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Flag solfeggio April 3, 2011 12:23 AM EDT
Drinking coffee with fatty fast food will raise blood sugar levels because caffeine interferes with the body's mechanism for clearing sugars from the blood. 

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/11...

jn.nutrition.org/content/141/4/574.abstr...

www.redorbit.com/news/health/2023076/cof...

Bottom line here is that, if you're worried about your blood sugar levels, it is better to have caffeine-free drinks with your fast food.
Flag jane2 April 3, 2011 12:38 AM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 12:23AM, solfeggio wrote:

Drinking coffee with fatty fast food will raise blood sugar levels because caffeine interferes with the body's mechanism for clearing sugars from the blood. 

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/11...

jn.nutrition.org/content/141/4/574.abstr...

www.redorbit.com/news/health/2023076/cof...

Bottom line here is that, if you're worried about your blood sugar levels, it is better to have caffeine-free drinks with your fast food.



Okay. What's the point, though??? Another dietary guide ???????????? I am beginning to wonder how many guides this small audience needs.


Sorry, solf, but it gets old. (I'm much more interested in what is happening with world at large without too much feminine emotionalism.) My education was almost entirely based on intellectual rationalism, with a bit of wit for the fun of it and I was educated by the very learned women who were Carondelet Sisters of St. Joseph.




Flag Ebon April 3, 2011 1:05 AM EDT

I've never seen the attraction of coffee with fast food anyway. I mean, I love my coffee and drink collosal amounts of it but drinking hot drinks with fast food has always struck me as weird. I'd much rather have a Coke or Sprite.

Flag DotNotInOz April 3, 2011 6:45 AM EDT

No biggie to me since being gluten-intolerant, I can't eat anything but salad at fast food places anyway unless I'm craving a Mickey D's Quarter-Pounder with cheese enough to endure feeling rotten for about three days. I've gotten smarter, and that doesn't happen but extremely rarely anymore.


The only fast food I ever drank coffee with was breakfast anyway. Just not that much of a coffee drinker.


Geez, Ebon, soda will kill you as effectively as coffee. Listen to Solfeggio. Eat and drink healthier, man. < sassy wink and grin as she ducks and runs for cover >

Flag IreneAdler April 3, 2011 7:33 AM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 6:45AM, DotNotInOz wrote:


No biggie to me since being gluten-intolerant, I can't eat anything but salad at fast food places anyway unless I'm craving a Mickey D's Quarter-Pounder with cheese enough to endure feeling rotten for about three days. I've gotten smarter, and that doesn't happen but extremely rarely anymore.


The only fast food I ever drank coffee with was breakfast anyway. Just not that much of a coffee drinker.


Geez, Ebon, soda will kill you as effectively as coffee. Listen to Solfeggio. Eat and drink healthier, man. < sassy wink and grin as she ducks and runs for cover >





I hear ya!


It very much amazed me how pervasive wheat products are in fast foods. This is independent of the obvious like buns.  Take french fries.  These have wheat additives- I presume for flavor enhancement.  But I did learn that In'N'Out doesn't add wheat additives to their foods.  And one can order a bunless burger. Haven't done this yet, but I know if I get a hankering I can go somewhere. But the idea of a bunless burger just ain't the same, in my opinion.


 And I won't be ordering coffee with my burger as I don't drink it.  So I'm safe.


Irene.

Flag DotNotInOz April 3, 2011 7:46 AM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 7:33AM, IreneAdler wrote:

It very much amazed me how pervasive wheat products are in fast foods. This is independent of the obvious like buns.  Take french fries.  These have wheat additives- I presume for flavor enhancement. 



Not just fast food. A celiac or gluten-intolerant really can't eat much of any processed foodstuffs as you likely are aware, Irene. Wheat flour is used as a thickener in sauces, as a coating for various reasons, and any food which has a label saying "spices" may contain wheat flour, too. It's added in superfine form to lots of seasonings to help keep them freeflowing.


