Post Reply
Page 1 of 10  •  1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10 Next
Switch to Forum Live View USDA employee resigns over racism scandal
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 12:47PM #1
Ironhold
Posts: 11,583

link

At a regional NAACP conference in March, a black woman working for the USDA admitted that she put less effort into assisting a white farmer than she would have put into assisting a minority farmer, and ultimately declared that she sent him to "one of his own kind" for assistance. After she made her remarks, the audience burst into laughter.

The NAACP is having a fit over this and has promised to reprimand the involved parties. The employee herself was forced into resigning yesterday afternoon when Fox News picked up on the footage, which had been uploaded to Youtube and ultimately went viral.


I've actually heard people argue over the years that it's impossible for women to be sexist or minorities to be racist, yet here we are with actual proof of such a thing taking place. What does this say about race relations in the US?

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:10PM #2
appy20
Posts: 10,165

If all were equal, I would be the first to condemn her.  As it stands, I cannot. I live in a rural area, keep up with agricultural media, events and orgs.  I have noticed in so many ag orgs, commissions or any group of people who come together to further ag interests are exclusively white.  I frequently watch an ag tv news show early in the morning, I have yet to see a black person on it, interviewed by it or as a participant in events.  That says to me, that the black farmer needs some equal footing somewhere. 


Fix the other inequalities, then I will squawk.

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:13PM #3
coachbob
Posts: 2,241

Jul 20, 2010 -- 1:10PM, appy20 wrote:


If all were equal, I would be the first to condemn her.  As it stands, I cannot. I live in a rural area, keep up with agricultural media, events and orgs.  I have noticed in so many ag orgs, commissions or any group of people who come together to further ag interests are exclusively white.  I frequently watch an ag tv news show early in the morning, I have yet to see a black person on it, interviewed by it or as a participant in events.  That says to me, that the black farmer needs some equal footing somewhere. 


Fix the other inequalities, then I will squawk.




Fix the inequalities by basing decisions on race?

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:33PM #4
appy20
Posts: 10,165

Jul 20, 2010 -- 1:13PM, coachbob wrote:


Jul 20, 2010 -- 1:10PM, appy20 wrote:


If all were equal, I would be the first to condemn her.  As it stands, I cannot. I live in a rural area, keep up with agricultural media, events and orgs.  I have noticed in so many ag orgs, commissions or any group of people who come together to further ag interests are exclusively white.  I frequently watch an ag tv news show early in the morning, I have yet to see a black person on it, interviewed by it or as a participant in events.  That says to me, that the black farmer needs some equal footing somewhere. 


Fix the other inequalities, then I will squawk.




Fix the inequalities by basing decisions on race?





As long as they are being decided by race, balance it.  When it is all balanced, then we can go all color blind.  No white farmer suffered a loss from this woman.  Chances are, no white farmer ever needed her help because there are so many watch groups watching his back negating any need he has to look to gov for help.  

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:34PM #5
Erey
Posts: 19,145

Suposidly there is some misleading about this story.  If that is the case and this Shirley has been wronged then we should aknowledge that.  If that is true then she probably has cause for litigation.


 


i really don't care that rural american is dominated by White people.  Why does that matter?  Blacks are only 13-15% of the population depending on what source you use.  I do care if blacks have the same opportunitites as other racial groups but it is silly to think there should be equal representation.  Because equal representation will look like fewer than one out of ten people being black.  In some states like in the North west the representation will look like almost none because there are some states where there are very, very few blacks. 


Do the blacks in the area actually want to belong to the organizations?  If they do then they should be given an opportuniy. Are they being deliberatly excluded?  If so then that must be addressed. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:39PM #6
allthegoodnamesweretaken
Posts: 11,634

Racism, sexism, classism, ageism, ect, are all alive and well.  Even if we want to push them below the surface and pretend like they don't exist. 


 


This just illustrates that. 


 


all

Yesterday, in America, 100 million gun owners did nothing.
Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:41PM #7
appy20
Posts: 10,165

Jul 20, 2010 -- 1:34PM, Erey wrote:


Suposidly there is some misleading about this story.  If that is the case and this Shirley has been wronged then we should aknowledge that.  If that is true then she probably has cause for litigation.


 


i really don't care that rural american is dominated by White people.  Why does that matter?  Blacks are only 13-15% of the population depending on what source you use.  I do care if blacks have the same opportunitites as other racial groups but it is silly to think there should be equal representation.  Because equal representation will look like fewer than one out of ten people being black.  In some states like in the North west the representation will look like almost none because there are some states where there are very, very few blacks. 


Do the blacks in the area actually want to belong to the organizations?  If they do then they should be given an opportuniy. Are they being deliberatly excluded?  If so then that must be addressed. 





I live in an area that is predominantly black.  Once again., let me repeat, I see ZERO blacks being represented.  


ZERO=NONE.  That is what no black people means.


Furthermore, if I deal with that woman, I am willing to bet,  I will be helped. I have never dealt with a black person in any governmental capacity that did not provide me with what I need.  She may HAVE HAD to help her black customers more.


Over the years, I worked in a town with 65% black people, i have had black supervisors, I have never had my race held against me.  


She may have exaggerated for her audience but I bet if her actual performance was reviewed, there wasn't any real discrepancy.


I promise you the white farmer is not being discriminated against.  One woman couldn't possibly do that.

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:42PM #8
Ebon
Posts: 10,148

She made a remark, admitting to racist behaviour in the course of her duties and was (rightfully, to my mind) effectively fired for it. I'm afraid I don't see a problem.

He who oppresses the poor shows contempt for their Maker, but whoever is kind to the needy honors God. ~ Proverbs 14:31

Fiat justitia, ruat caelum

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:46PM #9
appy20
Posts: 10,165

Jul 20, 2010 -- 1:42PM, Ebon wrote:


She made a remark, admitting to racist behaviour in the course of her duties and was (rightfully, to my mind) effectively fired for it. I'm afraid I don't see a problem.





That only leaves the predominantly racist employees, orgs, etc. still in place.  If someone who was depending on her actively complained about her, that would be different.  Based on something she said at a meeting, I think it is a bit much.

Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Jul 20, 2010 - 1:48PM #10
Erey
Posts: 19,145

Jul 20, 2010 -- 1:42PM, Ebon wrote:


She made a remark, admitting to racist behaviour in the course of her duties and was (rightfully, to my mind) effectively fired for it. I'm afraid I don't see a problem.





Well Ebon supposidly her full speech went on to say that she was all about race at that time.  I know I have met people like that before.  That she eventuallyl had plesant exchange with the farmer and his wife who were gratefull for her help.  And she told this story in what might be considered a brave effort to tell of her own racism in hopes that others would move beyond race as she (eventually) learned to do.  Basically she is saying I had these racial hang ups and I learned to move past them, let me tell you about this story with a white farmer.


If this is the case (cant verify myself) then a NAACP event would be appropriate for it.  And we probably need more people like her telling thier stories.

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 1 of 10  •  1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook