Post Reply
Switch to Forum Live View Houston Elects Openly Gay Mayor - Your Thoughts?
5 years ago  ::  Dec 13, 2009 - 1:05PM #1
Merope
Posts: 10,596

The election of Annise Parker as mayor of Houston is getting a lot of attention from national news outlets noting the significance of the nation's fourth largest city making history by electing an openly gay mayor.  One such story here.


One reason her election is getting attention is because she won the race in a state that outlawed gay marriage and in a city that defeated a referendum granting benefits to same-sex partners of city workers.  The linked article notes the analysis of The Christian Science Monitor: “The distinction neatly sums up the American mood.  As gays and lesbians become broadly accepted in society and politics, that acceptance is marked by a firm boundary beyond which voters do not yet appear willing to cross: same-sex marriage.”


Parker's sexual orientation was apparently a non-issue in the race until the final stretch, when anti-gay activists and conservative religious groups sent out mailers condemning her sexual orientation.


What do you think? 

Merope | Beliefnet Community Manager
Problems? Send a message to Beliefnet_community
Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Dec 14, 2009 - 1:45PM #2
Sirronrex
Posts: 2,675

Dec 13, 2009 -- 1:05PM, Merope wrote:


The election of Annise Parker as mayor of Houston is getting a lot of attention from national news outlets noting the significance of the nation's fourth largest city making history by electing an openly gay mayor.  One such story here.


One reason her election is getting attention is because she won the race in a state that outlawed gay marriage and in a city that defeated a referendum granting benefits to same-sex partners of city workers.  The linked article notes the analysis of The Christian Science Monitor: “The distinction neatly sums up the American mood.  As gays and lesbians become broadly accepted in society and politics, that acceptance is marked by a firm boundary beyond which voters do not yet appear willing to cross: same-sex marriage.”


Parker's sexual orientation was apparently a non-issue in the race until the final stretch, when anti-gay activists and conservative religious groups sent out mailers condemning her sexual orientation.


What do you think? 






 


"anti-gay activists and conservative religious groups"


 


AKA...Christians.

I've been on a journey to nowhere...
and know that's the best place to be...
now...here...




If my faith isn't leading me inward, then my faith is leading me astray.

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Dec 15, 2009 - 1:57PM #3
Total_Top
Posts: 170

Dec 13, 2009 -- 1:05PM, Merope wrote:


The election of Annise Parker as mayor of Houston is getting a lot of attention from national news outlets noting the significance of the nation's fourth largest city making history by electing an openly gay mayor.  One such story here.


One reason her election is getting attention is because she won the race in a state that outlawed gay marriage and in a city that defeated a referendum granting benefits to same-sex partners of city workers.  The linked article notes the analysis of The Christian Science Monitor: “The distinction neatly sums up the American mood.  As gays and lesbians become broadly accepted in society and politics, that acceptance is marked by a firm boundary beyond which voters do not yet appear willing to cross: same-sex marriage.”


Parker's sexual orientation was apparently a non-issue in the race until the final stretch, when anti-gay activists and conservative religious groups sent out mailers condemning her sexual orientation.


What do you think? 




As a Texan, I wouldn’t say that her orientation was a “non-issue” at any point, just that it was more of an undercurrent until closer to election day.


The voter turnout was only 16.5% after both campaigns really pushed a “get out the vote” message.  Still, that’s about what you expect in Texas.


Social conservatives opposed Parker, but they weren’t all that keen on Locke, a black Democrat.  Now, if there had been a nice conservative “white” male running, you might have seen the Caucasian conservatives turn out enough to make a difference.


Probably the good news is that anti-gay rhetoric isn’t as appealing as it used to be when it comes to the work environment.  People appear more willing to work alongside and even under gays and lesbians.


I do not, however, see that translating to an approval for same-sex marriage in the near future.

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Dec 17, 2009 - 9:06AM #4
Sirronrex
Posts: 2,675

Dec 15, 2009 -- 1:57PM, Total_Top wrote:

Probably the good news is that anti-gay rhetoric isn’t as appealing as it used to be when it comes to the work environment.  People appear more willing to work alongside and even under gays and lesbians.


I do not, however, see that translating to an approval for same-sex marriage in the near future.



 


The legal recognition of marriage has nothing to do with "approval" of marriage. They are completely separate and distinct. The state's recognition of a couple's union is not a "stamp of approval", it is merely recognition that two people have formed a legal bond.


I believe anti-gay rhetoric isn't as appealing in the workplace because gay people are open and honest with their co-workers about who they are and who they share their lives with. Having a jewish person sitting next to you at work makes it a little more difficult to share your anti-semitic views. Same goes if there's an African American sitting next to you and sharing racist views. The anti-semites and racists and misogynists are sitting amongst us at work...we just don't know who they are because their views have been deemed inappropriate for the workplace and in most cases have been "outlawed" in the workplace by both corporate and public policy. Living openly and honestly will eventually lead to the legal recognition of marriage for gay couples. Approval of those marriages may never happen, but that's not an issue for the gay community to address or fight for. That's a reflection of those who disapprove and has absolutely nothing to do with gay people and everything to do with the sick and perverted religion that has advocated, lobbied, supported, taught, instilled, and demanded disapproval not just of same-sex marriage but of actually being gay. That issue will eventually need to be addressed by those within that warped religion and a similar ostracizing of those views will need to occur within that religion. But I won't hold my breath. The Christian religion still has a plethora of advocates and mainline denominations who still support anti-semitic views and misogynistic views. I doubt gay people will be allowed to go to the front of the very long line of people deemed "unworthy" by the vast majority of Christians...so it isn't worth the effort to try and change those who see change as "evil".

I've been on a journey to nowhere...
and know that's the best place to be...
now...here...




If my faith isn't leading me inward, then my faith is leading me astray.

Quick Reply
Cancel
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook