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Pause Switch to Standard View Eating more fiber could mean longer life
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Flag solfeggio February 17, 2011 9:50 PM EST
An interesting new study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that the more fiber you consume, the better your chances of living longer:

www.sci-tech-today.com/story.xhtml?story...

archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extrac...

And you're now saying: We all have to die someday, so who the hell cares?

Well, yes but, regardless of that fact, we'd all like to have as painless a death as possible, and the high fiber diet has been shown to lower the risk of developing a nasty disease like cancer in men, for example, as well as a lower risk of heart disease in both men and women.

Does anybody really want to have a heart attack if it could possibly be avoided by a change in diet?

So, what do they mean by 'fiber'?  They mean fruits, veggies, legumes and grains. 

www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09333...

Oh, and BTW, there's no fiber in meat, milk or eggs.

Flag jane2 February 17, 2011 10:29 PM EST

Feb 17, 2011 -- 9:50PM, solfeggio wrote:

An interesting new study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that the more fiber you consume, the better your chances of living longer:

www.sci-tech-today.com/story.xhtml?story...

archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extrac...

And you're now saying: We all have to die someday, so who the hell cares?

Well, yes but, regardless of that fact, we'd all like to have as painless a death as possible, and the high fiber diet has been shown to lower the risk of developing a nasty disease like cancer in men, for example, as well as a lower risk of heart disease in both men and women.

Does anybody really want to have a heart attack if it could possibly be avoided by a change in diet?

So, what do they mean by 'fiber'?  They mean fruits, veggies, legumes and grains. 

www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09333...

Oh, and BTW, there's no fiber in meat, milk or eggs.



Back again to being overly concerned with what we eat. Be aware, be a bit wise and enjoy life and food.




Flag mytmouse57 February 17, 2011 11:49 PM EST

I know one thing.


It makes you poop better.

Flag writingal1 February 18, 2011 12:00 AM EST

Jane says--


"Back again to being overly concerned with what we eat. Be aware, be a bit wise and enjoy life and food."


 


 


Does the term "quality of life" mean anything to you?

Flag writingal1 February 18, 2011 12:02 AM EST

Higher fiber food also make you feel fuller after ingesting fewer calories too.


Which means a possible lower weight--also healthier.

Flag Girlchristian February 18, 2011 10:44 AM EST

Feb 17, 2011 -- 10:29PM, jane2 wrote:


Feb 17, 2011 -- 9:50PM, solfeggio wrote:

An interesting new study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that the more fiber you consume, the better your chances of living longer:

www.sci-tech-today.com/story.xhtml?story...

archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extrac...

And you're now saying: We all have to die someday, so who the hell cares?

Well, yes but, regardless of that fact, we'd all like to have as painless a death as possible, and the high fiber diet has been shown to lower the risk of developing a nasty disease like cancer in men, for example, as well as a lower risk of heart disease in both men and women.

Does anybody really want to have a heart attack if it could possibly be avoided by a change in diet?

So, what do they mean by 'fiber'?  They mean fruits, veggies, legumes and grains. 

www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09333...

Oh, and BTW, there's no fiber in meat, milk or eggs.



Back again to being overly concerned with what we eat. Be aware, be a bit wise and enjoy life and food.







Agree. I get plenty of fiber and make sure of it, but I don't obsess over it. IMO, everything in moderation is good and leads to the best quality of life for me.

Flag Christianlib February 18, 2011 11:04 AM EST

We eat either oatmeal or yogurt with flax seed meal every morning, and have nothing in the house but whole wheat breads--and that includes our Friday Pizza crust, and the occasional batch of biscuits.


 


Of course, at our age, it's about trying to keep cholesterol out of our bloodstreams.  AND the fact that whole wheat tastes better.

Flag loveontheair February 18, 2011 12:20 PM EST

Hello,


 


I'm lactose intolerant so I will not go near oatmeal and mush just as I stay away from yogurt.  I rarely eat whole wheat bread--bread of any kind. When I do I choose a French bagget. My cholesterol is 135. I drink green teas. I drink alcohol in moderation. I eat meat in moderation. I eat sweets in moderation. I'm more interested in my sugar intake than fiber or meat. My $.02


 


love

Flag newsjunkie February 18, 2011 12:31 PM EST

I'm with jane and girlchristian. The middle way is usually best. I do eat a certain amount of crap, but a lot of good stuff, too. I work out at least 6 hours per week. That's a lot more than I used to, and good enough for me. 

Flag Yavanna February 18, 2011 2:12 PM EST

Feb 18, 2011 -- 12:31PM, newsjunkie wrote:


I'm with jane and girlchristian. The middle way is usually best. I do eat a certain amount of crap, but a lot of good stuff, too. I work out at least 6 hours per week. That's a lot more than I used to, and good enough for me. 





I agree. With how much dietary standards fluctuate, one could dig themselves an early grave worrying about them and trying to keep up. Moderation, discipline and good, healthy exercise are the way to go.

Flag Ebon February 18, 2011 3:30 PM EST

Feb 18, 2011 -- 2:12PM, Yavanna wrote:

I agree. With how much dietary standards fluctuate, one could dig themselves an early grave worrying about them and trying to keep up. Moderation, discipline and good, healthy exercise are the way to go.



^ This.


I already eat a lot of whole grain foods (although CL, if you have a recipe for whole wheat pizza dough, please pass it along) but the key to pretty much everything we eat is moderation. Nutrition experts recognise this, that's why the RDA exists, to give you some idea of how much of anything your body can handle. A couple of glasses of wine or scotch every so often won't do you any harm but a couple of bottles of either a day and you have a problem. A nice lean steak once in a while won't kill you but if you ate nothing else every day, you're probably going to die. Moderation in all things.

Flag writingal1 February 18, 2011 5:22 PM EST

Wow--I woder what the psychology is for all the resistance to info about eating in a slightly more healthy way?


 


I'm an athlete and I DO pay attention to nutrition so that my body will work at its optimum.


And you kow what?--I feel a lot better since I have started eating 5-10 servings of fruit and veggies per day (lots of fiber in those--and lots of other healthy stuff as well) and I sleep much better and have a much more positive attitude towards life in general--because I feel better.


I am sorry that is so "scary" to some.....


I wonder why just the prospect of being healthier is so frightening?

Flag writingal1 February 18, 2011 5:28 PM EST

It's interesting to see that paying attention to what one puts into one's body is considered an "obsession" by some.


All I do is this--


 


when I go to the  supermarket I head for the fresh fruit and vegetable section and stock up and pass by the high-in-fat food section.


That's it.


How anyone could consider that an "obsession" says a lot more about the one making the characterization than about the one buying fresh produce and passing by high fat content foods.


 

Flag Yavanna February 18, 2011 7:30 PM EST

Feb 18, 2011 -- 5:22PM, writingal1 wrote:


Wow--I woder what the psychology is for all the resistance to info about eating in a slightly more healthy way?


 


I'm an athlete and I DO pay attention to nutrition so that my body will work at its optimum.


And you kow what?--I feel a lot better since I have started eating 5-10 servings of fruit and veggies per day (lots of fiber in those--and lots of other healthy stuff as well) and I sleep much better and have a much more positive attitude towards life in general--because I feel better.


I am sorry that is so "scary" to some.....


I wonder why just the prospect of being healthier is so frightening?





Um, that's not scary. That's what we're all saying we do. Do you want us to be unhealthy or something? =P

Flag writingal1 February 18, 2011 7:33 PM EST

"Um, that's not scary. That's what we're all saying we do. Do you want us to be unhealthy or something? =P"


 


 


It's scary to the people who call wanting to put healthier food into one's body an "obsession."


 

Flag Yavanna February 18, 2011 7:44 PM EST

Feb 18, 2011 -- 7:33PM, writingal1 wrote:


"Um, that's not scary. That's what we're all saying we do. Do you want us to be unhealthy or something? =P"


 


 


It's scary to the people who call wanting to put healthier food into one's body an "obsession."


 





You are the first person in the thread to use the word "obsession".

Flag Girlchristian February 18, 2011 7:47 PM EST

Feb 18, 2011 -- 7:44PM, Yavanna wrote:


Feb 18, 2011 -- 7:33PM, writingal1 wrote:


"Um, that's not scary. That's what we're all saying we do. Do you want us to be unhealthy or something? =P"


 


 


It's scary to the people who call wanting to put healthier food into one's body an "obsession."


 





You are the first person in the threat to use the word "obsession".





Yes, she is. I used the word "obsess" but in reference to myself and my own eating habits and not anyone else.

Flag solfeggio February 18, 2011 9:15 PM EST

Hi, writingal -


Thanks for your sensible, no-nonsense posts!  Great, down-to-earth advice that everybody should follow.  And, as you so rightly point out, quality of life does matter.  You don't have to obsess about food, but people should be informed about what is healthy and what isn't, so they can make good choices.


It always amuses me when, after posting something about a healthier diet, people always start in with how, if you 'worry' about what you eat, life isn't any fun, or how dietary rules are always changing or, best of all, how 'moderation' is best.


And nobody ever defines 'moderation.'  I think what most people would like to believe is that it means you can eat anything and everything your little heart desires and not worry about it.


At any rate, as numerous medical studies have shown, the high-fiber diet is best for us, whether people want to believe it or not.  And this is not something that's going to change.


And, as far as I've ever been able to discern, no studies have ever shown that a meat diet is good for anybody outside of carnivores.


 


 

Flag solfeggio February 18, 2011 9:27 PM EST

Christianlib -


You are so right about keeping cholesterol out of the bloodstream.  In fact, I think this is something that should be emphasised.  Like you, we eat oatmeal with flax seed every morning, and I think it tastes very good.  And, like you, we are into the whole grains, too.


And, here's an interesting article about creating a healthier pizza.  If you bake it longer, you boost the antioxidant content:


www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/07...


As far as I'm concerned, eating high fiber is no problem and doesn't require a Ph.D. in nutrition to achieve.


 

Flag Yavanna February 19, 2011 12:07 AM EST

Feb 18, 2011 -- 9:15PM, solfeggio wrote:


Hi, writingal -


Thanks for your sensible, no-nonsense posts!  Great, down-to-earth advice that everybody should follow.  And, as you so rightly point out, quality of life does matter.  You don't have to obsess about food, but people should be informed about what is healthy and what isn't, so they can make good choices.


It always amuses me when, after posting something about a healthier diet, people always start in with how, if you 'worry' about what you eat, life isn't any fun, or how dietary rules are always changing or, best of all, how 'moderation' is best.


And nobody ever defines 'moderation.'  I think what most people would like to believe is that it means you can eat anything and everything your little heart desires and not worry about it.


At any rate, as numerous medical studies have shown, the high-fiber diet is best for us, whether people want to believe it or not.  And this is not something that's going to change.


And, as far as I've ever been able to discern, no studies have ever shown that a meat diet is good for anybody outside of carnivores.


 


 





No one defines moderation because we all know what it means. If you don't, please say so and we'll get the dictionary out for you. ;)

Flag solfeggio February 19, 2011 10:04 PM EST

The definition of 'moderation' is too vague and general a term to have any meaningful use when talking about diet.


Which is why so many people like to throw the term around without giving it any serious thought.


 


 

Flag Girlchristian February 19, 2011 10:12 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:04PM, solfeggio wrote:


The definition of 'moderation' is too vague and general a term to have any meaningful use when talking about diet.


Which is why so many people like to throw the term around without giving it any serious thought.


 


 





The definition of "moderation" is not too vague. It simply means you avoid extremes or excesses on both sides. So, yes, I eat meat, but I don't eat it every day or every meal. Yes, I have wine or drink, but I don't drink every day. Yes, I enjoy dessert, but not with every meal. Yes, I make sure I get enough fiber, fruit, and veggies, but I don't freak out if a meal doesn't have enough of any one of those. Yes, I work hard to eat healthy and exercise, but I also enjoy eating stuff that is good, but may not be healthy and I don't judge myself if I skip a day or two of exercise. My quality of life is great (despite what WGal implies).

Flag writingal1 February 19, 2011 10:15 PM EST

Solf--hi.


Maybe by "moderation" they mean eating only HALF the recommended daily dietary fiber? ;)


 


Thanks for your kind words. Most of what I know I started to learn when I started doing daily workouts that include biking 20 miles and 1+ hours of weightlifting. etc.


The more athletic activity I engaged in the more I realized the importance of giving my body the nutrients it needed to do what I was asking of it.


And not impeding its excellent functioning with fats and other empty calories even "in moderation.'


 

Flag writingal1 February 19, 2011 10:19 PM EST

GC says--


"My quality of life is great (despite what WGal implies"


 


 


My post about quality of life was in reply to a post of Jane's-- a fact made very clear in my post.


Interesting that you have to comb replies to other people's posts to find "insults" to complain about.


 

Flag Girlchristian February 19, 2011 10:24 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:19PM, writingal1 wrote:


GC says--


"My quality of life is great (despite what WGal implies"


 


 


My post about quality of life was in reply to a post of Jane's-- a fact made very clear in my post.


Interesting that you have to comb replies to other people's posts to find "insults" to complain about.


 




I didn't take it as an insult. Your response was to the bolded part of Jane's response regarding being overly concerned about one eats. You then bolded her statement (specifically about being overly concerned about what one eats) and asked about quality of life. My quality of life isn't diminished because I don't watch every little thing I eat or drink.
But, it's interesting that you classified what you said as an "insult."

Flag Roodog February 19, 2011 10:29 PM EST

With our liberties being strangled, and a move to enslave our kids as child laborers to further impoverish our nation, who really wants to live longer?

Flag solfeggio February 19, 2011 10:31 PM EST

Like writingal, I am very conscious of the dangers of fats and avoid saturated and transfats like the plague.  As well, I am a true believer in the benefits of getting lots of regular exercise.  For me, that means an hour of brisk walking every day.


I really do believe that we should think hard about what we're eating, and choose carefully.  I really do choose to eat only foods that I know will benefit my body, which is why I won't go near fast food, snack foods like potato chips, or processed sugars, either.


It may sound like a lot of bother, but our bodies are worth it! 


 

Flag writingal1 February 19, 2011 10:32 PM EST

Roo--another one who doesn't care about their own quality of life?

Flag writingal1 February 19, 2011 10:36 PM EST

GC--I'm sorry you feel so bad that you feel you have to grub for every imagined way to "insult" someone who is trying very hard not to address you directly about eating and food issues since you posted about an eating disorder.


I try never to bother people with that kind of problem.


I will go back to not responding because I don't want to make things any worse.

Flag Roodog February 19, 2011 10:45 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:32PM, writingal1 wrote:


Roo--another one who doesn't care about their own quality of life?





I question whether if we as Americans have anything to live for.


It may be better for us to die.

Flag writingal1 February 19, 2011 10:51 PM EST

I worked in enough hospitals and morgues and watched enough people die lingering painful deaths from conditions that could have been easily prevented had they but paid attention to their own bodies to have a very different outlook about death and dying  from your faux melancholie.

Flag Girlchristian February 19, 2011 11:09 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:31PM, solfeggio wrote:


Like writingal, I am very conscious of the dangers of fats and avoid saturated and transfats like the plague.  As well, I am a true believer in the benefits of getting lots of regular exercise.  For me, that means an hour of brisk walking every day.


I really do believe that we should think hard about what we're eating, and choose carefully.  I really do choose to eat only foods that I know will benefit my body, which is why I won't go near fast food, snack foods like potato chips, or processed sugars, either.


It may sound like a lot of bother, but our bodies are worth it! 


 




Yes, I agree that we should choose foods that benefit our body, but I where you and I disagree is that I see no harm in having potato chips occasionally or creme brulee occasionally or even meat occasionally. I see no reason to cut out the fun, but slightly unhealthy stuff so that I can live until 80 instead of 78. I eat bad foods and good foods and my cholesterol levels are better than good, my BMI is very low, and, outside of stress, I'm pretty healthy.

Flag Girlchristian February 19, 2011 11:14 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:36PM, writingal1 wrote:


GC--I'm sorry you feel so bad that you feel you have to grub for every imagined way to "insult" someone who is trying very hard not to address you directly about eating and food issues since you posted about an eating disorder.


I try never to bother people with that kind of problem.


I will go back to not responding because I don't want to make things any worse.




Wgal, I don't feel bad about anything in my life and I have not insulted you and up until now, I didn't take anything you said as an insult.


Yes, I have had an eating disorder. I watch what I eat and am quite healthy these days. And, according to every nutritionist that I had to see to get better, part of being healthy is eating all things, healthy and unhealthy, in moderation so, unlike you and Solf, I will allow myself potato chips and I will allow myself creme brulee and I do exercise, but I certainly won't over-exercise. At the end of the day, my diet consists of a lot of fruits and veggies and organic meats. I do though enjoy french fries and dark chocolate. [tried to insert the smiley face, but it's not showing up]

Flag Yavanna February 19, 2011 11:19 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:15PM, writingal1 wrote:


Solf--hi.


Maybe by "moderation" they mean eating only HALF the recommended daily dietary fiber? ;)


 


Thanks for your kind words. Most of what I know I started to learn when I started doing daily workouts that include biking 20 miles and 1+ hours of weightlifting. etc.


The more athletic activity I engaged in the more I realized the importance of giving my body the nutrients it needed to do what I was asking of it.


And not impeding its excellent functioning with fats and other empty calories even "in moderation.'


 




Actually by moderation we tend to mean eating healthy amounts of everything and not overdoing it. You know... like the word means. ;)

Flag Roodog February 19, 2011 11:42 PM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:51PM, writingal1 wrote:


I worked in enough hospitals and morgues and watched enough people die lingering painful deaths from conditions that could have been easily prevented had they but paid attention to their own bodies to have a very different outlook about death and dying  from your faux melancholie.





My melancholy is quite real, WG,


Quality of life is more than physical well being, it calls for hopes and dreams. What I see here in today's society drives me to an almost suicidal despair.

Flag Stardove February 20, 2011 12:19 AM EST

Feb 19, 2011 -- 11:42PM, Roodog wrote:


Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:51PM, writingal1 wrote:


I worked in enough hospitals and morgues and watched enough people die lingering painful deaths from conditions that could have been easily prevented had they but paid attention to their own bodies to have a very different outlook about death and dying  from your faux melancholie.





My melancholy is quite real, WG,


Quality of life is more than physical well being, it calls for hopes and dreams. What I see here in today's society drives me to an almost suicidal despair.



Roodog, I take talk of suicide very seriously.  This is not something to casually mention even on a social site like Beliefnet. 


If you are truly having thoughts of suicidal despair please reach out for help.



Suicide is not chosen; it happens
when pain exceeds
resources for coping with pain.


Please click on the link.


Or call: 800-273-8255


National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), a free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center to you.

Flag Roodog February 20, 2011 12:54 AM EST

Feb 20, 2011 -- 12:19AM, Stardove wrote:


Feb 19, 2011 -- 11:42PM, Roodog wrote:


Feb 19, 2011 -- 10:51PM, writingal1 wrote:


I worked in enough hospitals and morgues and watched enough people die lingering painful deaths from conditions that could have been easily prevented had they but paid attention to their own bodies to have a very different outlook about death and dying  from your faux melancholie.





My melancholy is quite real, WG,


Quality of life is more than physical well being, it calls for hopes and dreams. What I see here in today's society drives me to an almost suicidal despair.



Roodog, I take talk of suicide very seriously.  This is not something to casually mention even on a social site like Beliefnet. 


If you are truly having thoughts of suicidal despair please reach out for help.



Suicide is not chosen; it happens
when pain exceeds
resources for coping with pain.


Please click on the link.


Or call: 800-273-8255


National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), a free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center to you.





Thank you for your concern. The despair comes and goes in my life, it is my cross to bear. I usually count on my failing health to take me away.


Back to the topic, I hope to grow vegetables this spring/ summer to offset the depressing rise of cost in food. It may be practical for all of us to eat less red meat,and more vegetables for the sake of making ends meet instead of philosophical or ideological reasons. Most of us cannot raise our own livestock but we surely can turn our flower gardens into vegetable gardens.

Flag tmore35 February 20, 2011 8:56 AM EST

I have not read every post in this thread, but I've read enough to think that I have something to contribute.


Yesterday I returned home from the hospital after experiencing my second heart attack in 16 months.  Fortunately, this second one was not as grave as the first.  Another stent was inserted and after a day in the hospital I was alowed to go home.


My question to my doctor was, "How did this happen?"  After the first heart attack I followed every instruction, took all medication regularly, excercised every day, and was very careful about my diet. I was never overweight, don't smoke, and use alcahol in moderation (whatever that means). Fruits and veggies were always my favorite components to any meal, I always prefered whole grain bread to white.  I have not eaten any fast food for 16 months, and was not a big consumer of that stuff before then.  I reduced my red meat intake, added Omgea 3 oil,  and a variety of other of recommended suppliments.  So..What happened?


