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Switch to Forum Live View Why store data in Europe?
2 years ago  ::  Jan 28, 2012 - 10:32AM #1
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217
New privacy laws.

The main concern is to do with a clash between amendments to the EU Data Protection Act – which includes the so-called “right to be forgotten” – and the US Patriot Act, which enables authorities to search telephone, email, and financial records without a court order.


news.techworld.com/data-centre/3333104/n...

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 13, 2012 - 1:15PM #2
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

And the Yanks have the arrogance to complain about Aussies storing data in Australia!

Sorry, but under the US Patriot Act, the US government has granted themselves unlimited, and secret access to any and all data stored on a US server.


I've done some contract work for the Canadian Government, and it is illegal to store certain kinds of information on US based servers because it would potentially violate Canadian law. There are companies who have arms-length subsidiaries whose job it is to handle government data that could not be allowed to be stored in the US. This is no different than similar issues [zdnet.com] with US owned companies [eweek.com] accessing EU [pcworld.com] data [forbes.com] because of the Patriot Act.


The US can claim their companies are being hurt by this, but the fact of the matter is, the US is not a trustworthy place to store your data unless you are also going to accept them potentially spying on your citizens.


politics.slashdot.org/story/12/04/13/124...

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2 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2012 - 12:16PM #3
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

Don't store data in the USA!

It's a clear signal to people that if you run a business and your server is in the US, the US can kill your business stone dead in a raid which may have nothing to do with you other than being co-hosted at a server farm. And people wonder why less business is going to the US.


yro.slashdot.org/story/12/04/19/2158205/...

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 05, 2013 - 2:22AM #4
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

American spying causes distrust.

The European Commission also underlined the commercial threat to the US on Thursday by warning that European businesses are likely to abandon the services of American internet providers because of the NSA surveillance scandal. Neelie Kroes, the EC vice-president who speaks on digital affairs, predicted that providers of cloud services, which allow users to store and access data on remote servers, could suffer significant loss of business if clients fear the security of their material is under threat.


www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/04/usa...

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 07, 2013 - 3:20AM #5
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

Ditch Google & Facebook if you're afraid of spying!

German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich on Wednesday said that any Internet users afraid that their private information might be exposed to NSA snooping have a simple way to protect their data: Stop using U.S. services like Google and Facebook. “Whoever fears their communication is being intercepted in any way should use services that don’t go through American servers,” Friedrich said, according to the Associated Press.


bgr.com/2013/07/04/nsa-spying-advice-ger...

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 07, 2013 - 4:03AM #6
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

The following URL has a graphic explaining this subject.

Tor and HTTPS


  • Click the "Tor" button to see what data is visible to eavesdroppers when you're using Tor. The button will turn green to indicate that Tor is on.
  • Click the "HTTPS" button to see what data is visible to eavesdroppers when you're using HTTPS. The button will turn green to indicate that HTTPS is on.
  • When both buttons are green, you see the data that is visible to eavesdroppers when you are using both tools.
  • When both buttons are grey, you see the data that is visible to eavesdroppers when you don't use either tool.
  • Potentially visible data includes: the site you are visiting (SITE.COM), your username and password (USER/PW), the data you are transmitting (DATA), your IP address (LOCATION), and whether or not you are using Tor (TOR).



www.eff.org/pages/tor-and-https

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 11, 2013 - 2:58PM #7
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

Need I say more?


Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal;


The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail;


The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide;


Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to "understand" potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases;


Skype, which was bought by Microsoft in October 2011, worked with intelligence agencies last year to allow Prism to collect video of conversations as well as audio;


Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a "team sport".



m.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/11/micro...

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 17, 2013 - 12:39PM #8
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

Skype give-away.

In a long blog post addressing the latest reports that said Microsoft helped the NSA spy on its users, the company equated Skype with traditional calls, saying that it "[assumes] that all calls, whether over the Internet or by fixed line or mobile phone, will offer similar levels of privacy and security."


For security experts, that means Skype calls are at the mercy of NSA requests, just like traditional phone calls made with landlines or cellphones.


mashable.com/2013/07/16/microsoft-hints-...

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 18, 2013 - 8:39AM #9
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

At the following URL is a gift from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

HTTPS Everywhere is a Firefox and Chrome extension that encrypts your communications with many major websites, making your browsing more secure.


www.eff.org/https-everywhere

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1 year ago  ::  Jul 18, 2013 - 2:30PM #10
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,217

Privacy is no more.

Nothing that is displayed, said or written on the Internet is immune to the electronic panopticon which scans, copies and stores every type of exchange.


www.worldmeets.us/liberation000177.shtml

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