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Switch to Forum Live View Pregnancy Prevention Pills offer in Middle school?
6 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 3:57PM #1
qtbabe
Posts: 823
Hello all,

On the CNN news this morning, school board in Portland, Main offer pregnancy prevention pills to girls at 11-13 years old.  These are middle school student. What do you think of this?  This news shock the heck out of me.  Kids grow up so fast nowadays...
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 7:41PM #2
DustyLady
Posts: 430
I would have to be concerned about what such pills can do to young and growing bodies.

Dusty
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 7:51PM #3
Laura78
Posts: 2,774
If the girls are having sex, then I am glad they are getting the pill. Pregnancy can be pretty devastating too at that age.
But what about STD? Condoms should be available as well. And Sex Ed. And parents involvement. And...
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 8:32PM #4
Bbabs
Posts: 32
Have you ever BEEN to Portland, Maine....not much to do there.....

All kidding aside....

That should not be the schools responsability....that is the third time today that I have heard and seen that article but haven't had the chance yet to read the details....are they giving them out to all students...to the low income families...yes and what else along with that also like said above. What message is that giving the boys in the school ?
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 6:10AM #5
jaxx
Posts: 45
There are GOOD socio-political reasons to reduce the number of accidental pregnancies: This is even more important in the younger females.

The current female-pill has some serious drawbacks and it's use in middle school girls is worrying.

The most reasonable response, from a political point of view would be to put time-money into the male protein antagonist pill. Unfortunately, most people object to 'wasting' money on males. The one time the PA was tested in first stage human testing there was only one side effect, a small number of the 65 men tested (in Brazil) had complete death of the nurse cells, causing permanent sterility (3? 4?). There should be a way around this, but there's almost no money! The money goes to women. (The male Norplant & injection, (using the current Norplant for women), currently in stage two human testing, has so many serious side effects that they cannot keep men in the test program and is being shut down.)

Thus, we're stuck with the less than reasonable solutions which are possible and that may well mean giving the current less-than-safe female pill to young girls.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 8:45AM #6
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849
I read the article and it looks like parental permission must be obtained before birth control services will be administered. However, which services are used by an individual child will not be revealed to the parent.

Not sure how I feel about this.  On the one hand, folks seem fond of saying that kids will have sex with or without protection, so might as well give them some means of preventing pregnancy.  On the other hand, others say that this sort of thing only encourages kids to have sex in the first place.   I don't know which argument holds more validity. Perhaps both have some measure of reality to them.  There is quite a discussion about this over on MSN.

I wonder how thorough an exam the physician gives the child prior to administering BC pills.  Is a complete medical history obtained such that things like blood clot problems are made known so the physician can make an informed decision regarding appropriateness of BC pills? Would an 11 year old be able to correctly give such a history?

There’s a poster called Sparkki (I think I have her handle correct) that made some good points regarding children having sex (I won’t be able to do her words justice- but I’ll do my best).  The idea is that if kids want to do adult activities, like having sex, then they should also assume all adult activities, such as holding a job, having their own place and looking after themselves.  I assume this would be something talked about early on, so if the child decided to have sex at age 13, then he/she would understand that would also entail moving into their own digs and earning their own way.   Hopefully they'd realize this is mighty hard for a young teen to accomplish on their own. But that is what an adult is expected to do- fend for him/herself.

I realize thrusting adult responsibilities on a 13 year old is not appropriate, but how else can one impart the importance of waiting on sex until one is mature enough to handle all of the aspects (possible parenthood, emotional issues, etc)?

Upon reflecting on this, would a 13 year old decide to have sex anyway and hope real hard that the parents don’t find out?  Wouldn't be the first time a  13 year old figured he/she could outsmart the parents. I’m betting a lot of young teens feel peer pressure to the degree that they are willing to defy the parents just to keep from being rejected by peers-this includes risky behavior and possible parenthood.

Irene.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 12:22PM #7
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849
DAH: I do agree with your stand- this whole idea could very well give kids the notion that it’s okay to hide such activity from their parents.  Why can’t child go to parent for birth control matters?  If teen desires to participate in adult activities (sex) then they ought to be able to discuss this with their parents in a grown-up fashion (and I’m talking boys as well as girls).  Feeling embarrassed about talking about sex with the parents is not a valid excuse. After all, responsible adults within a relationship do talk to each other about sex/birth control as they are the one’s who will deal with consequences of such activity. In a teen’s case, the parents would be impacted by the child’s engaging in sex, so it stands to reason they be included in such discussion.  Hiding the fact that they are engaging in sexual activity only proves they are not grown-up enough to be engaging in it.


Also, if this service is needed in this district, certainly this should serve as a wake-up call to parents to examine how well a job they are doing regarding sex education - including moral teachings and the like- rather then have a school district impart moral values to one’s kids. Though I wonder, how many parents have dispensed with their responsibility to properly instruct their kids in this respect? Is this the case in this school district?

Irene.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 3:37PM #8
gpfm11
Posts: 174
Like it or not, children DO have the right to not talk to their parents. Children also have the right to not respect their parents.

For a lot of children, it isn't about feeling embarrassed, it is a question of self protection. 11 year old children who are having sex, are not being well cared for and loved at home.

If an 11 year old child was to actually get pregnant, it would ruin a lot of lives. I would rather that they have protection to avoid this. They are going to have enough other issues to deal with, much less trying to raise a baby at the same time.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 3:57PM #9
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849
[QUOTE=gpfm11;8757]Like it or not, children DO have the right to not talk to their parents. Children also have the right to not respect their parents.

Yes, but at ages 11-13, unless the child is emancipated, the parents are responsible for their child and his/her actions.  This includes financial responsibility as well. And a baby ain't cheap.
Perhaps the noncommunication betw. parents and child is a signal that all is not right within the family- outside counseling or other assistance might improve things. 



For a lot of children, it isn't about feeling embarrassed, it is a question of self protection. 11 year old children who are having sex, are not being well cared for and loved at home.

So sexual intercourse or birth control of some kind is the solution to a child's lousy home life? Perhaps the CPS people should be contacted if a child requests birth control so that unfit living situations can be changed?




If an 11 year old child was to actually get pregnant, it would ruin a lot of lives. I would rather that they have protection to avoid this. They are going to have enough other issues to deal with, much less trying to raise a baby at the same time.[/QUOTE]

Yes, avoiding an unwanted baby is a good thing for all concerned.  And for many, the reality of having BC options readily available will prevent a lot of future problems- you are right.  I just think there's something very wrong with child having to sneak around parents trying to embarking on adult activities when they are not mature enough to handle adult responsibilities. One doesn't hand over the car keys to a 4 year old. 




Irene.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 19, 2007 - 4:06PM #10
gpfm11
Posts: 174
So sexual intercourse or birth control of some kind is the solution to a child's lousy home life?
If I child is not loved and respected at home, he/ she will seek that attention somewhere else.

Perhaps the CPS people should be contacted if a child requests birth control so that unfit living situations can be changed?

At minimum, someone needs to be finding out what is going on. If it is the school's guidance councilor, or the nurse or CPS, it doesn't matter. I realize that this isn't all children who are having sex at 11, but I am young enough to remember that there were lots of bad parents, raising troubled kids.

I just think there's something very wrong with child having to sneak around parents trying to embarking on adult activities when they are not mature enough to handle adult responsibilities.

I agree. I truly wish the behavior was not an issue at all, but since it is, I think we need to minimize the damage.
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