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Switch to Forum Live View Whose Life is it Anyway?
6 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2009 - 9:18AM #1
Omarkhayyam
Posts: 4,224
This case is an Italtan Terri Shvio.

Where does ANYBODY get the idea they can decide such personal questions for total strangers?:confused:

Talk about tryannry!
This is OZ? I want back to KS.

What was it? Click your heels together 3 times and say - what??
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6 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2009 - 2:20PM #2
solfeggio
Posts: 9,470
I don't know if it is tyranny so much as people wasting time worrying about an issue which is, after all, of very little importance.  The woman was in a coma and hovering between life and death for seventeen years.  If the family finally decided to pull the plug, who could possibly find a viable reason to challenge that?

It's one of those issues that makes the news for some reason, but which is pretty small potatoes in the great scheme of things.  I remember that Terri Shivo case and how the news media covered it obsessively for what seemed like weeks and weeks.  Didn't Bush even give his two cents' worth at some point?

On the other hand, total strangers give their opinions all the time on the right of a woman to have an abortion.  As long as all they do is talk, it doesn't matter.  But, if the right of a family to turn off life support, or the right of a woman to say what happens to her own body is taken away by the tyranny of the ignorant masses - well, that's a different story.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2009 - 6:18PM #3
John_T_Mainer
Posts: 1,658

Solf I don't think it is such a minor issue to those involved.  You and I are both living in countries where our wishes count, but that too can change.


 


It is a small world, and any infringement of human rights that gains legal acceptance in a first world country can quickly become the foundation for an attack on our own rights.


 

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 09, 2009 - 8:16PM #4
Tmarie64
Posts: 5,277

John's right... Our wishes count here... for now.   But not everywhere.


I know, from personal experience, that a Living Will is less useful than toilet paper in KY if ONE immediate family member protests it.  My mom had a living will.  When she had the stroke that killed her, my brother , living very close to her, and I, being the one she discussed EVERYTHING with, and having discussed this at length with her since her heart surgery told the doctors she wanted DNR in her records.  The doc said that would work UNLESS one of our siblings protested.  If ONE protested, in spite of the legal document, they would be forced to place her on life support and take any measure to keep her alive.


 

James Thurber - "It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers."
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2009 - 7:16PM #5
Tmarie64
Posts: 5,277

Yes, Vb, you're right.


She had a living will.  She had several notarized copies of it.  We made sure there were two in her records.  But the doctor told us it wouldn't matter if one of our siblings wanted to contest it.


I called the out of town brothers and sisters and told them that if they even THOUGHT about contesting the living will they would need a doctor of their own.

James Thurber - "It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers."
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 26, 2009 - 8:51PM #6
Wmdkitty
Posts: 2,174

It's another case of the Catholic Church deciding that it's her "duty" to suffer, instead of allowing her to rest in peace.

"The real reason that we can't have the Ten Commandments in a courthouse: You cannot post "Thou shalt not steal", Thou shalt not commit adultery" and "Thou shalt not lie" in a building full of lawyers, judges and politicians. It creates a hostile work environment." -- George Carlin
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6 years ago  ::  Apr 04, 2009 - 11:48AM #7
Eftekhar
Posts: 9

Mar 13, 2009 -- 7:16PM, Tmarie64 wrote:


Yes, Vb, you're right.


She had a living will.  She had several notarized copies of it.  We made sure there were two in her records.  But the doctor told us it wouldn't matter if one of our siblings wanted to contest it.


I called the out of town brothers and sisters and told them that if they even THOUGHT about contesting the living will they would need a doctor of their own.




 


I can kinda see the reasoning behind the law, removing life support is one of those things that you can't undo if you made a mistake.  I don't think it would be a good idea to remove the LS unless it was 100% decided by the family.  Ending LS or Assisted Suicide, if legalized should be hard to get done just because of the permentance of the decision.  I can't imagine the horror of a family that allowed for an Assisted Suicide only to later descover that the disease wasn't as bad as doctors thought, or a family had "pulled the plug" based on a misdiagnosis or a improperly done cat scan.


I know it is painful, but I think the alternative could very easily end up being worse.


 

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