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5 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2009 - 9:29AM #1
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937
First I have a question: Should euthanasia be legalized? Why or why not? What, in your opinion are the advantages and disadvantages of legalizing it?

For me, I do not agree with euthanasia. Even though I disagree with it, I think that if someone wants to be euthanized and has a good reason for it (for example they have terminal cancer and are/ will suffer before they die because of it), then that is their choice and I wouldn't stand in the way of it. BUT legalizing it could pose some problems, in my opinion. Even if it was only legal for people with living will (which outlines the course of treatment that is to be taken by caregivers) who stated they wanted euthanasia (or no treatment in certain health/ medical situations), things might become tricky. Someone might get misdiagnosed with something terminal, such as ALS and decide to be euthanized before the disease really takes effect. It could also happen that the law(s) relating to euthanasia could evolve, to include various other situations in which euthanasia is legal. This could create situations where people who otherwise would not have been euthanized, would be euthanized (such as newborns with down syndrome who stop breathing). Imagine Chris Burke (the actor who played Corky on Life Goes On) had an added medical condition at birth that required immediate treatment, and his parents had chosen to do nothing (euthanasia)? If you think about how he turned out, that would have been a very bad decision. I remember watching a recent episode of ER in which a woman came to the hospital because she was having troubles relating to her cancer. Later in the episode it was discovered that she infact did not have cancer, but rather had a treatable infection and she would make a full recovery. Has such a person gone the euthanasia rute, it would have been a big mistake.  There is also a case I read about in a book where a patient with terminal cancer needed immediate attention. Her regular doctor was unavaliable so another doctor came to her aid. Upon his arrival, the sick patient said "lets get this over with." Instead of asking her or her mother (who was with the girl at the time) what was meant by what the patient said, the doctor went and got a syringe of medicine that was leathal enough to kill. He then gave it to the girl and she died. I believe that if euthanasia was legalized, more situations like this could occur. Doctors would have patients say things that sound as though they were asking for euthanasia (without directly asking for it), assume that euthanasia is what the patient wanted and then have them euthanized without making sure that is, infact what the patient wanted. I don't know why, but I believe it may be more likely that a doctor would make sure euthanasia is REALLY want a patient want before euthanizing someone if it is illegal rather then legal (maybe because they might get into additional trouble if the person had actually not wanted to be euthanized but was mistakenly and this was discovered). Overall I believe that making euthanasia legal would pose a lot of problems. Although at first I believe the law(s) would allow for only safe euthanasia (that is, only euthanasia of those with a living will stating that is what they want), I do believe eventually things might breakdown to allow for euthanasia of newborns born with birth defect(s) or of persons with significant mental handicaps (such as those wheelchair bound, and who cannot talk or really think for themselves) or the like. It could even, IMO come to the point if it is legalized where it would either be hard to keep doctors responsible euthanizing people who may not have truly wanted it in the first place or to keep doctors responaible in cases where the answer (did the patient truly want to be euthanized or not) is unclear.
JFG
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2009 - 9:41AM #2
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937
I should add something. Although I disagree with euthanasia, the only benefit of legalizing euthanasia is that it would allow people, like Sue Rodrigize (who faught to have euthanasie legalized in canada because she wanted it- due to the fact that she had ALS) who truly were terminally sick and suffering, to chose their own end.
JFG
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2009 - 2:38PM #3
DonTheNorski
Posts: 193
It would appear that you're speaking of several different things but calling them all the same thing.

Pertaining to the voluntary end of life for a medically diagnosed terminally ill patient, the Oregon Death With Dignity Act, http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ph/pas/, provides many safeguards against the abuses you mention.  I suggest you read all you can about the act on this, the official, website.

The rest of the situations you describe are eugenics, abuse of authority, or out and out criminal acts that are not possible under the terms of Oregon's Act.

It should be pointed out that the Oregon Death With Dignity Act is NOT "euthenasia", by its very definition.
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 19, 2009 - 1:46AM #4
Merope
Posts: 8,783
This thread was moved from "Christian-to-Christian Debate."

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 19, 2009 - 11:25AM #5
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937
Where was it moved to?
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 19, 2009 - 1:35PM #6
Tolerant Sis
Posts: 4,201
I am in favor of voluntary euthanasia for patients whose diagnoses suggest a terminal illness.  No one should be forced into it, obviously.

My husband and I and my eldest son all have living wills, and all of us, after watching the horrific leave-takings of some beloved family members, have decided that if we ever face the same or similar situations, we would want to be able to choose our own endings.

It is in fact nobody else's business.
First amendment fan since 1793.
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 19, 2009 - 3:41PM #7
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937
I don't totally agree Tolerant Sis. If someone's disgnosis only suggested a terminal illness that would also mean the possibility that it is also not terminal.
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 20, 2009 - 9:03AM #8
Peter_d_roman
Posts: 5,999

jesusfreakgal wrote:

First I have a question: Should euthanasia be legalized? Why or why not? What, in your opinion are the advantages and disadvantages of legalizing it?

For me, I do not agree with euthanasia. Even though I disagree with it, I think that if someone wants to be euthanized and has a good reason for it (for example they have terminal cancer and are/ will suffer before they die because of it), then that is their choice and I wouldn't stand in the way of it. BUT legalizing it could pose some problems, in my opinion. Even if it was only legal for people with living will (which outlines the course of treatment that is to be taken by caregivers) who stated they wanted euthanasia (or no treatment in certain health/ medical situations), things might become tricky. Someone might get misdiagnosed with something terminal, such as ALS and decide to be euthanized before the disease really takes effect. It could also happen that the law(s) relating to euthanasia could evolve, to include various other situations in which euthanasia is legal. This could create situations where people who otherwise would not have been euthanized, would be euthanized (such as newborns with down syndrome who stop breathing). Imagine Chris Burke (the actor who played Corky on Life Goes On) had an added medical condition at birth that required immediate treatment, and his parents had chosen to do nothing (euthanasia)? If you think about how he turned out, that would have been a very bad decision. I remember watching a recent episode of ER in which a woman came to the hospital because she was having troubles relating to her cancer. Later in the episode it was discovered that she infact did not have cancer, but rather had a treatable infection and she would make a full recovery. Has such a person gone the euthanasia rute, it would have been a big mistake.  There is also a case I read about in a book where a patient with terminal cancer needed immediate attention. Her regular doctor was unavaliable so another doctor came to her aid. Upon his arrival, the sick patient said "lets get this over with." Instead of asking her or her mother (who was with the girl at the time) what was meant by what the patient said, the doctor went and got a syringe of medicine that was leathal enough to kill. He then gave it to the girl and she died. I believe that if euthanasia was legalized, more situations like this could occur. Doctors would have patients say things that sound as though they were asking for euthanasia (without directly asking for it), assume that euthanasia is what the patient wanted and then have them euthanized without making sure that is, infact what the patient wanted. I don't know why, but I believe it may be more likely that a doctor would make sure euthanasia is REALLY want a patient want before euthanizing someone if it is illegal rather then legal (maybe because they might get into additional trouble if the person had actually not wanted to be euthanized but was mistakenly and this was discovered). Overall I believe that making euthanasia legal would pose a lot of problems. Although at first I believe the law(s) would allow for only safe euthanasia (that is, only euthanasia of those with a living will stating that is what they want), I do believe eventually things might breakdown to allow for euthanasia of newborns born with birth defect(s) or of persons with significant mental handicaps (such as those wheelchair bound, and who cannot talk or really think for themselves) or the like. It could even, IMO come to the point if it is legalized where it would either be hard to keep doctors responsible euthanizing people who may not have truly wanted it in the first place or to keep doctors responaible in cases where the answer (did the patient truly want to be euthanized or not) is unclear.
JFG


i agree that the option to help someone end there suffering is long over due in our society.

no one should be made to suffer or be made to live with suffering because some else thinks that that is the moral thing to do.

it is my personal prayer that all that would be made to experience what they require another to live with.

that being said- if a believer is willing to accept a doctors diagnosis as some thing more powerful then Our Fathers  Power to cure it - then that believer needs to ave there "personal believer radically "adjusted and without delay.

there was a time - about 2000 years or so ago- non-bible true faith in Gods Truth made all disease even death in the human being run.

maybe one day soon the bible will be put away and the power in that level of faith will return to us.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 20, 2009 - 9:38AM #9
Tolerant Sis
Posts: 4,201

jesusfreakgal wrote:

I don't totally agree Tolerant Sis. If someone's disgnosis only suggested a terminal illness that would also mean the possibility that it is also not terminal.


I don't actually care what you agree with, gal.  It's my life, it's my death, it's my decision.  Not yours.

First amendment fan since 1793.
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 20, 2009 - 4:24PM #10
solfeggio
Posts: 8,526
Tolerant Sis -
I agree with you that it is the individual's decision to make, and nobody else's.  I think that, where a person with a terminal illness is concerned, or even just somebody who doesn't want to live anymore for whatever reason, the person should be allowed to make whatever decision s/he wants.  It's his/her body, after all.  I don't think that suicide, assisted or not, is in any sense of the word a sin.
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