I do think that many of us may be led to believe that if we eat a "proper diet", add this or that suppliment, cut some things out and add others in, we will be gaurenteed good health, and, if we carefully measure every mouthful for whatever good or bad elements may be contained within we will be able to control the condition of our bodies.  This is not necessarily true, and it can lead to an unhealthy obsession. Prudence is what is called for.


In my case it is likely that genetics has made a contribution to my cardiac problems. This is a major area in life we have absolutely no control over. My mom and her five brothers and sisters all had heart trouble.  However, most of them lived into their 80s, after going through heart attacks, open heart surgeries, medications and other procedures.  I really do not know what my future holds.  I can only do whatever I think is best for me, and maintain an optimistic attitude.


As for "quality of life", I think each of us has to determine for ourselves just what that means to us, and then take the necessary steps to achieve it. Likely, it will be different for everyone. It depends on circumstances, personal preference, and individual personalities.  None of us has the right to determine for another what "quality of life" means.     

Flag MysticWanderer February 20, 2011 12:18 PM EST

Feb 20, 2011 -- 8:56AM, tmore35 wrote:


I have not read every post in this thread, but I've read enough to think that I have something to contribute.


Yesterday I returned home from the hospital after experiencing my second heart attack in 16 months.  Fortunately, this second one was not as grave as the first.  Another stent was inserted and after a day in the hospital I was alowed to go home.


My question to my doctor was, "How did this happen?"  After the first heart attack I followed every instruction, took all medication regularly, excercised every day, and was very careful about my diet. I was never overweight, don't smoke, and use alcahol in moderation (whatever that means). Fruits and veggies were always my favorite components to any meal, I always prefered whole grain bread to white.  I have not eaten any fast food for 16 months, and was not a big consumer of that stuff before then.  I reduced my red meat intake, added Omgea 3 oil,  and a variety of other of recommended suppliments.  So..What happened?


I do think that many of us may be led to believe that if we eat a "proper diet", add this or that suppliment, cut some things out and add others in, we will be gaurenteed good health, and, if we carefully measure every mouthful for whatever good or bad elements may be contained within we will be able to control the condition of our bodies.  This is not necessarily true, and it can lead to an unhealthy obsession. Prudence is what is called for.


In my case it is likely that genetics has made a contribution to my cardiac problems. This is a major area in life we have absolutely no control over. My mom and her five brothers and sisters all had heart trouble.  However, most of them lived into their 80s, after going through heart attacks, open heart surgeries, medications and other procedures.  I really do not know what my future holds.  I can only do whatever I think is best for me, and maintain an optimistic attitude.


As for "quality of life", I think each of us has to determine for ourselves just what that means to us, and then take the necessary steps to achieve it. Likely, it will be different for everyone. It depends on circumstances, personal preference, and individual personalities.  None of us has the right to determine for another what "quality of life" means.     




Nice point.  By the way the single best predicting factor for longevity is the age at death of a person's parents.  Of course the nutrition, smoking and such are MODIFIABLE risk factors unlike genetics.  You must play the hand you are dealt but you can play it wisely or foolishly ... or for fun!  All are valid choices.

Flag writingal1 February 20, 2011 5:34 PM EST

GC says--


", part of being healthy is eating all things, healthy and unhealthy, in moderation so, unlike you and Solf, I will allow myself potato chips and I will allow myself creme brulee and I do exercise, but I certainly won't over-exercise"


 


 


Neither Solf nor I has said anything about not enjoying the kinds of foods you mention.


Again you mischarecterize what has been said (and invetn things that have NOT been said) in order to try to make us out to be "extreme" in some way known only to yourself....


And I find it interesting that you have not inquired about WHY I have such a workout regimen.


I am finding this thread and the "sexist" thread to be very enlightening about some very old-fashioned ideas that still seem to lurk even in the 21st century.


 

Flag jane2 February 20, 2011 5:49 PM EST

Feb 20, 2011 -- 5:34PM, writingal1 wrote:


GC says--


", part of being healthy is eating all things, healthy and unhealthy, in moderation so, unlike you and Solf, I will allow myself potato chips and I will allow myself creme brulee and I do exercise, but I certainly won't over-exercise"


 


 


Neither Solf nor I has said anything about not enjoying the kinds of foods you mention.


Again you mischarecterize what has been said (and invetn things that have NOT been said) in order to try to make us out to be "extreme" in some way known only to yourself....


And I find it interesting that you have not inquired about WHY I have such a workout regimen.


I am finding this thread and the "sexist" thread to be very enlightening about some very old-fashioned ideas that still seem to lurk even in the 21st century.


 




WG


You have axes to grind. Not all of us do. Why would we wonder about your work-out ?




Flag mytmouse57 February 20, 2011 8:55 PM EST

I work out a lot, or gravitate toward the heaviest tasks I can at my job because I like it. I like physical exertion, and always have.


That's not for everybody, nor is it required to be healthy.


"Quality of life" to me, it would seem, means doing things you like.

Flag writingal1 February 20, 2011 8:56 PM EST

Offering suggestions--based on experience--on how to possibly be a little healthier is an "axe to grind"?


I continue to wonder about the psychological bases for the  extreme reaction against such common sense suggestions as we have seen here.

Flag solfeggio February 20, 2011 9:12 PM EST

Well, yes, quality of life could, in general, mean enjoying yourself and doing things you like.  But, a lot depends upon what it is you like to do.


If what you like is steaks larded with fat, or driving everywhere instead of walking, then, obviously, you may think you have a good quality of life, but you body will eventually tell you otherwise.


And, yes, it is true that genetics does play a part in longevity, and we can't do anything about that, but that is why we do have to think so seriously about diet, and also exercise, because those are areas in which we have total control.


Generally speaking, humans do seem to be very tough creatures whose bodies can take a lot of abuse.  But, this is only a general statement, and it doesn't apply to everybody.  If diabetes runs in your family, then you would be well advised to adopt a low-glycemic diet, for example.  And if you had a parent who died of a heart attack, you really shouldn't smoke.


We're mainly talking about diet here, but I think we cannot emphasise enough the importance of exercise, either.  Humans developed our long legs for the express purpose of moving them!  We're meant to walk and run.  And, like mytmouse and writingal, I enjoy exercise to the point where, if for some reason I am not able to get in my daily walk, I really feel as if something important is missing for that day.


Anybody who has read the Sue Grafton novels will know what I'm talking about.


 

Flag jane2 February 20, 2011 9:16 PM EST

Feb 20, 2011 -- 8:56PM, writingal1 wrote:


Offering suggestions--based on experience--on how to possibly be a little healthier is an "axe to grind"?


I continue to wonder about the psychological bases for the  extreme reaction against such common sense suggestions as we have seen here.




Many suggestions here are superflous to some posters..

Flag solfeggio February 20, 2011 9:21 PM EST

That's probably true, Jane, but you have to take into consideration the fact that there may be lurkers who don't post but do read what people say.   And, it is just possible that one of them might learn something that would help this person to live a healthier life.


That's what I always consider, anyway, when writing something.  The regulars are pretty familiar with where everybody stands, but there will always be newcomers and lurkers who could benefit from a little good diet advice.


