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Switch to Forum Live View Dr Carl Wieland retires after four decades
3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2015 - 8:56AM #21
Blü
Posts: 26,191

iama


Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,”


Cripes, imagine me siding with Paul!


Yes, eschew false 'knowledge' and stick to science.


Nothing matches scientific method when the question's What's true in reality?


One day you should try it.


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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2015 - 10:31AM #22
d_p_m
Posts: 11,236

Mar 4, 2015 -- 10:00PM, iamachildofhis wrote:


iama:  According to Dr. Carl Wieland it is the "choir" that CMI is desiring to reach!




In other words, he's selling snake oil to the suckers.

"If you aren't confused by quantum physics, you haven't really understood it."
― Niels Bohr

"As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality."
-- Albert Einstein

"If one is going to engage with the primordial forces of darkness, one must expect a bit of social awkwardness."
-- Penny Dreadful, season one, episode two
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2015 - 11:47AM #23
MMarcoe
Posts: 20,907

Mar 5, 2015 -- 9:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 12:06PM, upsala81 wrote:


1Ti 6:20-21 O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith. Grace be with you.



 More evidence that YECers don't study the Bible. Or can you tell me what that verse is actually about?




It begins with a silent G.




Silent nowadays.  I took a course in old ENglish literature where the professor insisted we learn to contort our faces and throats to enunciate the once-spoken initial consonants g and k.  The hardest part was learning to actually hear it, because our ears aren't accustomed to those subtle sounds.




Did your professor speak any Old English to you? A few of mine did, and I thought it sounded cool.


There are Youtube videos showing people speaking it.


1. Extremists think that thinking means agreeing with them.
2. There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.
3. God is the original nothingness of the universe.
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2015 - 12:37PM #24
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Mar 6, 2015 -- 11:47AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 9:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 12:06PM, upsala81 wrote:


1Ti 6:20-21 O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith. Grace be with you.



 More evidence that YECers don't study the Bible. Or can you tell me what that verse is actually about?




It begins with a silent G.




Silent nowadays.  I took a course in old English literature where the professor insisted we learn to contort our faces and throats to enunciate the once-spoken initial consonants g and k.  The hardest part was learning to actually hear it, because our ears aren't accustomed to those subtle sounds.




Did your professor speak any Old English to you? A few of mine did, and I thought it sounded cool.


There are Youtube videos showing people speaking it.




Tonnes of ye olde tongue!


The phrase "yon gnarled oake" sticks in my mind; when the final consonant of a word formed a diphthong with what we call a "silent" g or k, the g or k got pronounced subtly, so the above phrase sounded like "yong narl doke".


We also learned that "ye olde" doesn't actually use a y, but a now-vanished letter "thorn" -- which we should have kept, IMHO, instead of the false diphthong "th" which replaced it.


Anyway... I think my favorite part of the class was that twice a week he'd read poetic sections to us from Wycliffe's Bible tranlsation, as it would have been read back in the day.  The Beatitudes were awesome!

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2015 - 12:39PM #25
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Mar 6, 2015 -- 8:56AM, Blü wrote:


iama


Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,”


Cripes, imagine me siding with Paul!


Yes, eschew false 'knowledge' and stick to science.


Nothing matches scientific method when the question's What's true in reality?


One day you should try it.




You should side with Paul, because on this point the warning to Timothy covers YEC dogma.

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2015 - 2:24PM #26
MMarcoe
Posts: 20,907

Mar 6, 2015 -- 12:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 11:47AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 9:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 12:06PM, upsala81 wrote:


1Ti 6:20-21 O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith. Grace be with you.



 More evidence that YECers don't study the Bible. Or can you tell me what that verse is actually about?




It begins with a silent G.




Silent nowadays.  I took a course in old English literature where the professor insisted we learn to contort our faces and throats to enunciate the once-spoken initial consonants g and k.  The hardest part was learning to actually hear it, because our ears aren't accustomed to those subtle sounds.




Did your professor speak any Old English to you? A few of mine did, and I thought it sounded cool.


There are Youtube videos showing people speaking it.




Tonnes of ye olde tongue!


