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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 1:29PM #1
MELLOVEUK33
Posts: 9
Can Anyone Help Me ,can You Give Me Some Or Any  Information Or An Explanaton  On How The 5th Dimension Works.i Am So Intrigued With It All,how Many Dimensions Is There And How Do They All Work Together.thank You,it Will Be Much Appreciated.x
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 2:22PM #2
Ridcully
Posts: 3,745

MELLOVEUK33 wrote:

Can Anyone Help Me ,can You Give Me Some Or Any Information Or An Explanaton On How The 5th Dimension Works.i Am So Intrigued With It All,how Many Dimensions Is There And How Do They All Work Together.thank You,it Will Be Much Appreciated.x




You might try reading this Wiki article on String Theory: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_theory

"Things just happen, what the hell."  Didactylos
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 30, 2008 - 3:11PM #3
Bob_Bennett
Posts: 916
Hi,

We are preparing to move up into the 5th dimension and the best places to learn about it are in the monthly newsletters from channeled sources.

Start with Jeshua thru Judith Coates, at www.oakbridge.org.     
Then try Archangel Michael thru Ronna Herman, at www.ronnastar.com
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 12, 2008 - 5:36PM #4
Don't_Be_Captious
Posts: 1,035
Blu, your wry humor does often make me giggle or snicker.

On the 2nd half of Blu's description of the OP question, that's a good question.  The only decent answer I've ever found is that anything beyond the 1st 4 dimensions, is just a "mathematical description."  On top of that, there are the discrepancies between the specific mathematical definition of "dimension" and the many more informal, natural-language meanings of "dimension."  But as to the former, "mathematical description," the 5th dimension and on are, effectively, what falls out of the math when physicists, operating from known, accepted laws of mathematical physics, work out lots of physics problems.  It seems no-one can actually describe what a 5th dimension or beyond "looks" like.

In a roundabout way, this makes sense; since "what it looks like" depends on (1) vision, and (2) shape.  Vision is a physiological sense given us by evolution by natural selection in a 4-D world of 3 space dimensions and 1 time dimension.  "Shape" is an abstract notion again given us by evolution in a world of 3 spatial dimensions.  So, clearly, asking "What a 5th dimension looks like" is overwhelmingly biased by our limitations in 4 dimensions.

The book Flatland from the 1880's or so uses metaphor to illustrate the problem.  Imagine you lived, not in our world of 3 spatial dimensions of height, length, & width, but instead somehow lived in a 2-dimensional world of length & width, only: Flatland.  If some 3-dimensional creature visited your world, you couldn't perceive them, except in "slices."  If they sort of passed through your world, you'd only see portion of their body that your world's physics permits you to see.  By analogy, any creature or object from a higher-dimension universe would only be perceived in small part by us, if it passed through our world (if it could pass through at all).

I've known about this metaphor for years, but it remains frustrating.  It seems to me if physicists really knew what they're talking about, they could explain it much more descriptively & accurately than this, all this hand-waving & reference to metaphor & poetry.



btw, fwiu, most String Theory has it that there could be either 10, 11, or up to 26 (28?) dimensions, including our 4 of spacetime.  The most popular currently seems to be 11.  The 11th dimensions contains 10-D "membranes" (in "M-Theory," for "membrane"); these 10-D membranes crash together every few trillion years; these collisions are Big Bangs, and individual universes are created.  Thus, according to this theory, there are "many" individual universes (including our own) interspersed within the 11-D space ("Multiverse").  Each universe's 10 dimensions are changed by the collision/Big Bang:  Many of the dimensions curl up into ultra-tiny Superstrings, and go on to constitute that universe's particles, atoms, matter & energy.  Other dimensions remain "large" or macro-sized; those are that universe's dimensions.  In the case of our own universe, we have 3 large spatial dimensions and 1 large time dimension:  The 4 dimensions of spacetime.  In theory, those are the conditions necessary for physical law to occur as we know them.  But under this theory, many other universes would exist which have strange, bizarre configurations of large dimensions:  Some like Flatland, with only 2 space dimensions, for example; or some with 2 time dimensions, and hence all events are completely random, and no deterministic physics can occur.  Or no time dimension at all, and literally nothing happens.  etc.  Under M-Theory, or 11-D Multiverse with 10-D membranes, there are 9 or 10 different dimensions of space, and 1 or 2 different dimensions of time.

Whatever that means.



I just looked at the OP poster's profile.  I suspect Blu's skepticism was justified, and I just blew 20 minutes typing all that out.
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 15, 2008 - 6:02AM #5
Wulf
Posts: 109
What something would look like in a 1 dimensional world. Everything would exist on a line and you could see only a point.
In a 2 dimensional world everything would exist on a plane and all you could see is are lines.
In a 3 dimensional world everything exists in space and what you can see are shapes.
Thats as far as I can visualize but a 4th dimension would consist of multiple spaces and if you want to add time to the definition then 4 dimensions allows you to see movement.
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 16, 2008 - 7:30AM #6
Somebodyelse
Posts: 517
Everybody knows THIS is what the Fifth Dimension looks like:

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6 years ago  ::  Aug 16, 2008 - 8:07AM #7
Don't_Be_Captious
Posts: 1,035
[QUOTE=Wulf;692607]What something would look like in a 1 dimensional world. Everything would exist on a line and you could see only a point.
In a 2 dimensional world everything would exist on a plane and all you could see is are lines.
In a 3 dimensional world everything exists in space and what you can see are shapes.
Thats as far as I can visualize but a 4th dimension would consist of multiple spaces and if you want to add time to the definition then 4 dimensions allows you to see movement.[/QUOTE]

It's interesting that we "actually" see 3-D shapes as a 2-D "flat" image out in front of us.  That's why computer & television images, and photographs, appear natural, as we see things in reality, even though they're on 2-D surfaces.