 

Flag jane2 February 20, 2011 9:30 PM EST

Feb 20, 2011 -- 9:21PM, solfeggio wrote:


That's probably true, Jane, but you have to take into consideration the fact that there may be lurkers who don't post but do read what people say.   And, it is just possible that one of them might learn something that would help this person to live a healthier life.


That's what I always consider, anyway, when writing something.  The regulars are pretty familiar with where everybody stands, but there will always be newcomers and lurkers who could benefit from a little good diet advice.


 




Tongue in Cheek, Solf


I thought that was why God created The Today Show.......................




Flag writingal1 February 21, 2011 5:53 PM EST

For people who might be interested in adding a little more fiber to their daily nutritional intake--


Two delicious suggestions--


1--I have a friend who makes oatmeal most mornings (lots of fiber) and slices up and adds whatever fresh fruit is in season just before she eats the oatmeal. Her personal preferences are for bananas and also blueberries but she says that other fruit is just as yummy.


2--I have never been a "granola-type person"--but I accidentally purchased some from my local produce market and found that the kind they sell is so good it doesn't even need milk added  but can be eaten as a snack whle reading etc.


My to fave kinds--"Peach Cobbler Granola" and "Cherry Cobbler Granoloa." Each one contains the fruit in the title plus other fruit and some nuts and coconut.


I never in my life thought I'd be telling someone else--"This granola is so good it tastes like a sweet dessert.'


 These are from the Sunflower Markets that we have in the southwest and come in a really handy resealable bag.


 


Do others here have good-tasting suggestions for getting more fiber?

Flag writingal1 February 21, 2011 5:56 PM EST

Feb 20, 2011 -- 9:21PM, solfeggio wrote:


That's probably true, Jane, but you have to take into consideration the fact that there may be lurkers who don't post but do read what people say.   And, it is just possible that one of them might learn something that would help this person to live a healthier life.


That's what I always consider, anyway, when writing something.  The regulars are pretty familiar with where everybody stands, but there will always be newcomers and lurkers who could benefit from a little good diet advice.


 





Solf--hi. I always keep the reading-but-not-posting people in mind when I post info.


I've been a college teacher--have you taught? It may be a teaching mindset....;)

Flag writingal1 February 22, 2011 12:15 AM EST

While at the store I thought of another tip for a tasty way to increase fiber intake--most stores now carry "Multi-grain" pastas which have significantly more fiber than the single grain white pastas.


An added benefit is that these pastas usually have a delicious "nutlike" flavor and most stores have them in their own store brands so that the price is not significantly different from the bleached pastas.


Use them the way you'd use the bleached single-grain pastas. Once you taste it you might find yourself coming up with additional ways to use them because they are so delicious.


 

Flag IreneAdler February 22, 2011 12:33 PM EST

Feb 21, 2011 -- 5:53PM, writingal1 wrote:


For people who might be interested in adding a little more fiber to their daily nutritional intake--


Two delicious suggestions--


1--I have a friend who makes oatmeal most mornings (lots of fiber) and slices up and adds whatever fresh fruit is in season just before she eats the oatmeal. Her personal preferences are for bananas and also blueberries but she says that other fruit is just as yummy.


2--I have never been a "granola-type person"--but I accidentally purchased some from my local produce market and found that the kind they sell is so good it doesn't even need milk added  but can be eaten as a snack whle reading etc.


My to fave kinds--"Peach Cobbler Granola" and "Cherry Cobbler Granoloa." Each one contains the fruit in the title plus other fruit and some nuts and coconut.


I never in my life thought I'd be telling someone else--"This granola is so good it tastes like a sweet dessert.'


 These are from the Sunflower Markets that we have in the southwest and come in a really handy resealable bag.


 


Do others here have good-tasting suggestions for getting more fiber?






Adding a few nuts to the cereal.  Try more than just oatmeal: Teff, amaranth, millet, quinoa, barley, kamut, etc.


 


Adding some veggies to the pasta (Might need to par boil them or cook them through first). Sometimes pasta needs the good crunch of celery!


 I like making casseroles with lots of veggies (onions,celery, spinach, carrot, tomato, broc, water chestnuts, swiss chard, mushrooms, green peppers-not fond of these myself), some sort of starch (corn, beans, potato, winter squash  or whole grain pasta), and a little meat. For binding I use a little yogurt. Sometimes such creations are more stew-like as I start with a tomato-based product. One can get very creative with the flavor combos and use of spices in such things too. 


 Irene.


 

Flag writingal1 February 24, 2011 12:23 PM EST

Irene--thanks! That's a lot of good ideas. I am already making some notes for my next trip to the produce market.


I think the yogurt is an especially good idea since it is so much lower in fat and calories than a white sauce would be. I am going to try that this week--I have some Greek yogurt ready to use for that.


I sometimes use extra virgin olive oil (has more flavor) as the sauce when I put fresh lightly steamed veggies like broccoli, asperagus, cauliflower in with pasta. And then add some herbs etc to taste.


I hear that lightly steamed greens like spinach or kale or chard are also yummy with pasta. I haven't tried those yet but will soon as the weather warms up when I prefer lighter meals.


 Also I noticed in the produce store I go to that they are now carrying durham wheat pasta. They have a big section with many different shapes/kinds of pasta. The durham wheat pasta is higher in fiber and protein and other nutrients--and has that nuttier fuller flavor.


And also is more filling since it is processed more slowly by the body than bleached flour pasta.


 

Flag Ebon February 24, 2011 12:26 PM EST

Lib, if you're still reading, the wholewheat pizza was delicious. Thanks for the recipe.

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 12:29 PM EST

WG,


I often stir fresh baby spinach leaves directly into still-steaming pasta.  Cooks the just enough.


 


I LOVE a simple pasta dish of just pasta, extra virgin olive oil, minced fresh garlic, the spinach leaves, and a light dusting of grated Pecorino Romano cheese.  Don't cook either the garlic or the spinach, just stir them into the hot pasta.

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 12:30 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 12:26PM, Ebon wrote:


Lib, if you're still reading, the wholewheat pizza was delicious. Thanks for the recipe.





 


You're quite welcome.


We, of course, had it too on Friday last.  And will tomorrow night.

Flag writingal1 February 24, 2011 12:32 PM EST

CL--Mmm! I just brought home a big container of baby spinach from the produce store so your recipe is very timely. Thanks so much. I am going to try it in the next few days.


 

Flag IreneAdler February 24, 2011 1:17 PM EST

 


Oh, yes- the pasta, spinach and parmesan cheese is a fave at my home. Even Limpy the dog enjoys it. Course, she does spit out the spinach while going ape over the rest.


 


Irene.

Flag Girlchristian February 24, 2011 3:45 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 12:29PM, Christianlib wrote:


WG,


I often stir fresh baby spinach leaves directly into still-steaming pasta.  Cooks the just enough.


 


I LOVE a simple pasta dish of just pasta, extra virgin olive oil, minced fresh garlic, the spinach leaves, and a light dusting of grated Pecorino Romano cheese.  Don't cook either the garlic or the spinach, just stir them into the hot pasta.