The wheat additive to frozen french fries is to keep them from sticking together when frozen. The same is true of packaged shredded cheese. That's why it doesn't become a gloppy mass in the package, unlike moist cheeses you shred and try to store for later use. 


Even things like candies are often coated with it to prevent sticking.

Flag costrel April 3, 2011 9:28 AM EDT

If I'm eating at a fast food restaurant, I don't plan on eating healthy anyway, so why not just have a coffee with that burger and those fries? I once would order the milk with my fast food, but I no longer do that, and go for the big guzzler of pop instead. (I never drink coffee, not even at home.)


As for wheat -- I once knew a science teacher who did not believe that humans should eat grains. His reasoning was that since grains are recent foods from our recent agricultural past (as opposed to our much longer hunting and gathering past), that the human stomach is not evolutionarily adapted to them. It seems that the most-ideal human diet based on our evolutionary adaptations would be meat (including fish and eggs), nuts, fruits, and vegetables.

Flag DotNotInOz April 3, 2011 11:41 AM EDT

Yes, well, it is true that some vegetarians and certainly vegans insist that cow's milk is something that no human should ever consume. So, I don't know that your choice of milk with your fast food, Costrel, was significantly better than coffee or a soda. At least moderately, I'd say.


You do make an excellent point, however, that any sensible person choosing to eat fast food realizes that they're hardly eating healthfully unless they order something like a salad without dressing and unsweetened tea or water to drink. As an occasional indulgence, even a burger and fries with a caffeinated regular soda probably causes no harm.

Flag costrel April 3, 2011 2:43 PM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 11:41AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Yes, well, it is true that some vegetarians and certainly vegans insist that cow's milk is something that no human should ever consume. So, I don't know that your choice of milk with your fast food, Costrel, was significantly better than coffee or a soda. At least moderately, I'd say.


After spending some time about 5 years ago on Beliefnet's now nearly-dead Animal Rights Debate Board, I am well-versed in the so-called "evils" of cow's milk. I am reminded of what Thoreau wrote in his journals when he was thirty-three: "It [water] is the only drink of a wise man, and only the foolish habitually use any other." Tea, coffee, milk, soda-pop, beer, wine, fruit juices -- all of these beverages are considered unhealthy by someone or other, and many people, religious and secular, abstain from one or many of these. I, though, will continue to drink my habitual water along with my habitual milk and every now and then a cup of tea or a can of pop (and once or twice a year a glass of wine for dinner during the holidays). I see no reason to abstain from every drink besides water (though I dislike the taste of coffee and beer, so I have no reason to drink any of that stuff).


You do make an excellent point, however, that any sensible person choosing to eat fast food realizes that they're hardly eating healthfully unless they order something like a salad without dressing and unsweetened tea or water to drink. As an occasional indulgence, even a burger and fries with a caffeinated regular soda probably causes no harm.


If I really wanted to eat a salad while I was on the road, I'd go to a truck stop and buy one of those gigantic salads for two and a half dollars and make it last for at least two meals. That is a much better deal than buying a little salad and a little cup of fuit and yogurt (I know -- more dairy!) at a fast food restaurant such as McDonalds.

Flag DotNotInOz April 3, 2011 3:54 PM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 2:43PM, costrel wrote:

After spending some time about 5 years ago on Beliefnet's now nearly-dead Animal Rights Debate Board, I am well-versed in the so-called "evils" of cow's milk. I am reminded of what Thoreau wrote in his journals when he was thirty-three: "It [water] is the only drink of a wise man, and only the foolish habitually use any other." Tea, coffee, milk, soda-pop, beer, wine, fruit juices -- all of these beverages are considered unhealthy by someone or other, and many people, religious and secular, abstain from one or many of these.



And you probably also know that Thoreau was something of a crank about various things.


Anyway, assuming that he adhered scrupulously to his own advice, doing so could well have contributed to his dying of tuberculosis, susceptibility to which we know today was brought about by the malnutrition of many 19th century folk.


Knowing as I do that while living his presumed hermit's existence at Walden Pond he walked the railroad tracks daily to lunch at his mother's house in Concord, I have my doubts that he was so virtuous as to drink only water consistently. If he didn't, such is the human condition, of course.


