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Switch to Forum Live View Why store data in Europe?
10 months ago  ::  Jul 21, 2013 - 9:52PM #11
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678

Internet service provider.

It was also different [from other warrants] because it was for monitoring. They wanted to come in and put in equipment on my network to monitor a single customer. The customer they were monitoring was a particular website that was very benign. It seems ridiculous to me. It was beyond absurd. It wasn’t like a guns and ammo website.


They came in and showed me papers. It was a court order from the FISC (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court) for the intercept, with the agent’s name… and the court’s information. I think it was three or four pages of text. They wouldn’t let met me copy them. They let me take notes in regards to technical aspects of what they wanted to do.


We had to facilitate them to set up a duplicate port to tap in to monitor that customer’s traffic. It was a 2U (two-unit) PC that we ran a mirrored ethernet port to.


www.buzzfeed.com/justinesharrock/what-is...

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10 months ago  ::  Jul 25, 2013 - 10:15AM #12
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678

Master keys.

"The government is definitely demanding SSL keys from providers," said one person who has responded to government attempts to obtain encryption keys.


news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57595202-38/f...

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10 months ago  ::  Jul 28, 2013 - 9:37AM #13
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678

Frankfurter Allgemeine.

The problem with the sick, obsessive superpower revealed to us by Edward Snowden is that it cannot bring itself to utter the one line it absolutely must utter before it can move on: “My name is America and I’m a dataholic.”


www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/debatten/...

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9 months ago  ::  Aug 05, 2013 - 2:23PM #14
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678

Don't outsource records management to an American IT company!

But the Snowden revelations also have implications for you and me.They tell us, for example, that no US-based internet company can be trusted to protect our privacy or data. The fact is that Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Amazon, Apple and Microsoft are all integral components of the US cyber-surveillance system. Nothing, but nothing, that is stored in their "cloud" services can be guaranteed to be safe from surveillance or from illicit downloading by employees of the consultancies employed by the NSA.


www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/jul/...

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9 months ago  ::  Aug 09, 2013 - 4:54AM #15
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678

World quits Yank storage.

But now that those concerns have been validated by the details revealed by Snowden, US cloud providers are losing existing customers from outside the US, according to the CSA study. The survey of members of the organization found that 10 percent of non-US member companies had cancelled contracts with US providers as a result of revelations about PRISM.


The PRISM revelations are also making it harder for US companies to get new business abroad. Of the non-US respondents to the survey, 56 percent are now less likely to consider doing business with a US service provider. And 36 percent of respondents from US companies said that the Snowden “incident” was making it harder for them to do business overseas.


arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/07/pris...

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9 months ago  ::  Aug 10, 2013 - 1:02PM #16
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678

A commentator at the following URL, recommends using a Norwegian Internet provider.

Some countries, especially in Europe, have a constitutional guarantee of secrecy of correspondence, wherein email is equated with letters and therefore protected from all types of screening and surveillance. In electronic communication, this principle protects not only the message contents but also the logs of when and from/to whom messages have been sent.


In Norway, freedom of expression and privacy of correspondence is governed by Article 100 and 102 of the Constitution and the implementation of the European Convention on Human Rights in the Norwegian Human Rights Act, especially Article 8: Right to respect for private and family life.


Additionally, the Personal Data Act as set forth by the Norwegian Data Inspectorate regulates collection, storage, and processing of personal data.


The Data Inspectorate was established January 1, 1980 and was among the first agencies in the world to facilitate the protection of individuals from violation of their right to privacy through processing of their personal data.


ask.slashdot.org/story/13/08/10/168215/a...

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8 months ago  ::  Sep 06, 2013 - 12:25AM #17
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678
A warning.

Ladar Levison, the founder of Lavabit, wrote a public letter to his disappointed customers, offering an ominous warning. “Without Congressional action or a strong judicial precedent,” he wrote, “I would strongly recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States.”


www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/us/nsa-foils-...

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8 months ago  ::  Sep 12, 2013 - 11:28AM #18
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678
Tarnished reputations.

An Information Technology and Innovation Foundation report in August found US providers of cloud services – which manage the networks, storage, applications and computing power for companies – stand to lose as much as $US35 billion ($37.5 billion) a year as foreign companies, spooked by the NSA's surveillance, seek non-US offerings.

"Customers buy products and services based on a company's reputation, and the NSA has single-handedly tarnished the reputation of the entire US tech industry," said Daniel Castro, the report's author and an analyst with the non-partisan research group in Washington. "I suspect many foreign customers are going to be shopping elsewhere for their hardware and software."


www.canberratimes.com.au/it-pro/security...

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7 months ago  ::  Sep 30, 2013 - 11:06AM #19
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678
Bailing out of Yankistan.

But the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation estimates that fallout from revelations about NSA activities could cost Silicon Valley up to $35 billion in annual revenue, much of it from lost overseas business. A survey conducted this summer by the Cloud Security Alliance, an industry group, found that 56% of non-U.S. members said security concerns made it less likely that they would use U.S.-based cloud services. Ten percent said they had canceled a contract.


yro.slashdot.org/story/13/09/30/1146236/...

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6 months ago  ::  Nov 15, 2013 - 2:05PM #20
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,678
I have been reading experts' views on fallout to American business. Basically no purchaser outside the United States should want hardware or software from that country!
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