I make the same dish, but add sun-dried tomatoes.

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 4:21 PM EST

Yep, a good addition.


 


In fact, this is one of those good, basic dishes on which many variations can be built.

Flag loveontheair February 24, 2011 4:32 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 12:29PM, Christianlib wrote:


WG,


I often stir fresh baby spinach leaves directly into still-steaming pasta.  Cooks the just enough.


 


I LOVE a simple pasta dish of just pasta, extra virgin olive oil, minced fresh garlic, the spinach leaves, and a light dusting of grated Pecorino Romano cheese.  Don't cook either the garlic or the spinach, just stir them into the hot pasta.





Hello,


Yes many variations can be made on this recipe. I like to add anchovies to this...


 


love

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 4:34 PM EST

love,


I'd add those, but Mrs. Lib doesn't like them.  At all.

Flag Girlchristian February 24, 2011 4:36 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 4:34PM, Christianlib wrote:


love,


I'd add those, but Mrs. Lib doesn't like them.  At all.





Mrs. Lib is a very smart woman then. ;-)

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 4:39 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 4:36PM, Girlchristian wrote:


Feb 24, 2011 -- 4:34PM, Christianlib wrote:


love,


I'd add those, but Mrs. Lib doesn't like them.  At all.





Mrs. Lib is a very smart woman then. ;-)




Debatable.  She's been married to me for nearly 30 years.  That should tell you something.

Flag Roodog February 24, 2011 4:41 PM EST

Dr Oz says if it's white don't eat it!

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 4:43 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 4:41PM, Roodog wrote:


Dr Oz says if it's white don't eat it!





 


Roodog,


Unfortunately I am and was raised Irish.  The potato is the basic staff of life.  (But I ususally cook and eat them with the skins on--not ALL white.)

Flag Roodog February 24, 2011 4:46 PM EST

Feb 24, 2011 -- 4:43PM, Christianlib wrote:


Feb 24, 2011 -- 4:41PM, Roodog wrote:


Dr Oz says if it's white don't eat it!





 


Roodog,


Unfortunately I am and was raised Irish.  The potato is the basic staff of life.  (But I ususally cook and eat them with the skins on--not ALL white.)





Speaking about white flour, white rice, white sugar; processed foods you know!

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 4:48 PM EST

Well, yeah.


 


 

Flag writingal1 February 24, 2011 4:53 PM EST

CL--it's not only the Irish who look fondly on ptotatoes. It's a staple in many cuisines.


Having been raised with a great fondness for them myself I've done a lot of reading on them and it turns out that they have a lot of good going for them--including the skins which have a lot of trace minerals etc.


The problem--as I have heard and read so often--is mostly in the toppings people put on baked potatoes for example--cheese and sour cream and bacon etc etc,


That's what's given them their bad rap.  A baked potato without any toppings has a really modest calorie component.


I'll check on it and come back with the number.

Flag writingal1 February 24, 2011 4:57 PM EST

Roo--I have a friend who was rather overweight and who lost 50+ pounds by eliminating a lot of white foods (including sour cream and cream cheese) from her diet. Her best example was using red sauces for spaghetti (which she loved) instead of white ones like Alfredo sauce.


The best part of her weight loss was that it was very gradual whic is supposed to be the best way to lose weight and keep it off. She has kept her weight off for a number of years now.


 

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 4:58 PM EST

WG,


I know the number.  Depending on the size of the spud, it's about 130 calories, before toppings.


 


I can still remember, growing up, that for a family of 4, my mother would buy a 10 lb. bag of potatoes EVERY WEEK.

Flag writingal1 February 24, 2011 5:06 PM EST

CL--hi.


I found numbers at about 60 calories for a peeled baked potato. Leaving the skin on adds about 100 calories.


Putting cheese and bacon on a baked potato puts the calorie count at about 600 calories.


 


BTW--I remember that weekly 10 lb bag of potatoes very well. I think it was a staple in a lot of houses for a long time.


We had a lot of soups and stews with potatoes as a major ingredient.

Flag Christianlib February 24, 2011 5:07 PM EST

Yes, leaving the peel on does add calories.  But it also preserves nutrients.


 


As in all things---moderation.

Flag Erey February 25, 2011 10:15 AM EST

At the store last week they were offerng samples of these new chips made out of black beans called Beanaritos (instead of Doritos I guess).  Instead of potato or corn they somehow mushed up and dried black beans and then baked it into a chip.  Actually quite good!  They had different seasoning choices like chipotle.


Each chip, which is about the size of your typical Lays potato chip has 1 gram of fiber, which I think is alot. 

Flag writingal1 February 25, 2011 2:00 PM EST

EREY--black beans like most legumes do have a lot of fiber. A can of black beans usually has the total amount of fiber recommended for one day.


The fact that those chips are baked instead of fried makes them pretty healthy too--depending on what else is in them--IE like the amount of salt and possible presence of the almost-ubiquitous high fructose corn syrup.


I'll have to look for them at my store and see what the other ingredients are.


 

Flag Roodog February 25, 2011 10:24 PM EST

My wife will make a stew with stirred fried veggie mix, broccoli, peppers, whole peas and greenbeans and carrots. It usually has me rushing to the outhouse. It that what it means that fiber's good fer ya?

Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 1:27 AM EST

Usually if one eats the daily recommended amount of 25 grams or more of fiber daily the body gets used to it and that kind of thing doesn't happen.


Also it is possible that that particular reaction is caused by an allergy to one or more of the ingredients in the stew.


Sometimes certain spices or very hot chilers can cause that kind of irritation.


Experiment by not using one of the ingredients each time and see if the absence of one of them results in the lack of that kind of irritation/reaction.


As always if you think you might have a phsyical problem it's best to consult a doctor.

Flag Roodog February 26, 2011 3:22 PM EST

Feb 26, 2011 -- 1:27AM, writingal1 wrote:


Usually if one eats the daily recommended amount of 25 grams or more of fiber daily the body gets used to it and that kind of thing doesn't happen.


Also it is possible that that particular reaction is caused by an allergy to one or more of the ingredients in the stew.


Sometimes certain spices or very hot chilers can cause that kind of irritation.


Experiment by not using one of the ingredients each time and see if the absence of one of them results in the lack of that kind of irritation/reaction.


As always if you think you might have a phsyical problem it's best to consult a doctor.




Aw, Gee, I thought that's what the veggies were SUPPOSED to do, relieve constapation!

Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 4:42 PM EST

Roo--hi.


Not quite.


Regular ingestion of circa 25 grams of fiber per day (the usaul reommened amount for most healthy adults) for most people creates regularity--so that constipation isn't even an issue.


Fruits and veggies also are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals--all necessary for healthy functrioning of the body.


BTW--the veggies you named--unless you eat a very large amount of them in that stew --are not all that full of fiber. But if one does not ingest circa 20-25 grams of fiber daily then even a small amount of fiber "suddenly" can create in some the problem you mention.


For most people a diet that includes an adequate amount of fiber rules out constipation problems.


That's just one of the benefits of eating more fruits and veggies and less fat-bearing foods.