As for what's considered unhealthy by someone, you're quite correct that all of the above have been cited at one time or another. Even water can be consumed to suicidal excess if one overhydrates to the point of cardiac arrest.


Life itself is terminal.

Flag costrel April 3, 2011 5:14 PM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 3:54PM, DotNotInOz wrote:

And you probably also know that Thoreau was something of a crank about various things.


Anyway, assuming that he adhered scrupulously to his own advice, doing so could well have contributed to his dying of tuberculosis, susceptibility to which we know today was brought about by the malnutrition of many 19th century folk.


Knowing as I do that while living his presumed hermit's existence at Walden Pond he walked the railroad tracks daily to lunch at his mother's house in Concord, I have my doubts that he was so virtuous as to drink only water consistently. If he didn't, such is the human condition, of course.


Accorinding to Emerson's eulogy of Thoreau, "he ate no flesh, he drank no wine, [and] he never knew the use of tobacco." The first one is certainly false (Thoreau claimed in Walden to have eaten, in addition to fish, a fried rat and a woodchuck), though he did write in the chapter "Higher Laws" from Walden that "[w]hatever my own practice may be, I have no doubt that it is a part of the destiny of the human race, in its gradual improvement, to leave off eating animals," so he at least identified vegetarianism as either something that he should practice or something that would be practiced among later generations of Americans. Literary critic Harold Bloom also praises Thoreau for his temperance, noting, "Whether Thoreau's temperance is to be credited to the restraints of stoical philosophy or to plain good taste, it is a virtue to be thankful for" (Henry David Thoreau [New York: Infobase, 2008], page 56).


I think that sometimes, possibly because of the way that Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. (as well as Thoreau's friends Emerson and Harrison Blake) esteemed and lauded Thoreau, people have a tendency to see him as some hagiographical and thus idealistically-fictitious saint rather than an historical man who struggled with identifying and practicing his philosophical and moral ideas (and perhaps even, like Whitman, relishing in his contradictions).

Flag writingal1 April 3, 2011 9:24 PM EDT

Dot--t even though I don't have a problem with gluten--I really appreciate your informative posts about the use of wheat in fast foods.


I will certainly pass the info on to people who do have problems with wheat.


 


BTW--understanding that coffee is not the best for me--and loving/craving things like Big Macs--over tgime I weaned myself off of Micky Ds completeky--and I now drink water with most meals and only sparingly drink coffee--usually to wake up with.


It can be done--IMO the trick is to do it slowly rather than cold turkey so your body adjusts to smaller and smaller doses of caffeine and the huge amounts of sugars etc in most of Micky Ds foods.


 

Flag Erey April 3, 2011 10:32 PM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 1:05AM, Ebon wrote:


I've never seen the attraction of coffee with fast food anyway. I mean, I love my coffee and drink collosal amounts of it but drinking hot drinks with fast food has always struck me as weird. I'd much rather have a Coke or Sprite.





I think if I read the OP correctly you would NOT want to drink Coke or anything with caffine in it with your fast food.  I guess a Sprite would be preferable. 

Flag Erey April 3, 2011 10:37 PM EDT

The whole wheat intolerance is something rather new.  I had first heard of it with one young woman i knew in college.  She was allergic to most foods it seemed and wheat was one of them.  Now I have a few friends who have real problems and celiac disease.  Also, I think my husband might have some issue with glutten.  If he can ever get to the doctor he might find out for sure.  I just have to wonder how we have such problems these days?  Maybe we were just unaware but it really just seems that all this crept up out of no where in the last few years. 

Flag solfeggio April 4, 2011 12:09 AM EDT

To answer Jane's comments about food discussions being of little importance in the great scheme of things -


1 - I happen to love to talk about food.


2 - Since we all have to eat, and we all (presumably) wish to eat as healthy as we can (within reason), I see no reason why people shouldn't talk about whatever scientific discovery relative to food and what we eat should not be discussed.


