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Switch to Forum Live View It ain't for the taste
3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 1:22PM #1
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849

A Consumer Reports survey reports that the larger fast food joints are not patronized for the taste of their products but rather for their low prices:


www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43589990/ns/busines...


Hmmm. I guess it isn't all about flavor but about the wallet too.
Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well.
Irene.     

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 1:33PM #2
Erey
Posts: 18,738

I will say low prices yes, but also convenience.  Convenience is big in my household with two athletic and active children needing to be here and there. 


In fact there are a couple of places near my house that offer a good drive thru menu.


One place will offer a burger and fries but also a grilled mahi-mahi  fish taco or a spinach salad.  The other is a mexican/cuban place that offers good grilled food with lots of veggies.


These places are more expensive but they offer a more ballanced meal.  Now my challenge is to get my athelete son to agree to go for the salad vs. the burger and fries.  That boy eats probably 5 thousand calories a day and burns them all off. 

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 2:42PM #3
Merope
Posts: 9,862

Jun 30, 2011 -- 1:22PM, IreneAdler wrote:


A Consumer Reports survey reports that the larger fast food joints are not patronized for the taste of their products but rather for their low prices:


www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43589990/ns/busines...


Hmmm. I guess it isn't all about flavor but about the wallet too.
Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well.
Irene.    



I believe it :-)  I've been noticing for years that many McDonald's franchises in my (major US) city are largely patronized by homeless people because McDonald's provides cheap protein (burgers, chicken, etc.), carbs, and something to drink - including cheap coffee. 


They're also patronized during lunch hours throughout the work week by folks trying to save a buck on lunch. 


It's not all that healthy, and not all that tasty, but it's a balanced meal at an affordable price for many people - especially street people who have no home, no money, and thus no means to buy healthy food to bring home to cook.

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 3:09PM #4
Abner1
Posts: 6,391

IreneAdler wrote:


> Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well. 


A major part of the problem is that we subsidize certain food industries heavily - and not the ones that we should be subsidizing.  If we are going to distort the food economy, it would be far better to support the consumption of fruits and vegetables with subsidies.  The industries that produce meats, fast foods, processed foods, etc. are obviously capable of supporting themselves and don't really need our help.

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 3:28PM #5
MMarcoe
Posts: 16,493

Jun 30, 2011 -- 1:22PM, IreneAdler wrote:


A Consumer Reports survey reports that the larger fast food joints are not patronized for the taste of their products but rather for their low prices:


www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43589990/ns/busines...


Hmmm. I guess it isn't all about flavor but about the wallet too.
Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well.
Irene.  





If this logic is true, then if McDonald's converted to a menu of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and beans (with none of the junk added) while maintaining the same low prices, then it will stay in business.


But that wouldn't happen. I think taste is part of the appeal. I think it has an addicting nature that people aren't even aware of. In fact, despite being a 20-year vegetarian, my mouth is watering right now for burgers that I ate 30 years ago.


 

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 3:32PM #6
MMarcoe
Posts: 16,493

Jun 30, 2011 -- 3:09PM, Abner1 wrote:


IreneAdler wrote:


> Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well. 


A major part of the problem is that we subsidize certain food industries heavily - and not the ones that we should be subsidizing.  If we are going to distort the food economy, it would be far better to support the consumption of fruits and vegetables with subsidies.  The industries that produce meats, fast foods, processed foods, etc. are obviously capable of supporting themselves and don't really need our help.





I don't know. Without subsidies, corn farmers can't even stay in business. What would happen to the food processors if corn farmers lost their subsidies? Corn is in everything these days. The alternatives may not be cheap enough for them to use.


Wait -- that's a great idea. Make them so expensive that food processors go out of business. And give tax credits to vegetable gardeners! I'd qualify for two of them!


 


 

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 3:37PM #7
Erey
Posts: 18,738

Jun 30, 2011 -- 3:32PM, MMarcoe wrote:


Jun 30, 2011 -- 3:09PM, Abner1 wrote:


IreneAdler wrote:


> Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well. 


A major part of the problem is that we subsidize certain food industries heavily - and not the ones that we should be subsidizing.  If we are going to distort the food economy, it would be far better to support the consumption of fruits and vegetables with subsidies.  The industries that produce meats, fast foods, processed foods, etc. are obviously capable of supporting themselves and don't really need our help.





I don't know. Without subsidies, corn farmers can't even stay in business. What would happen to the food processors if corn farmers lost their subsidies? Corn is in everything these days. The alternatives may not be cheap enough for them to use.


Wait -- that's a great idea. Make them so expensive that food processors go out of business. And give tax credits to vegetable gardeners! I'd qualify for two of them!


 


 




Well maybe.  I think we do need to think about subsidizing some of the foods that are more easily spoiled, like fruits and veggies.  to make them cheaper. 


The great thing about our society is that it is not uncommon to see a obese homeless person.  Truly this is an improvement over the starving homeless people.  The reason we have this is because we have plentiful cheap food.  So if that were taken away we would have to worry more about people starving. 

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 3:39PM #8
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Jun 30, 2011 -- 2:42PM, Merope wrote:


Jun 30, 2011 -- 1:22PM, IreneAdler wrote:


A Consumer Reports survey reports that the larger fast food joints are not patronized for the taste of their products but rather for their low prices:


www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43589990/ns/busines...


Hmmm. I guess it isn't all about flavor but about the wallet too.
Bit disconcerting though.  I wish the cheapest food was the healthiest as well.
Irene.    



I believe it :-)  I've been noticing for years that many McDonald's fanchises in my (major US) city are largely patronized by homeless people because McDonald's provides cheap protein (burgers, chicken, etc.), carbs, and something to drink - including cheap coffee. 


They're also patronized during lunch hours throughout the work week by folks trying to save a buck on lunch. 


It's not all that healthy, and not all that tasty, but it's a balanced meal at an affordable price for many people - especially street people who have no home, no money, and thus no means to buy healthy food to bring home to cook.




More than a little truth in your post.


Your city has some of the freshest fish and vegetables I've found.


We did a little day tour down the coast and stopped at the Dream Inn where the server taught me how to eat a cooked and chilled artichoke with a spicy mayo dip.


 

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 4:24PM #9
costrel
Posts: 6,226

Jun 30, 2011 -- 1:33PM, Erey wrote:

I will say low prices yes, but also convenience.  Convenience is big in my household with two athletic and active children needing to be here and there. 


I agree that convenience is also an important factor. I may live nearly 40 miles away from the nearest fast-food restaurant, but the way they are positioned in large towns right along the Interstate makes me more inclined to stop and eat at them when I'm on the road. Plus (and I know this is going to make me sound really selfish) I don't have to worry about tipping at a fast-food restaurant like I have to do at a sit-down restaurant with servers.

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2011 - 4:41PM #10
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,250

Jun 30, 2011 -- 4:24PM, costrel wrote:


Jun 30, 2011 -- 1:33PM, Erey wrote:

I will say low prices yes, but also convenience.  Convenience is big in my household with two athletic and active children needing to be here and there. 


I agree that convenience is also an important factor. I may live nearly 40 miles away from the nearest fast-food restaurant, but the way they are positioned in large towns right along the Interstate makes me more inclined to stop and eat at them when I'm on the road. Plus (and I know this is going to make me sound really selfish) I don't have to worry about tipping at a fast-food restaurant like I have to do at a sit-down restaurant with servers.





That's not selfish, Costrel. The tip adds to the cost of a meal.

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