Another is that foods with more fiber tend to take longer for the body  to digest thereby levelling out the amounts of nutrients that get into the bloodtream over time--which can usually keep a person feeling full and satisfied over much longer periods than eating fat-laden foods.

Flag Roodog February 26, 2011 8:11 PM EST

Which veggies are loaded with Fiber??

Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 8:53 PM EST

Roo-hi.


I have a pretty good idea but I want to do some online research so I can get a link for you. This may take me a while--so it will probably be tomorrow before I post the info.


 

Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 9:03 PM EST

High Fiber Food Chart

Category A (more than 7 grams per serving)

 FOOD  AMOUNT  TOTAL FIBER (grams)
 Avocado  1 medium
 11.84
 Black beans, cooked
 1 cup
 14.92
 Bran cereal
 1 cup
 19.94
 Broccoli, cooked
 1 cup
 4.50
 Green peas, cooked
 1 cup
 8.84
 Kale, cooked
 1 cup
 7.20
 Kidney beans, cooked
 1 cup
 13.33
 Lentils, cooked
 1 cup
 15.64
 Lima beans, cooked
 1 cup
 13.16
 Navy beans, cooked
 1 cup
 11.65
 Oats, dry
 1 cup
 12.00
 Pinto beans, cooked
 1 cup
 14.71
 Split peas, cooked
 1 cup
 16.27
 Raspberries  1 cup
 8.34
 Rice, brown, uncooked
 1 cup
 7.98
 Soybeans, cooked
 1 cup
 7.62


Category B (more than 3 grams per serving)

 FOOD  AMOUNT  TOTAL FIBER (grams)
 Almonds  1 oz.
 4.22
 Apple, w/ skin
 1 medium
 5.00
 Banana  1 medium
 3.92
 Blueberries  1 cup
 4.18
 Cabbage, cooked
 1 cup
 4.20
 Cauliflower, cooked
 1 cup
 3.43
 Corn, sweet
 1 cup
 4.66
 Figs, dried
 2 medium
 3.74
 Flax seeds
 3 tsp.
 6.97
 Garbanzo beans, cooked
 1 cup
 5.80
 Grapefruit  1/2 medium
 6.12
 Green beans, cooked
 1 cup
 3.95
 Olives  1 cup
 4.30
 Oranges, navel
 1 medium
 3.40
 Papaya  1 each
 5.47
 Pasta, whole wheat
 1 cup
 6.34
 Peach, dried
 3 pcs.
 3.18
 Pear  1 medium
 5.08
 Pistachio nuts
 1 oz.
 3.10
 Potato, baked w/ skin
 1 medium
 4.80
 Prunes  1/4 cup
 3.02
 Pumpkin seeds
 1/4 cup
 4.12
 Sesame seeds
 1/4 cup
 4.32
 Spinach, cooked
 1 cup
 3.98
 Strawberries  1 cup
 5.94
 Sweet potato, cooked
 1 cup
 3.68
 Swiss chard, cooked
 1 cup
 5.04
 Winter squash
 1 cup
 5.74
 Yam, cooked cubes
 1 cup
 5.30


Category C (less than 3 grams per serving)

 FOOD  AMOUNT  TOTAL FIBER (grams)
 Apricots  3 medium
 
Apricots, dried
 5 pieces
 2.89
 Asparagus, cooked
 1 cup
 2.88
 Beets, cooked
 1 cup
 2.85
 Bread, whole wheat
 1 slice
 2.00
 Brussels sprouts, cooked
 1 cup
 2.84
 Cantaloupe, cubes
 1 cup
 1.28
 Carrots, raw
 1 medium
 2.00
 Cashews  1 oz.
 1.00
 Celery  1 stalk
 1.02
 Collard greens, cooked
 1 cup
 2.58
 Cranberries  1/2 cup
 1.99
 Cucumber, sliced w/ peel
 1 cup
 0.83
 Eggplant, cooked cubes
 1 cup
 2.48
 Kiwifruit  1 each
 2.58
 Mushrooms, raw
 1 cup
 1.36
 Mustard greens, cooked
 1 cup
 2.80
 Onions, raw
 1 cup
 2.88
 Peanuts  1 oz.
 2.30
 Peach  1 medium
 2.00
 Peppers, sweet
 1 cup
 2.62
 Pineapple  1 cup
 1.86
 Plum  1 medium
 1.00
 Raisins  1.5 oz box
 1.60
 Romaine lettuce
 1 cup
 0.95
 Summer squash, cooked
 1 cup
 2.52
 Sunflower seeds
 1/4 cup
 3.00
 Tomato  1 medium
 1.00
 Walnuts  1 oz.
 2.98
 Zucchini, cooked
 1 cup
 2.63


0.98
Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 9:07 PM EST

The above chart is from


commonsensehealth.com/Diet-and-Nutrition...


I like this one because it lists all common foods in order of the amount of fiber thy contain.


Very handy chart.


I hope this helps.


 

Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 9:30 PM EST

Here's a chart by food type--veggies are at the bottom of the chart--





FruitsServing sizeTotal fiber (grams)*
Raspberries 1 cup 8.0
Pear, with skin 1 medium 5.5
Apple, with skin 1 medium 4.4
Strawberries (halves) 1 1/4 cup 3.8
Banana 1 medium 3.1
Orange 1 medium 3.1
Figs, dried 2 medium 1.6
Raisins 2 tablespoons 1.0
Grains, cereal & pastaServing sizeTotal fiber (grams)*
Spaghetti, whole-wheat, cooked 1 cup 6.2
Barley, pearled, cooked 1 cup 6.0
Bran flakes 3/4 cup 5.3
Oat bran muffin 1 medium 5.2
Oatmeal, quick, regular or instant, cooked 1 cup 4.0
Popcorn, air-popped 3 cups 3.5
Brown rice, cooked 1 cup 3.5
Bread, rye 1 slice 1.9
Bread, whole-wheat or multigrain 1 slice 1.9
Legumes, nuts & seedsServing sizeTotal fiber (grams)*
Split peas, cooked 1 cup 16.3
Lentils, cooked 1 cup 15.6
Black beans, cooked 1 cup 15.0
Lima beans, cooked 1 cup 13.2
Baked beans, vegetarian, canned, cooked 1 cup 10.4
Sunflower seed kernels 1/4 cup 3.9
Almonds 1 ounce (23 nuts) 3.5
Pistachio nuts 1 ounce (49 nuts) 2.9
Pecans 1 ounce (19 halves) 2.7
VegetablesServing sizeTotal fiber (grams)*
Artichoke, cooked 1 medium 10.3
Peas, cooked 1 cup 8.8
Broccoli, boiled 1 cup 5.1
Turnip greens, boiled 1 cup 5.0
Sweet corn, cooked 1 cup 4.2
Brussels sprouts, cooked 1 cup 4.1
Potato, with skin, baked 1 medium 2.9
Tomato paste 1/4 cup 2.7
Carrot, raw 1 medium 1.7

*Fiber content can vary between brands

Flag writingal1 February 26, 2011 9:33 PM EST

Here's the link for the above chart--


www.mayoclinic.com/health/high-fiber-foo...

