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Switch to Forum Live View Interesting creature...
8 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2010 - 6:43PM #1
thefish
Posts: 1,533

This article is a very interesting read.  www.msnbc.msn.com/id/34824610/ns/technol...


My question is for creationists.  What KIND is this creature?


Thanks in advance...


Peace


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8 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2010 - 6:52PM #2
EarthScientist
Posts: 3,449

Scientists aren't yet sure how animals actually appropriate genes they need


 


Subtitles like that are creo-viagra.


 


 

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8 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2010 - 7:08PM #3
Abner1
Posts: 6,624

Earthscientist wrote:


> Subtitles like that are creo-viagra.


A perverted mixture of creo-estrogen, creo-viagra, and spanish creo-fly.


Last summer I was reading an article about that sea slug appropriating chloroplasts from algae that was quite interesting, but the bit about it appropriating photosynthesis genes as well was new.  Thanks for bringing it up!

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8 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2010 - 8:18PM #4
Ken
Posts: 33,858

Jan 12, 2010 -- 6:43PM, thefish wrote:

What KIND is this creature?



The photosynthesizing sea slug kind?

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8 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2010 - 10:10PM #5
Oncomintrain
Posts: 3,516

That IS fascinating, thanks for posting. I've occasionally wondered whether it might be possible to "infect" animals with chloroplasts (having, like mitochondria, their own separate DNA), and whether animals could readily harvest the energy they gather. Seems such a thing is at least conceivable.


Imagine what it could do for the problem of world hunger if people could partially feed themselves, simply by standing in the sun.


 


It would also be fascinating to follow the long-term evolution of this species, to see whether it becomes more plantlike in other ways. Being able to take in nourishment through its skin without moving, it would seem natural that such a species might (over a very long time) lose its mobility in exchange for the benefit of thicker, more protective cell walls (as -- I gather -- did early plants). A hypothesis I wish I'd be around long enough to test.

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8 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2010 - 10:47PM #6
MMarcoe
Posts: 20,907

This organism seems to be a hybrid of different kinds. It's as though it evolved out of one kind and into another.


Soon we'll be creating organisms like these. Then the creos will have their last defense demolished; they will see with their own eyes that macroevolution is possible.


Then they shall weep and wish their ideology had never been born.

1. Extremists think that thinking means agreeing with them.
2. There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.
3. God is the original nothingness of the universe.
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 11, 2015 - 12:13AM #7
Roymond
Posts: 3,779

Jan 12, 2010 -- 10:10PM, Oncomintrain wrote:


That IS fascinating, thanks for posting. I've occasionally wondered whether it might be possible to "infect" animals with chloroplasts (having, like mitochondria, their own separate DNA), and whether animals could readily harvest the energy they gather. Seems such a thing is at least conceivable.


Imagine what it could do for the problem of world hunger if people could partially feed themselves, simply by standing in the sun.




My first zoology professor advocated for research to genegineer humans with carotinoids and betalains because they would fit with human skin color -- we'd all be a bit red-orange.  Ne noted that besides the food aspect, it would help redress the issue of all the CO2 we humans dump into the atmosphere.

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