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3 years ago  ::  Jul 16, 2011 - 10:41AM #1
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
Now you know--or don't!

The National Security Agency does not have to disclose its relationship with Google amid press reports that the two partnered up after hackers in China launched a cyber attack on the U.S. government, a federal judge in Washington ruled. 
     In February 2010, the Electronic Privacy Information Center requested a number of communications between the NSA and Google regarding cyber security. 
     Following an alleged Chinese hacker attack, media outlets had reported that NSA teamed up with the web giant for an investigation. 
     The center, which calls itself a public-interest group dedicated to civil liberties issues, requested records "concerning an agreement or similar basis for collaboration" and "Google's decision to fail to routinely encrypt" Gmail messages and Google Docs.
     The NSA denied the Freedom of Information Act request for the documents.
     "While it acknowledged working 'with a broad range of commercial partners and research associates,' the Agency refused to 'confirm [ or] deny' whether it even had a relationship with Google," the court's order said.
     This type of answer is known as a Glomar response after the Hughes Glomar Explorer, a ship used in a classified CIA project to raise a sunken Soviet submarine from the Pacific Ocean. 


www.courthousenews.com/2011/07/14/38157....

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2 years ago  ::  Jan 26, 2012 - 11:34AM #2
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193

Time to find a non-American social networking site!

"But these tools that mine open source data and presumably store it for a very long time, do away with that kind of privacy. I worry about the effect of that on free speech in the US".


www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/20...

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2 years ago  ::  Jan 26, 2012 - 12:05PM #3
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193

US military malware.

McConnell didn't spell out who exactly the US had attacked with its offensive capabilities. However, RT.com reports that security experts have "all but confirmed" that the US was at least partially behind the Stuxnet worm that damaged Iran's efforts to enrich uranium, working in concert with Israel.


arstechnica.com/business/news/2012/01/us...

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13 months ago  ::  Jul 31, 2013 - 3:56PM #4
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193

How to spook (full details at the following URL).

Training materials for the XKeyscore program detail how analysts can use it and other systems to mine enormous agency databases and develop intelligence from the web


www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/20...

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12 months ago  ::  Sep 01, 2013 - 12:24AM #5
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
This looks malicious!

The implants that [an NSA group called Tailored Access Operations (TAO)] creates are intended to persist through software and equipment upgrades, to copy stored data, 'harvest' communications and tunnel into other connected networks. This year TAO is working on implants that “can identify select voice conversations of interest within a target network and exfiltrate select cuts,” or excerpts, according to one budget document.


yro.slashdot.org/story/13/08/31/2223212/...

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12 months ago  ::  Sep 02, 2013 - 12:28PM #6
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
US telephone surveillance.

Forget the NSA — the DEA has been working hand-in-hand with AT&T on a database of records of every call that passes through AT&T's phone switches going back as far as 1987. The government pays AT&T for contractors who sit side-by-side with DEA agents and do phone records searches for them.


news.slashdot.org/story/13/09/02/1240250...

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11 months ago  ::  Sep 07, 2013 - 4:33AM #7
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
Tor servers need to upgrade software.

'Everyone seems to agree that if anything, the NSA can break 1024 RSA/DH keys,' Graham wrote in a blog post published Friday. 'Assuming no "breakthroughs," the NSA can spend $1 billion on custom chips that can break such a key in a few hours. We know the NSA builds custom chips, they've got fairly public deals with IBM foundries to build chips.'


yro.slashdot.org/story/13/09/07/0028217/...

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11 months ago  ::  Sep 11, 2013 - 12:57PM #8
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
Electronic Frontier Foundation gets documents released.

Incredibly, intelligence officials said today that no one at the NSA fully understood how its own surveillance system worked at the time so they could not adequately explain it to the court. This is a breathtaking admission: the NSA's surveillance apparatus, for years, was so complex and compartmentalized that no single person could comprehend it.


www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/09/government...

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10 months ago  ::  Oct 24, 2013 - 7:38AM #9
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
The job no-one wants!

The cybersecurity industry’s focal point is in DC, and you can guess what that means. Recent recruiting efforts by the federal government to recruit young hackers straight out of high school and at hacker conferences like DefCon have done little to assuage suspicions that cybersecurity means hacking for “The Man.” The summer of Snowden has reinforced the idea that there’s something inherently pernicious in doing so; an informal Motherboard survey at DefCon found that when asked if attendees would work for the NSA, the overwhelming response was "Hell no!"


motherboard.vice.com/blog/the-cybersecur...

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9 months ago  ::  Nov 01, 2013 - 12:32PM #10
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,193
Companies best avoided!

One of the NSA projects described in the resulting articles, PRISM, allegedly siphons information from the databases of nine major technology companies: Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, PalTalk, YouTube, Skype, AOL, and Apple.


slashdot.org/topic/bi/nsa-targeting-goog...

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