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Switch to Forum Live View Elective Bible Classes In Public School
6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 3:32PM #101
DAH54
Posts: 3,318

Evillynnstar wrote:

I have no problem with this, however the Qur'an, the Torah (not the OT,) and ancient mythology should also be in this class well! I see nothing wrong with a class that teaches about common religions and their history.


When I last went to school, the schools I went to where all limited in what they taught. While in theory I have no objection to a school attempting to teach this subject. The theory that because it teaches Christianity it should teach all other religions is foolish, IMHO. No school teaches all theories/subjects in any field that I am aware of. My high school did not teach all subjects in science, nor in math, English, or sports. It seems to me having a school teaching some commonly accepted historical facts could well be beneficial.

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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 5:16PM #102
DAH54
Posts: 3,318

solfeggio wrote:

OK -
If nobody ever picked up and read a bible or holy book from any religion, ever, and everybody went about their lives never having read a religious book, would that REALLY be such a bad thing?


IMHO yes. Perhaps not for you, perhaps not for your friend, but if no one read any holy books then yes I believe it would be a very bad thing.


solfeggio wrote:

People don't perform good acts because they're thinking of the Ten Commandments.


I believe that is highly debatable, if not simply wrong if the concept here is to express the opinion that people don't do good things because of religious principles. Principles that they learn in part from reading and accepting Holy books.

solfeggio wrote:

We just try to do the right thing because our conscience tells us this. And we are born with a conscience. We don't get it from reading holy books.


We don't agree on what the right thing is, we don't all "know" we don't all believe we "know" what the right thing is. What is acceptable in society is constantly devolving, changing.

solfeggio wrote:

I think that, generally speaking, the countries in the world that are the most secular are the most successful. Keep religion out of the schools - all schools everywhere.


How do you define successful? I'm sure not all will agree with your definition, nor with the countries you claim are most successful. It's all just relative if you take God out of the equation, and no ones opinion is more valuable than anyone else's. That is the exact reason that some are working so hard on taking God out of the equation.



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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 8:15PM #103
Phøenix
Posts: 36
Others have probably said this, but I think teaching sacred texts is a great idea as long as they include the Koran, the Book of Mormon, the Vedas, L. Ron Hubbard's "Dianetics", and my personal favorite, the "Egyptian Book of the Dead", more correctly called the Book of Coming Forth By Day. Christianity is not to be given special treatment.
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 30, 2008 - 1:58PM #104
DAH54
Posts: 3,318

Evillynnstar wrote:

First the OT is greatly different than from the Torah.


Evillynnstar, do you understand what you are comparing here? Really understand, have you studied the Jewish religion?

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6 years ago  ::  Jul 31, 2008 - 8:18PM #105
DAH54
Posts: 3,318
If you are interested in a Jewish Bible may I suggest ArtScroll's The Stone edition of the Tanach. It is generally accepted as a valid translation, IMHO. I have found it a useful tool in my studies.

The Jewish equivalent of the Old Testament would be the Tanach, and not the Torah as the Torah technically is the five books of Moses: B'resheet, Sh'mot, Vayikra, B'midbar, D'varim (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy). As such there is no possibility that the Torah is the Old Testament as at best is is just a subset of the Old Testament.

It seems to me a fundamental question in any attempted teaching of Christianity is who is/was Jesus. A Christian's answer to this question will be fundamentally different than a Jewish answer to this question. The positions are mutually exclusive. IMHO the biases of the presenter are more likely to be apparent when one presenter must attempt to teach multiple faiths.

Paganism is a very personal religion, and I am curious who one would use as a reference to the teachings of Paganism. Many real Pagan ritual are oath bound to secrecy one must be initiated to gain access to the knowledge. If you want diversity I see Christianity and Paganism as a good combination, but again just what one would teach for Paganism would be very debatable, IMHO.


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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 3:32PM #106
DAH54
Posts: 3,318

Evillynnstar wrote:

I have no problem with this, however the Qur'an, the Torah (not the OT,) and ancient mythology should also be in this class well! I see nothing wrong with a class that teaches about common religions and their history.


When I last went to school, the schools I went to where all limited in what they taught. While in theory I have no objection to a school attempting to teach this subject. The theory that because it teaches Christianity it should teach all other religions is foolish, IMHO. No school teaches all theories/subjects in any field that I am aware of. My high school did not teach all subjects in science, nor in math, English, or sports. It seems to me having a school teaching some commonly accepted historical facts could well be beneficial.

For Technical support visit


> Dah's User to User Self Support <

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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 5:16PM #107
DAH54
Posts: 3,318

solfeggio wrote:

OK -
If nobody ever picked up and read a bible or holy book from any religion, ever, and everybody went about their lives never having read a religious book, would that REALLY be such a bad thing?


IMHO yes. Perhaps not for you, perhaps not for your friend, but if no one read any holy books then yes I believe it would be a very bad thing.


solfeggio wrote:

People don't perform good acts because they're thinking of the Ten Commandments.


I believe that is highly debatable, if not simply wrong if the concept here is to express the opinion that people don't do good things because of religious principles. Principles that they learn in part from reading and accepting Holy books.

solfeggio wrote:

We just try to do the right thing because our conscience tells us this. And we are born with a conscience. We don't get it from reading holy books.


We don't agree on what the right thing is, we don't all "know" we don't all believe we "know" what the right thing is. What is acceptable in society is constantly devolving, changing.

solfeggio wrote:

I think that, generally speaking, the countries in the world that are the most secular are the most successful. Keep religion out of the schools - all schools everywhere.


How do you define successful? I'm sure not all will agree with your definition, nor with the countries you claim are most successful. It's all just relative if you take God out of the equation, and no ones opinion is more valuable than anyone else's. That is the exact reason that some are working so hard on taking God out of the equation.



.

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6 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2008 - 8:15PM #108
Phøenix
Posts: 36
Others have probably said this, but I think teaching sacred texts is a great idea as long as they include the Koran, the Book of Mormon, the Vedas, L. Ron Hubbard's "Dianetics", and my personal favorite, the "Egyptian Book of the Dead", more correctly called the Book of Coming Forth By Day. Christianity is not to be given special treatment.
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6 years ago  ::  Jul 30, 2008 - 1:58PM #109
DAH54
Posts: 3,318

Evillynnstar wrote:

First the OT is greatly different than from the Torah.


Evillynnstar, do you understand what you are comparing here? Really understand, have you studied the Jewish religion?

For Technical support visit


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6 years ago  ::  Jul 31, 2008 - 8:18PM #110
DAH54
Posts: 3,318
If you are interested in a Jewish Bible may I suggest ArtScroll's The Stone edition of the Tanach. It is generally accepted as a valid translation, IMHO. I have found it a useful tool in my studies.

The Jewish equivalent of the Old Testament would be the Tanach, and not the Torah as the Torah technically is the five books of Moses: B'resheet, Sh'mot, Vayikra, B'midbar, D'varim (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy). As such there is no possibility that the Torah is the Old Testament as at best is is just a subset of the Old Testament.

It seems to me a fundamental question in any attempted teaching of Christianity is who is/was Jesus. A Christian's answer to this question will be fundamentally different than a Jewish answer to this question. The positions are mutually exclusive. IMHO the biases of the presenter are more likely to be apparent when one presenter must attempt to teach multiple faiths.

Paganism is a very personal religion, and I am curious who one would use as a reference to the teachings of Paganism. Many real Pagan ritual are oath bound to secrecy one must be initiated to gain access to the knowledge. If you want diversity I see Christianity and Paganism as a good combination, but again just what one would teach for Paganism would be very debatable, IMHO.


.
.

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