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Switch to Forum Live View Various religions and LGBT issues--a definitive list
4 years ago  ::  Feb 14, 2011 - 6:55PM #1
Antiochian
Posts: 72
I've been working on a list of religions, giving them a 1-5 star rating based on their level of affirmation.  The research involved has helped me learn some things, and I plan on sharing it when done.  Wikipedia and other places have such lists, but they aren't exhaustive by any means, meaning they stick to mostly well-known Christian denominations, and maybe throw in Judaism and Buddhism.  I guess I just want the LGBT to know their options when "spirituality shopping."  (For instance, Mormon gays may like to know that the Reorganized LDS church fully supports LGBT equality.)

There are a few religions whose beliefs on the subject I haven't been able to find, and attempts to email via official websites have gone without response.  So... if anyone knows these religions' overall views on sexuality, I'd love the input.   Of course, with many religions the answer could be so varied it's hard, such as with Hinduism and Buddhism, which has a variety of opinions.  Actually, it seems there's a fair amount of homophobia in Buddhist teaching, which surprises me considering the number of gays I know who've been drawn to the religion.  But I digress!

Association of Vineyard Churches   
Full Gospel churches                      
Native American Church                  
Zoroastrianism                                
Gnosticism                                       
Deism                                               
National Spiritualist Association of Churches (Spiritualism)
Swedenborgianism
Asatru
Taoism

Any other lesser-known religious groups you know of, feel free to tell me about them.  I've covered the mainline denom's of Christianity.


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4 years ago  ::  Feb 20, 2011 - 11:06AM #2
REteach
Posts: 14,429

There are often support groups (and support) in distinctly gay-unfriendly churches, such as the RCC and LDS.  I mention this because there are some people who do not want to let homophobes determine their religious options or who want to be role models for closeted gay kids.  

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard was not what I meant...
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4 years ago  ::  Feb 20, 2011 - 2:18PM #3
Yavanna
Posts: 3,149

Reform Judaism has full equality.

The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gloaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.
- J.R.R. Tolkien
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4 years ago  ::  Feb 21, 2011 - 5:19PM #4
BetteTheRedde
Posts: 2,325

If I were asked to rank my denom (the United Church of Canada), I'd give them a 3. They're a 4 (if 1 = worst) from the top down (official stance is positive on equal marriage rights and ordination, also a large Affirming group within the governing body), but a bit patchy at the congregational level, and in a church structured like ours, that's the important place. Individual congregations are welcome to 'build their own' marriage policies. My own congregation marries and welcomes all committed couples, regardless of gender.

"Sometimes they are referred to as the 'radical Right.' But the fact is that there is nothing radical about them. They offer no novel solutions to the problems that plague them; indeed, they offer no solutions at all. They are immensely discontented with things as they are and furiously impatient with almost everyone in public office who can in any way be held responsible for their frustrations. But it cannot be said that they hold any clearly stated objectives or have any specific program either in common or individuals. They are fundamentally and temperamentally 'aginners.' And perhaps the commonest characteristic among them is anger. They can fairly be called, if nothing else, the Rampageous Right."

Alan Barth, New York Times, November 26, 1961
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 23, 2011 - 10:19AM #5
Sirronrex
Posts: 2,675

Feb 20, 2011 -- 11:06AM, REteach wrote:


There are often support groups (and support) in distinctly gay-unfriendly churches, such as the RCC and LDS.  I mention this because there are some people who do not want to let homophobes determine their religious options or who want to be role models for closeted gay kids.  






If these folks truly wanted to be role models for gay kids they would find the courage to leave their pathetic denominations/religions instead of pretending their denominations/religions aren't promoting and condoning evil in the world.

I've been on a journey to nowhere...
and know that's the best place to be...
now...here...




If my faith isn't leading me inward, then my faith is leading me astray.

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3 years ago  ::  Feb 23, 2011 - 12:47PM #6
BetteTheRedde
Posts: 2,325

Problem is, sirronrex, is that leaves the gay kids in the pew (who can't leave yet), with no-one looking out for them.


I've asked the question of a lot of my (few) lesbian and gay friends who remain Christian, "How can you stay after what they've done?". The reply is some variation on "It's MY church, too". I hope and pray that my denom will take a lead in a necessary reconcilation and healing process with our LGBTQ siblings. Right now, we're actively engaged in such a process with our aboriginal neighbours over the residential schools issue, which might be a good model from which to start.

"Sometimes they are referred to as the 'radical Right.' But the fact is that there is nothing radical about them. They offer no novel solutions to the problems that plague them; indeed, they offer no solutions at all. They are immensely discontented with things as they are and furiously impatient with almost everyone in public office who can in any way be held responsible for their frustrations. But it cannot be said that they hold any clearly stated objectives or have any specific program either in common or individuals. They are fundamentally and temperamentally 'aginners.' And perhaps the commonest characteristic among them is anger. They can fairly be called, if nothing else, the Rampageous Right."

Alan Barth, New York Times, November 26, 1961
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 23, 2011 - 12:58PM #7
Sirronrex
Posts: 2,675

Feb 23, 2011 -- 12:47PM, BetteTheRedde wrote:


Problem is, sirronrex, is that leaves the gay kids in the pew (who can't leave yet), with no-one looking out for them.




Those gay kids sitting in the pew are getting the message of hate and prejudice whether or not there is an openly gay person sitting next to them or not.


If I were the gay kid sitting there listening to it and I knew the person next to me was openly gay I would perceive it as more like "I will never be able to leave this hateful, evil place and I am destined to a life of misery and self-loathing seeing as the person sitting next to me can't seem to leave."


Folks can use this bullshit of an excuse all they want. They do little if anything to support those gay kids. Until the church no longer preaches the hate and prejudice these kids will continue to suffer. These gaykids don't hear a message of tolerance just because some openly gay person is sitting next to them in the pew. Trust me, all they hear is the hate and self-loathing being instilled in them.


 


These foks who use this excuse aren't there for the gay kids. They are there for themselves. They simply use the gay kids as an excuse. When they find the courage to leave they will leave. Until then, they will find any and every excuse they can to not have to face the reality that their church is a rotten, evil, wicked place and always has been.

I've been on a journey to nowhere...
and know that's the best place to be...
now...here...




If my faith isn't leading me inward, then my faith is leading me astray.

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