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Switch to Forum Live View "Midas Touch" My Plate
3 years ago  ::  Aug 04, 2011 - 8:39PM #1
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
Many Americans can't afford all the fresh fruits and veggies they'd have to buy to meet the Choose My Plate guidelines.

www.longislandpress.com/2011/08/04/study...

Looks like My Plate is gold-plated.
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 04, 2011 - 10:43PM #2
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Aug 4, 2011 -- 8:39PM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Many Americans can't afford all the fresh fruits and veggies they'd have to buy to meet the Choose My Plate guidelines. www.longislandpress.com/2011/08/04/study... Looks like My Plate is gold-plated.



A bit of an exaggeration, I think. :


that an alarmingly large portions of Americans can not afford salmon, greens and rice that the government suggests.


One need not buy salmon. Rice in the bag is CHEAP. Fresh fruit and veggies in season are a bit pricier, so don't buy the chips and ho-ho's.


Seems this survey might have been conducted in inner city areas of D.C where access is limited as are inccomes. This need should be addressed separately, not by changing the My Plate picture.


Something else also needs addressing : overworked parents who are too tired to shop and cook.


I can't buy the premise.................


 


 



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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 9:39AM #3
Christianlib
Posts: 21,848

Yes, jane, "rice in the bag" is cheap.  But to just take that example, rice takes time to prepare, and time is a commodity the working poor are often very short on.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 9:40AM #4
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,178

Aug 4, 2011 -- 10:43PM, jane2 wrote:


Aug 4, 2011 -- 8:39PM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Many Americans can't afford all the fresh fruits and veggies they'd have to buy to meet the Choose My Plate guidelines. www.longislandpress.com/2011/08/04/study... Looks like My Plate is gold-plated.



A bit of an exaggeration, I think. :


that an alarmingly large portions of Americans can not afford salmon, greens and rice that the government suggests.


One need not buy salmon. Rice in the bag is CHEAP. Fresh fruit and veggies in season are a bit pricier, so don't buy the chips and ho-ho's.


Seems this survey might have been conducted in inner city areas of D.C where access is limited as are inccomes. This need should be addressed separately, not by changing the My Plate picture.


Something else also needs addressing : overworked parents who are too tired to shop and cook.


I can't buy the premise.................


 


 







Like Jane, I'm not sure I agree. Rice is super cheap especially when you buy the big bag. If one shops at Aldi or a walmart then one can get fruits and veggies for cheap. I would think it has more to do with time and the lack of knowledge when it comes to how to cook certain things.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 9:45AM #5
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
Jane, I disagree that buying fresh veggies and fruits is as affordable as you say it is.  

I spent $62 on groceries yesterday. About one-third of that was fresh meats, and the bulk of the remainder went for fresh fruit and veggies. 

Let's say $35 of produce which will last us about 2-3 days since much of it will be combined with other items already on hand. And it will last the two of us that long because my husband eats about half as much fruit and veggies as I do. 

Now, if we were a family of four trying to do My Plate, I'd bet that $35 of produce would last for maybe two, possibly three meals depending upon the ages of my hypothetical kids.  And I bought all seasonal, locally grown produce which is fairly inexpensive currently. 

Granted, I could have gotten canned fruit and vegetables. However, the promos for My Plate illustrate fresh greens and fruits, and the least expensive canned veggies are loaded with sodium and questionably as healthy as fresh or frozen veggies anyway. 

As for your remark that rice is cheap, it's a grain, not a vegetable. Grains comprise only about 1/4 of My Plate. And white rice may be filling, but if that's a family's staple, it would get boring very soon unless they're well-versed in Asian meal planning and cooking. 

I think the My Plate concept is likely to educate and to be adopted largely by those not needing to budget carefully to buy sufficient food.   
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 9:54AM #6
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,178

Aug 5, 2011 -- 9:45AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Jane, I disagree that buying fresh veggies and fruits is as affordable as you say it is.   I spent $62 on groceries yesterday. About one-third of that was fresh meats, and the bulk of the remainder went for fresh fruit and veggies.  Let's say $35 of produce which will last us about 2-3 days since much of it will be combined with other items already on hand. And it will last the two of us that long because my husband eats about half as much fruit and veggies as I do.  Now, if we were a family of four trying to do My Plate, I'd bet that $35 of produce would last for maybe two, possibly three meals depending upon the ages of my hypothetical kids.  And I bought all seasonal, locally grown produce which is fairly inexpensive currently.  Granted, I could have gotten canned fruit and vegetables. However, the promos for My Plate illustrate fresh greens and fruits, and the least expensive canned veggies are loaded with sodium and questionably as healthy as fresh or frozen veggies anyway.  As for your remark that rice is cheap, it's a grain, not a vegetable. Grains comprise only about 1/4 of My Plate. And white rice may be filling, but if that's a family's staple, it would get boring very soon unless they're well-versed in Asian meal planning and cooking.  I think the My Plate concept is likely to educate and to be adopted largely by those not needing to budget carefully to buy sufficient food.   