The phrase "yon gnarled oake" sticks in my mind; when the final consonant of a word formed a diphthong with what we call a "silent" g or k, the g or k got pronounced subtly, so the above phrase sounded like "yong narl doke".


We also learned that "ye olde" doesn't actually use a y, but a now-vanished letter "thorn" -- which we should have kept, IMHO, instead of the false diphthong "th" which replaced it.


Anyway... I think my favorite part of the class was that twice a week he'd read poetic sections to us from Wycliffe's Bible tranlsation, as it would have been read back in the day.  The Beatitudes were awesome!




It sounds like you are describing Middle English rather than Old English.


Here's a video with a guy speaking the Lord's Prayer in Old English:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=EE71znjuba4




1. Extremists think that thinking means agreeing with them.
2. There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.
3. God is the original nothingness of the universe.
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 07, 2015 - 12:44AM #27
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Mar 6, 2015 -- 2:24PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 12:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 11:47AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 9:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 12:06PM, upsala81 wrote:


1Ti 6:20-21 O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith. Grace be with you.



 More evidence that YECers don't study the Bible. Or can you tell me what that verse is actually about?




It begins with a silent G.




Silent nowadays.  I took a course in old English literature where the professor insisted we learn to contort our faces and throats to enunciate the once-spoken initial consonants g and k.  The hardest part was learning to actually hear it, because our ears aren't accustomed to those subtle sounds.




Did your professor speak any Old English to you? A few of mine did, and I thought it sounded cool.


There are Youtube videos showing people speaking it.




Tonnes of ye olde tongue!


The phrase "yon gnarled oake" sticks in my mind; when the final consonant of a word formed a diphthong with what we call a "silent" g or k, the g or k got pronounced subtly, so the above phrase sounded like "yong narl doke".


We also learned that "ye olde" doesn't actually use a y, but a now-vanished letter "thorn" -- which we should have kept, IMHO, instead of the false diphthong "th" which replaced it.


Anyway... I think my favorite part of the class was that twice a week he'd read poetic sections to us from Wycliffe's Bible tranlsation, as it would have been read back in the day.  The Beatitudes were awesome!




It sounds like you are describing Middle English rather than Old English.


Here's a video with a guy speaking the Lord's Prayer in Old English:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=EE71znjuba4





I suppose technically it was Middle English, in language.  Maybe they divide literature and language differently?


Anyway, this isn't quite the way I recall it, but close:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=FM2THezuzlI

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2015 - 8:28AM #28
Midutch
Posts: 5,975

Mar 6, 2015 -- 2:24PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 12:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 11:47AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 9:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 12:06PM, upsala81 wrote:


1Ti 6:20-21 O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith. Grace be with you.



 More evidence that YECers don't study the Bible. Or can you tell me what that verse is actually about?




It begins with a silent G.




Silent nowadays.  I took a course in old English literature where the professor insisted we learn to contort our faces and throats to enunciate the once-spoken initial consonants g and k.  The hardest part was learning to actually hear it, because our ears aren't accustomed to those subtle sounds.




Did your professor speak any Old English to you? A few of mine did, and I thought it sounded cool.


There are Youtube videos showing people speaking it.




Tonnes of ye olde tongue!


The phrase "yon gnarled oake" sticks in my mind; when the final consonant of a word formed a diphthong with what we call a "silent" g or k, the g or k got pronounced subtly, so the above phrase sounded like "yong narl doke".


We also learned that "ye olde" doesn't actually use a y, but a now-vanished letter "thorn" -- which we should have kept, IMHO, instead of the false diphthong "th" which replaced it.


Anyway... I think my favorite part of the class was that twice a week he'd read poetic sections to us from Wycliffe's Bible tranlsation, as it would have been read back in the day.  The Beatitudes were awesome!




It sounds like you are describing Middle English rather than Old English.


Here's a video with a guy speaking the Lord's Prayer in Old English:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=EE71znjuba4



Wow. Couldn't understand most of what he said, even with the text translation.