 


  

Flag Heretic_for_Christ April 4, 2011 12:38 AM EDT

Much ado about very little.


The major risk factor for type 2 diabetes is obesity, which creates a state of insulin resistance. If the prospect of type 2 diabetes scares you, correct or avoid obesity. The problem with stories like this, even if scientifically valid, is that they are clinically misleading. Such pronouncements invariably cause some people to think, "Oh! All I have to do is avoid drinking coffee when I eat deep-fried sugar twists..." In short, the caffeine connection is a relatively trivial point compared to the major lifestyle-related risks.


And since this thread has once again raised the ghost of What Did Primitive Man Eat? I will repeat what I have said before -- It doesn't matter what Ook the Caveman ate. Ook lived in an utterly different environment from how we live today. If you want to know how to eat healthy, forget about what this or that scholar has pronounced about Ook's diet; instead, look at current clinical and epidemiological research that provides clear evidence about dietary patterns and disease risk.

Flag Yavanna April 4, 2011 5:04 AM EDT

Apr 4, 2011 -- 12:09AM, solfeggio wrote:


To answer Jane's comments about food discussions being of little importance in the great scheme of things -


1 - I happen to love to talk about food.


2 - Since we all have to eat, and we all (presumably) wish to eat as healthy as we can (within reason), I see no reason why people shouldn't talk about whatever scientific discovery relative to food and what we eat should not be discussed.


 


 





Actually I think you love to talk about what you think shouldn't be food in the first place. ;)

Flag DotNotInOz April 4, 2011 6:18 AM EDT

Apr 3, 2011 -- 10:37PM, Erey wrote:

The whole wheat intolerance is something rather new.  I had first heard of it with one young woman i knew in college.  She was allergic to most foods it seemed and wheat was one of them.  Now I have a few friends who have real problems and celiac disease.  Also, I think my husband might have some issue with glutten.  If he can ever get to the doctor he might find out for sure.  I just have to wonder how we have such problems these days?  Maybe we were just unaware but it really just seems that all this crept up out of no where in the last few years. 




It is true, Erey, that wheat intolerance is fairly recently discovered. In fact, celiac disease is still misdiagnosed the vast majority of the time due to the fact that there aren't any consistently reliable blood tests and that it takes a particular sort of colonoscopy to determine intestinal damage to establish a definite diagnosis.


A lot of people who've gone gluten-free seem to be as I am--they just feel better and have fewer problems with respiratory congestion and digestion. I suspect that mine is a mild food allergy. I'd had digestive problems all my life, but they cleared up completely within a week of my going gluten and dairy free. Also, as long as I strictly avoid both wheat and dairy, I have very little to no sinus congestion. This time of year, I formerly would have been living on decongestants. 


You might do what I did, start cooking gluten-free and see how your hubby feels in a few weeks to a month. For some people, that's the only way to tell if going gluten-free will be helpful. It's a pain to do, especially when eating out, but it is doable with some practice. 


I suggest shopping a nearby health food store for a copy of Living Without magazine. It has really helpful lists in the back of each issue to guide you on what foods generally to avoid as well as having some great gluten-free recipes. Their product review section also provides helpful tips about new things to try. 



Flag writingal1 April 4, 2011 9:07 AM EDT

Solf--hi.


You say--


"2 - Since we all have to eat, and we all (presumably) wish to eat as healthy as we can (within reason), I see no reason why people shouldn't talk about whatever scientific discovery relative to food and what we eat should not be discussed."


I do  not understand why people come and post on threads they don't approve of and don't care about.


I personally think that what we eat is important to our health--so I read your food threads and oftren comment on my own ideas and experiences.


And I like to read posts like Dot's which contain a great deal of info.


I am thankful for anyne who has something of value to contribute and who does take the time to pass along info.


 

Flag writingal1 April 4, 2011 9:12 AM EDT

Jane--lifestyle-related diseases like Type Two Diabetes. obesity and other disease conditions that can be controlled/eliminated by lifestyle changes are on the rise and mortally so in the US.


If YOU don't want the info--don't read the thread.