Also, we take the 4th dimension, time, for granted.  We "see" it as motion.  But as many philosophers have pointed out, we don't actually "see" the motion itself; we remember what we just saw, we project into the future what we'll see, and so we "see," for example, a javelin flying through the air, even though at every discrete moment of perception, we only see the javelin where it is at that given moment.

This would apply in 2-D & 1-D universes, if they perceived time at all.  Just as our 3-D universe is actually 4-D, so a 2-D universe would be "2-D" spatially, but have what is our 4th dimension as its 3rd dimension; and a 1-D would have a 2nd dimension of time, etc.

So, in general, a universe with time & perception (conception!) of motion, would perceive 1 dimension less than its spatial dimensionality.  3-D universe (ours) perceives (visually) in 2-D; 2-D universe sees in 1-D (a line, as wulf points out); and a 1-D universe sees in 0-D (a point, which is the "Zeroeth Dimension").

I can imagine how a 2-D observer will notice motion (time, the 4th dimension) in his "line of sight."  But I can't imagine how a 1-D observer can notice motion in a 0-D field of vision?  There wouldn't be "anywhere to go" for any object in his vision range (which is a mere point).


So, by extrapolation, we could guess that a 5th-dimensional observer -- or should I more accurately say a 4th-dimensional observer, since we call ourselves 3-D observers, who perceive time as motion, not spatially, as we perceive the other dimensions -- a 4th-dimensional observer, would perceive our universe, roughly the way Einstein & other physicists graphically, ideally picture it:  As a Block Universe, that is, with the beginning of the universe (the Big Bang), on, say, the left side; the end of the universe (the Big Crunch), on the right side; and all historical events in the universe's life represented from past-to-future, left-to-right.  Each thinnest "slice," up & down, of the Block Universe represents a single moment of the universe's history; in other words, all events everywhere in the 3-D universe, represented by a 2-D plane.  (Though I don't understand how a single, objective such moment exists, when the complications of Special Relativity & time dilation are accounted for.)

In other words, according to the physicists' theory of the Block Universe, an observer existing in one higher-dimensional plane than us, will see our time dimension as a "space," much the way we see the 3rd dimension of "depth."

So for them, apparently, the 5th dimension will be much as our 4th dimension, time.  But they will have an extra dimension of space, apparently.

The strangest thing to me about a space dimension beyond 3 is that Euclidean geometry defines space by defining straight lines that extend our forever.  One line is the 1st dimension.  A 2nd line, perpendicular to the 1st, forms a plane, and thus the 2nd dimension.  A 3rd line, perpendicular to the first 2 lines, forms a cube, and thus the 3rd dimension.  What I just can't grasp about extra spatial dimensions is that, by this definition, they should be somehow further perpendicular to all the preceding lines -- which is logically impossible in 3-D geometry.
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 16, 2008 - 8:20AM #8
Don't_Be_Captious
Posts: 1,035
[QUOTE=Blü;686823].
DBCaptious

It seems no-one can actually describe what a 5th dimension or beyond "looks" like

You’ll have seen computer-generated images of eg the tesseract (the ‘cube’ in four spatial dimensions), expressed as a projection onto three dimensions in the form of a stereoscopic pair of images, or as a single image (2D).

We can do the same thing with eg a ‘cube’ in five spatial dimensions &c.  The only one I’ve seen didn’t look very informative, but there it was.  I’m also told that just as you can get used to 4D figures if you manipulate their projections on a computer for long enough, so you can get used to 5D - but I’ve never seen even a basic 5D program for this.[/QUOTE]

Yes, I remember you writing about this before.  Thank you for the link.  I had never actually realized the tesseract was this.  I should read those Heinlein stories cited at the bottom of the article!

So, in effect, the hypercube (in this case, the 4-D hypercube/tesseract) that we see there is the "shadow" of the 4-D object's actual shape (much as a cube, square, & line are the "shadows" for lower-order dimensions)?
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 16, 2008 - 8:22AM #9
Don't_Be_Captious
Posts: 1,035
[QUOTE=Somebodyelse;694989]Everybody knows THIS is what the Fifth Dimension looks like:

[/QUOTE]

And they sound pretty good too!
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6 years ago  ::  Aug 16, 2008 - 8:37PM #10
Miguel_de_servet
Posts: 17,050

Somebodyelse wrote:

Everybody knows THIS is what the Fifth Dimension looks like:


Yes, but in another parallel-parallax Universe in the Multiverse, this is what it looks like:



MdS

Revelation is above, not against Reason

“The everlasting God is a refuge, and underneath you are his eternal arms ...” (Deut 33:27)
“Do you have an arm like God, and can you thunder with a voice like his?” (Job 40:9)
“By the Lord’s word [dabar] the heavens were made; and by the breath [ruwach] of his mouth all their host.” (Psalm 33:6)
“Who would have believed what we just heard? When was the arm of the Lord revealed through him?” (Isaiah 53:1)
“Lord, who has believed our message, and to whom has the arm of the Lord been revealed?” (John 12:38)
“For not the hearers of the law are righteous before God, but the doers of the law will be declared righteous.” (Romans 2:13)

“Owe no one anything, except to love one another, for the one who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law.”(Romans 13:8)
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