To me it sounded Danish or very thick Frisian. Many years ago in Amsterdam, I met a man from Groningen who, when he spoke his Frisian dialect, I couldn't understand either, but he sounded very similar to the man in the video. The pacing, lilt and flow of the language were almost identical. Of course, he may have been speaking slower so that the stupid "Amsterdammer" could (sort of) understand him.

"creationism" ... 2000+ years worth of ABYSMAL FAILURE ... and proud of it.
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2015 - 10:08AM #29
MMarcoe
Posts: 20,907

Mar 12, 2015 -- 8:28AM, Midutch wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 2:24PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 12:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 11:47AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 9:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Mar 5, 2015 -- 12:06PM, upsala81 wrote:


1Ti 6:20-21 O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith. Grace be with you.



 More evidence that YECers don't study the Bible. Or can you tell me what that verse is actually about?




It begins with a silent G.




Silent nowadays.  I took a course in old English literature where the professor insisted we learn to contort our faces and throats to enunciate the once-spoken initial consonants g and k.  The hardest part was learning to actually hear it, because our ears aren't accustomed to those subtle sounds.




Did your professor speak any Old English to you? A few of mine did, and I thought it sounded cool.


There are Youtube videos showing people speaking it.




Tonnes of ye olde tongue!


The phrase "yon gnarled oake" sticks in my mind; when the final consonant of a word formed a diphthong with what we call a "silent" g or k, the g or k got pronounced subtly, so the above phrase sounded like "yong narl doke".


We also learned that "ye olde" doesn't actually use a y, but a now-vanished letter "thorn" -- which we should have kept, IMHO, instead of the false diphthong "th" which replaced it.


Anyway... I think my favorite part of the class was that twice a week he'd read poetic sections to us from Wycliffe's Bible tranlsation, as it would have been read back in the day.  The Beatitudes were awesome!




It sounds like you are describing Middle English rather than Old English.


Here's a video with a guy speaking the Lord's Prayer in Old English:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=EE71znjuba4



Wow. Couldn't understand most of what he said, even with the text translation.


To me it sounded Danish or very thick Frisian. Many years ago in Amsterdam, I met a man from Groningen who, when he spoke his Frisian dialect, I couldn't understand either, but he sounded very similar to the man in the video. The pacing, lilt and flow of the language were almost identical. Of course, he may have been speaking slower so that the stupid "Amsterdammer" could (sort of) understand him.




Old English came from northern Germany. It arrived in England in 449 AD when the Anglo-Saxons settled there.


Also, it is closely related to West Frisian.


1. Extremists think that thinking means agreeing with them.
2. There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.
3. God is the original nothingness of the universe.
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2015 - 12:01AM #30
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Mar 12, 2015 -- 10:08AM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 12, 2015 -- 8:28AM, Midutch wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 2:24PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Mar 6, 2015 -- 12:37PM, Roymond wrote:


Tonnes of ye olde tongue!


The phrase "yon gnarled oake" sticks in my mind; when the final consonant of a word formed a diphthong with what we call a "silent" g or k, the g or k got pronounced subtly, so the above phrase sounded like "yong narl doke".


We also learned that "ye olde" doesn't actually use a y, but a now-vanished letter "thorn" -- which we should have kept, IMHO, instead of the false diphthong "th" which replaced it.


Anyway... I think my favorite part of the class was that twice a week he'd read poetic sections to us from Wycliffe's Bible tranlsation, as it would have been read back in the day.  The Beatitudes were awesome!




It sounds like you are describing Middle English rather than Old English.


Here's a video with a guy speaking the Lord's Prayer in Old English:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=EE71znjuba4



Wow. Couldn't understand most of what he said, even with the text translation.


To me it sounded Danish or very thick Frisian. Many years ago in Amsterdam, I met a man from Groningen who, when he spoke his Frisian dialect, I couldn't understand either, but he sounded very similar to the man in the video. The pacing, lilt and flow of the language were almost identical. Of course, he may have been speaking slower so that the stupid "Amsterdammer" could (sort of) understand him.




Old English came from northern Germany. It arrived in England in 449 AD when the Anglo-Saxons settled there.


Also, it is closely related to West Frisian.




You beat me to it.


I forget when the Danes terrorized the Isles as well as how much influence that had.

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