A lot of us are interested in improving our health and and in sharing info.


I do not understand why you would bother to post on a thread you do NOT care about and are not interested in. It has the ring of harrassment to it....


 

Flag writingal1 April 4, 2011 9:18 AM EDT

Dot--hi.


You say in part--


"It is true, Erey, that wheat intolerance is fairly recently discovered. In fact, celiac disease is still misdiagnosed the vast majority of the time...."


 


This brings to mind when my sister was a baby and cried almost for the first nine months of her life. The first doctor seemed rerally puzzled and kept trying to blame my parents for not knowing how to take care of a baby--she was their third child. Finally a different doctor suggested that my sister had food allergy issues and found substitutes that she was able to digest. "MagicallY" she stopped her constant crying.


I am firmly on the side of MORE info about food/health-related issues--not less.


Thanks for all the info you're presenting here.


 

Flag Erey April 4, 2011 10:33 AM EDT

Apr 4, 2011 -- 12:09AM, solfeggio wrote:


To answer Jane's comments about food discussions being of little importance in the great scheme of things -


1 - I happen to love to talk about food.


2 - Since we all have to eat, and we all (presumably) wish to eat as healthy as we can (within reason), I see no reason why people shouldn't talk about whatever scientific discovery relative to food and what we eat should not be discussed.


 


  




I love to talk about food also, almost as much as I love to eat.  I wish to be healthy and I do believe health begins with what you put in your mouth.  But I also have epicurian interests also.

Flag Erey April 4, 2011 10:50 AM EDT

This sort of ties into the wheat intolerance we are discussing on this thread.  I read an article a few months ago - which I can't find at the moment.  Thsi article discusses this huge rise in nut allergies.  How nobody ever heard of a nut allergy 30 years ago and now you are having nut free schools  and just these kids who can't even be in the same room with a nut - let alone eat one.  Where has this come from?    And you certainly don't hear about children in Africa having all these nut problems.  Many places in Africa use alot of peanuts in the cuisine. 


What the article described was that in places where you are forced to eat more natural foods like for example Africa.  In places like that where there is really no processed food available and you have to eat with the seasons.  Something in season that you are eating now won't be available to you in a few months and you will be eating other things all together.  Also, the farming and crop raising techniques are less uniform and there is much more variation between the same crop than there is in the west.    This gives the 3rd world eater more variety and much more exposure and this builds up immunities in very small children.  Our children don't have the same kinds of immunities because the diet western children eat can be very unvaried.  Just alot of the same things over and over.   


I have alot of friends that are in the habit of feeding their children one of just a few dinners every evening while the parents have a different meal.  So the kid might rotate between three different dinners every night - hot dog and fruit, pizza and carrot sticks or mac and cheese.  Just the same things all the time. 


 


Anyway that made me wonder if it was the same sort of issue with wheat. 

Flag writingal1 April 4, 2011 10:56 AM EDT

If I remember correctly the allergies that are msot prominent are NOT to tree nuts but to peanuts.


There seems to be a major difference in how these two groups affect the body....


 


BTW--just because something is now RECOGNIZED when it formerly wasn't (like Dot's example of celiac disease) doesn't mean it has NOT been around for a long time.


Food allergies were no even understood or identified until very recently in human history.


 

Flag Erey April 4, 2011 11:04 AM EDT

True Wgal but nut allergies and most food allergies are easy to recognize.  You go in to a anaphalactic shock after you ingest them.  Your face gets red after you eat a strawberry.  Your tounge swells up after you eat a banana.  That is pretty easy to see cause and effect. 


I can understand how someone might miss a wheat allergy but not a nut allergy.  And now we have children so violently allergic that they simply cannot be in the same cafeteria with a pb&j sandwich.  Sharing the same area with that sandwich makes them violently ill.  That is NEW!

Flag writingal1 April 4, 2011 11:12 AM EDT

"True Wgal but nut allergies and most food allergies are easy to recognize"


 


You have to know what an "allergy" is befie you can recognize rthe symptoms.


