none of them knew how to write like Oliver.”

It was Sacks’s ability to connect with his patients on a profound level, and help them through their seemingly insurmountable struggles, that truly made his cousin great, Aumann concluded.

“He related to them like human beings, not like cases,” he said.

While Aumann said he was not comfortable revealing the details of their final conversation, he did discuss the powerful final sentence Sacks wrote in “Sabbath”: “I find my thoughts drifting to the Sabbath, the day of rest, the seventh day of the week and perhaps the seventh day of one’s life as well, when one can feel that one’s work is done, and one may, in good conscience, rest.”

Asked if Sacks achieved his goal of finally resting “in good conscience,” Aumann was unequivocal.

“Oh yeah, oh yeah,” he said. “He definitely did. He was a tremendously influential figure.”


www.jpost.com/Diaspora/He-saw-beyond-the...

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 31, 2015 - 1:27PM #4
shmuelgoldstein
Posts: 3,014

Aug 30, 2015 -- 7:50PM, SeraphimR wrote:

Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and acclaimed author ...



Sad, but 'never heard of 'im. 

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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2015 - 7:54AM #5
Merope
Posts: 14,591

This thread was moved from the Hot Topics Zone.

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