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Switch to Forum Live View Why store data in Europe?
2 years ago  ::  Jun 27, 2014 - 10:53AM #21
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 14,245

Germany won't renew a contract with an American Internet service provider.

"There are indications that Verizon is legally required to provide certain things to the NSA, and that's one of the reasons the cooperation with Verizon won't continue," said Plate.The current contract with Verizon will expire in 2015, he said.


phys.org/news/2014-06-nsa-prompt-germany...


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1 year ago  ::  Jun 09, 2015 - 9:57AM #22
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 14,245

Deep losses, beyond the cloud industry.

Citing significant sales hits taken by big American firms like Apple, Intel, Microsoft, Cisco, Salesforce, Qualcomm, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard, a new report says losses by U.S. tech companies as a result of NSA spying and Snowden's whistleblowing "will likely far exceed" $35 billion.


yro.slashdot.org/story/15/06/09/1235221/...

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10 months ago  ::  Sep 25, 2015 - 4:09AM #23
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 14,245

The United States is unsafe for private information!

A deal easing the transfer of data between the United States and the EU is invalid, an adviser to the European Union's top court said on Wednesday, dealing a blow to a system used by Facebook, Google and thousands of other companies.


The Safe Harbour agreement did not do enough to protect EU citizen's private information when it reached the United States and should have been suspended, Yves Bot, Advocate General at the European Court of Justice (ECJ), said.


www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/23/us-ir...

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9 months ago  ::  Oct 06, 2015 - 9:30AM #24
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 14,245

EU rules on data protection.

Europe's highest court ruled on Tuesday that a widely used international agreement for moving people's digital data between the European Union and the United States was invalid. The decision, by the European Court of Justice, throws into doubt how global technology giants like Facebook and Google can collect, manage and analyze online information from their millions of users in the 28-member bloc. The court decreed that the data-transfer agreement was invalid as of Tuesday's ruling. New submitter nava68 adds links to coverage at the Telegraph; also at TechWeek Europe. From TechWeek Europe's article: The ruling was the court’s final decision in a data-protection case brought by 27-year-old Austrian law student Max Schrems against the Irish data protection commissioner. That case, in turn, was spurred by Schrems’ concerns over the collection of his personal data by Facebook, whose European headquarters is in Ireland, and the possibility that the data was being handed over to US intelligence services.


yro.slashdot.org/story/15/10/06/1217248/...

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9 months ago  ::  Oct 07, 2015 - 6:53AM #25
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 14,245

The victorious activist said thus.

"This judgment draws a clear line," Schrems said in an emailed statement. "It clarifies that mass surveillance violates our fundamental rights. Reasonable legal redress must be possible."


www.canberratimes.com.au/business/world-...

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