 


BTW--not all allergic reactions are anaphylactic shock. That is the most extreme allergic reaction.


My sister had food allergies--for example--and never even came close to that. She just cried for the first nine months of her life....


Remember--the immune system is only now being understood. Until about 50 years ago no one knew what the lymph system and all its many different cells even DID.


And new kinds of cells are even now being discovered. Just because we know about it now do not assume it has always been known.


The history of medical science is very interesting for the way in which knowledge has been slowly acquired and refined.


 

Flag Erey April 4, 2011 1:31 PM EDT

I think you can have food allergies and never know you have them.  Perhaps even die of them never knowing that it was something in the food you ate which gave you such a poor health.  Certainly what Dot mentions with her wheat allergy having sinus congestion is not something you would ever put together.  You would think sinus congestion is due to pollen or something, not wheat.


However the symptoms of peanut allergies don't seem to have changed.  You have the same kinds of reactions to really nuts that you have always had.  Just we are seeing alot more of it and much more severe than ever before.

Flag DotNotInOz April 4, 2011 3:30 PM EDT

What the pediatric allergists who respond to parents' questions in Living Without magazine say is that they're learning that food allergies aren't necessarily obvious. Unfortunately, a good many that cause the symptoms I've had don't show up at all on allergy tests.


Both my parents had significant digestive problems that were never diagnosed as anything organically wrong. I suspect that both probably were wheat intolerant. For all I know, I could be celiac. However, as long as I've been mostly gluten-free but for the occasional lapse, it would do no good to undergo a scoping since I'd have to eat gluten regularly for a couple of weeks or more to damage my intestinal lining enough for celiac disease to be detectable. No thanks! I'm not willing to be sick again for that long a time to find out what I already know: I feel lots better and have no digestive problems when I avoid all gluten. 


My sister has had allergy tests but none have shown any results for the foods she knows she can't eat. She refused to drink milk as a child and told me not long ago that that was due to her feeling intensely nauseated every time she ingested anything containing milk. Naturally, the doctor urged Mom to tempt her with puddings and other foods containing milk so that she got adequate calcium. She said that all that stuff made her sick, but as a kid, she hadn't much choice but to eat it anyway. People simply didn't realize when she and I were kids that digestive upset could be caused by mild food allergies.


Also, allergists are now figuring out that people with respiratory allergy problems such as I had regularly each spring and fall often do far better once they identify foods that they may also be sensitive to and eliminate those foods from their diets. For some reason as yet unknown, allergic reactions can be linked so that eating foods you react to can make other allergic reactions worse even though you've not been around any respiratory allergens. I had almost no sense of smell for several years. Within a couple of weeks after cutting all gluten and dairy out of my diet, it gradually came back. I haven't taken a decongestant since late last summer when I was stupid and ate a lovely crusty dinner roll with a creme brulee for dessert at a favorite restaurant. I awoke the next morning with my sinuses going berserk, and my digestion was messed up for three days. I used to take decongestants daily in both spring and fall.


There's now even a condition that's been informally termed "gluten-brain" which manifests as an inability to concentrate, short-term memory lapses and general muzzy-headedness with sometimes symptoms that would suggest mental illness. MRI's may show indications of brain damage in such people. Take them off all gluten, and they gradually improve.


So, no, as Wgal said, allergies don't necessarily manifest in the extreme form of anaphylactic shock.


Also, there's evidence mounting that the extreme reaction of so many more children to peanuts as well as the dramatic increase in various allergies among children today may be due to our being far too clean. I see people on one Disney World board I read saying that they ALWAYS carry hand sanitizer and never let their kids go on public transportation or amusement rides without using hand sanitizer after each time. If one of their kids touches a railing anywhere, they make the kid use hand sanitizer. Can you imagine what they'd do if the kids came in the house covered with mud? Probably scrub them down with Clorox! Small wonder then that our immune systems may have so little real work to do that they turn to regarding foods as threats and triggering allergic reactions. That's one theory, anyway. 


All the preservatives, food colorings and artificial flavorings in foods have also been implicated. 