Where did you shop? I don't spend that much on fruits and veggies for just me, but I shop at Kroger for that stuff. When I was poor, I bought that stuff at Aldi or other discount grocery stores.

"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 10:14AM #7
farragut
Posts: 4,000

It seems to me that the fresh veggies and lovely balance of MY Plate simply are not available to the underprivileged, at least in my city. For one thing, there are no nice supermarkets in the west side or the Newburg area where the underprivileged seem to be concentrated. Their only food stores are the little quickmart sorts of places where variety is slim and prices are high. One would think that our entrpreneurial local farmers would set up their occasional farmer's markets in such areas, but it doesn't happen. And even if they did, it would be of little value, for these clever folks price their produce right up there to compete with the fancy-schmancy specialty shops. And of course the fancy-schmancy suburbanites love to pay those prices; for they know that this is all light-years ahead of what Kroger offers. So the farmers markets stay in the suburbs.


The food stamp  regime does not help either. I have seen the list of what they can get, and it tended heavily toward inexpensive, high-calory foods, milk, cheese, peanut butter, and bread.


I doesn't has a good answer.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 10:19AM #8
Abner1
Posts: 6,391

Christianlib wrote:


> Yes, jane, "rice in the bag" is cheap.  But to just take that example, rice takes time to


> prepare, and time is a commodity the working poor are often very short on.


Furthermore, rice just isn't a fresh fruit or vegetable.


Most fresh fruits and veggies cost around $1.50/Lb here, though you can get slightly better prices through careful shopping (down around $1.25/Lb if you let the sales determine your diet).  Most meats cost more, but cheap meats like chicken or fatty ground beef run around the same cost as the fresh fruits and veggies ... and are a lot more calorie-efficient (you can get a lot more calories for the same cost).  Candy, cookies etc. are even cheaper for the same number of calories.


A lot of people forget that low-calorie is only perceived as a good thing in a food if you're not on the edge of starving and looking to scavenge every calorie you can.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 10:31AM #9
costrel
Posts: 6,226

Aug 5, 2011 -- 9:45AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

As for your remark that rice is cheap, it's a grain, not a vegetable. Grains comprise only about 1/4 of My Plate. And white rice may be filling, but if that's a family's staple, it would get boring very soon unless they're well-versed in Asian meal planning and cooking.   I think the My Plate concept is likely to educate and to be adopted largely by those not needing to budget carefully to buy sufficient food.   


Rice is no more "boring" than bread. And for those who get tired of its taste, there are lots of easy ways to make it more interesting. One easy way is to add a little ground nutmeg, curry powder, or even cinnamon to it to spice up the taste. Another easy way is to use it as one does in Japan (and probably in other parts of Asia as well) -- that is, much as bread and potatoes are used as a food wrapping. Here in the U.S., we wrap our hot dogs and burgers in bread (in the form of buns), we cover biscuits with chicken or sausage gravy, we cover slices of bread with beef stew, we use flat bread as pizza crust, we cover potatoes with beef gravy or saurkraut, etc. Rice is used in much the same way (again, at least in Japan). And even if one eats just a plain bento of rice, one usually eats a nice tart umeboshi (pickled plum) or some tsukemono (pickled vegetables) along with it. Here in the U.S., we could probably replace the umeboshi and tsukemono with an old-fashioned dill pickle! 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 05, 2011 - 10:41AM #10
costrel
Posts: 6,226

Right now at Wal-Mart, I can but local corn on the cob for 25 cents an ear (of course, I have to drive 40 miles to get to Wal-Mart). Buying four ears of corn is cheaper than buying a bottle of pop (or soda or soda-pop, whatever one wants to call it). Out my way, if I were to go vegetarian or vegan, my grocery bills would be much cheaper than they currently are with my meat-based diet. Meat, eggs, and milk are terribly expensive, but I choose to consume them anyway. 



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