Flag Erey April 4, 2011 3:49 PM EDT

That is what I am talking about Dot the severe peanut allergies and other nut allergies.  the symptoms and responses have not changed.  We are not talking about kids who don't know they are allergic to peanuts and have sinus problems.  We are talking about kids who have the same sort of violent response to nuts that people always have.  Just as you say more severe and much more frequently.


I think yes, the hyper-santiation can be a culprit.  But also back to the food and the diversity in the food.  Take the Monsanto potato for example - the soil that is grown in is basically dead.  All microbial life is killed and then sterile nutrients are added.  So the Monsanto potato you are eating today at Wendy's Hamburgers for example is the same pototato you ate there 3 years ago, etc.  Different potatoes no diversity.  And it is not just potatoes  these kinds of uniform sterility is happening all over the food industry.  


Whereas our counterparts in the third world get all different kids of microbes every time they eat.    So it is not just that our kids don't eat yam greens like the kids in Africa might but that whatever kind of greens they eat or really any kind of produce lacks diversity in itself.

Flag Stardove April 4, 2011 5:16 PM EDT

Okay on the OP link (first one) there was a link to this article:


New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes

Scientists are reporting new evidence that drinking coffee may help prevent diabetes and that caffeine may be the ingredient largely responsible for this effect. Their findings, among the first animal studies to demonstrate this apparent link, appear in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry



Can it be both ways?  Drink coffee, but don't have fast food.  Being a vegetarian there is very little fast food out there which I do partake in.

Flag Christianlib April 4, 2011 5:22 PM EDT

Also, it's been shown recently that a little cinnamon every day will help reduce blood sugar.  Right on top of your morning coffee is a tasty place to sprinkle it--and, no, I don't mean at an overpriced Starbucks.  I mean on the coffee you make at home for about 10% of what Coffeebucks charges.

Flag Stardove April 4, 2011 5:32 PM EDT

Apr 4, 2011 -- 5:22PM, Christianlib wrote:


Also, it's been shown recently that a little cinnamon every day will help reduce blood sugar.  Right on top of your morning coffee is a tasty place to sprinkle it--and, no, I don't mean at an overpriced Starbucks.  I mean on the coffee you make at home for about 10% of what Coffeebucks charges.




I attempt to remember to take cinnamon pills everyday.  Most days I do remember.  Type 2 diabetes runs in my maternal family, so I want to be pro-active.


I taken to having local honey sprinkled with cinnamon on a tortilla. Good stuff.

Flag DotNotInOz April 4, 2011 6:23 PM EDT

Apr 4, 2011 -- 11:04AM, Erey wrote:

 I can understand how someone might miss a wheat allergy but not a nut allergy.



And I on the other hand can understand how someone might miss both. Allergies do not always manifest immediately by severe reactions such as anaphylaxis.


The violent allergic reaction to which you refer may either be the first indication of an allergy or may be the culmination of less severe or even unnoticed reactions that occurred for some time previously. There's no way to tell for certain, although allergists do say that it's always possible for someone with mild reactions suddenly and unpredictably to go into anaphylaxis which is why it's generally better to avoid any food to which a person reacts at all if it can be determined that is the source. 


And now we have children so violently allergic that they simply cannot be in the same cafeteria with a pb&j sandwich.  Sharing the same area with that sandwich makes them violently ill.  That is NEW!



I don't know. Perhaps such severe allergies are a very new phenomenon. But I think it important to realize that we don't know to what extent these children may have had mild reactions that suddenly became extreme ones.


There could easily be other causes such as the depleted soil you mentioned, hybridization and other deliberate alterations we've made in the plants, chemical fertilizers and pesticides--who knows?

Flag drawout April 5, 2011 5:03 PM EDT

So,as a type two diabetic I now need to drop coffee and choose between crack cocain or crystal meth.

Flag Christianlib April 5, 2011 5:30 PM EDT

DO,


Modern life seems to be a constant string of "Which Drug This Week" choices.

Flag rangerken April 12, 2011 10:03 PM EDT

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