Flag solfeggio February 26, 2011 9:56 PM EST

writingal -


Thanks for posting those fascinating charts, which I read carefully.  I never realised that an avocado had so much fiber! 


And beans - wow.  I make bean salad with chopped celery, onions, and pickles, with a dressing of olive oil and lemon juice and a little mustard, and I knew it was healthy and had fiber, but I didn't realise just how much.


Of course, one of the great things about fruits is that they're not only good for you, but they taste delicious, too.  What's tastier than fresh strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries?

Flag Ebon February 27, 2011 10:48 AM EST

Feb 26, 2011 -- 9:56PM, solfeggio wrote:

What's tastier than fresh strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries?



Just about anything :P

Flag Iwantamotto February 27, 2011 4:03 PM EST

solfeggio:   how dietary rules are always changing or



But they DO change.  One minute eggs are going to kill you, another minute and they're going to save your life.  Dietary rules change because of the agendas of various members of the food industry ... INCLUDING veggie farmers and health-food industries.  The REAL reason Person A can eat nothing but meat and live a long life and Person B can eat nothing but broccoli and live a long life and Person C can eat nothing but peanut butter sandwiches and live a long life is that everyone is *GASP* different and everyone has their own specific needs, which is something NOBODY in the food industries, from the cow people to the beet people seem to be able to recognize, because unless everyone subscribes to their program, they can't be as rich as they want to be.


And nobody ever defines 'moderation.'  I think what most people would like to believe is that it means you can eat anything and everything your little heart desires and not worry about it.



Eat some meat.  The veggies are making you rather slow, to the point of being silly.  :P


At any rate, as numerous medical studies have shown, the high-fiber diet is best for us



Not for people who must have a low-fiber diet.  Not ... everyone ... has ... equal ... needs.


The definition of 'moderation' is too vague and general a term to have any meaningful use when talking about diet.



Don't starve yourself.  Don't eat until you pop.  Is that so hard to grasp?


tmore35:  In my case it is likely that genetics has made a contribution to my cardiac problems. This is a major area in life we have absolutely no control over. My mom and her five brothers and sisters all had heart trouble.  However, most of them lived into their 80s, after going through heart attacks, open heart surgeries, medications and other procedures.



My family is rather long-lived, living well into the 80s if not 90s ... and I can guarantee you they didn't eat "healthy" throughout the years, nor did they live "healthy".  Usually, about the only time you die earlier than 80 is if something catastrophic hits you (like a Mack truck or something, LOL).  Whenever doctors ask me for a history, I tell them it's easier to say what family DIDN'T have, and I don't really worry about cancer because for the most part it only really shows up around the time I'm too old to do anything about it, really.  I'm not about to listen to people tell me how to live.  Given how picky of an eater I was, and to a lesser extent still am, I'm surprised I lived through childhood.  But I did -- which implies any devotee of any specific diet doesn't know what they are talking about at all.


writingal1:  Neither Solf nor I has said anything about not enjoying the kinds of foods you mention.



Except for the part where we are all going to die if we don't eat like you?


mytmouse57:  That's not for everybody, nor is it required to be healthy.



Samson, Hercules, John Henry ... all very fit and athletic folks.  All died young. :P


solfeggio:  If what you like is steaks larded with fat, or driving everywhere instead of walking, then, obviously, you may think you have a good quality of life, but you body will eventually tell you otherwise.



Unless your body, for one reason or another, can process it well.  I can eat a whole roll of crackers and not see a single spike in my blood pressure.  I can eat things with lots of sugar and my insulin does just peachy.  I am never told, aside from some whining about my weight, that my life is awful.  My family can live through lots of bad things.  My brother had a fever when he was a kid well over 100.  The doctors said he should be dead or severely brain-damaged.  And yet he is alive and well and very bright.  I was tossed out of a car as a kid (actually, fate tried to kill me off rather frequently, LOL) and no one said I should have lived.  And here I am.  I am not saying no one should be a vegetarian ... only that it is a mistake to generalize dietary needs.  Just because it works for you doesn't mean it's necessary for anyone else.


writingal1:  Roo--I have a friend who was rather overweight and who lost 50+ pounds by eliminating a lot of white foods (including sour cream and cream cheese) from her diet.



I lost the most pounds working at Burger King eating a mostly Whopper diet aside from breakfast.  Started picking up the carbs again, and got fired from a job that required a lot of walking (I worked at a zoo) ... and magically the weight came back on.

Flag writingal1 February 27, 2011 6:12 PM EST

"Not for people who must have a low-fiber diet.  Not ... everyone ... has ... equal ... needs."


 


 


Not a single person here has said anything but that each person should find out what their body's requiremensts are.


And nobody is talking about someone "starving"themselves.


But many people who don't have special health/medical needs have NO idea how little fiber they eat on a daily basis.


The suggested amount for a person with no special needs is 20-25 grams per day.


If people look at what they eat--read labels on food containers and look at the food like pizzas etc they eat without thinking about it--they would see that they don't even come close to that suggested amount.


Look at the two sets of charts I posted--especially the one with all five food groups--most people will see they don't come even close to 20 grams per day.


I'm not sure why you are trying to turn any of this into sore sort of argument.


The info has been presented clearly and with many warnings to adjust to individual needs...


 

Flag Christianlib February 27, 2011 7:12 PM EST

An interesting article about how McDonalds can even (nutritionally) screw up oatmeal.


 


opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/22...

Flag writingal1 February 27, 2011 7:30 PM EST

CL--that's a shame.


When I first saw an ad for the "oatmeal with fruit" I thought they might be doing something good.


and then I started to think about just how much sugar they could cram into it--and sure enough--they even mess up something potentially nutritious.


It's too bad that so many people eat so much overly-sweetened food that they can't even perceive through their taste buds that most fruit is naturally sweet.


 

Flag jane2 February 27, 2011 7:34 PM EST

Feb 27, 2011 -- 4:03PM, Iwantamotto wrote:


solfeggio:   how dietary rules are always changing or



But they DO change.  One minute eggs are going to kill you, another minute and they're going to save your life.  Dietary rules change because of the agendas of various members of the food industry ... INCLUDING veggie farmers and health-food industries.  The REAL reason Person A can eat nothing but meat and live a long life and Person B can eat nothing but broccoli and live a long life and Person C can eat nothing but peanut butter sandwiches and live a long life is that everyone is *GASP* different and everyone has their own specific needs, which is something NOBODY in the food industries, from the cow people to the beet people seem to be able to recognize, because unless everyone subscribes to their program, they can't be as rich as they want to be.


And nobody ever defines 'moderation.'  I think what most people would like to believe is that it means you can eat anything and everything your little heart desires and not worry about it.



Eat some meat.  The veggies are making you rather slow, to the point of being silly.  :P


At any rate, as numerous medical studies have shown, the high-fiber diet is best for us



Not for people who must have a low-fiber diet.  Not ... everyone ... has ... equal ... needs.


The definition of 'moderation' is too vague and general a term to have any meaningful use when talking about diet.



Don't starve yourself.  Don't eat until you pop.  Is that so hard to grasp?


tmore35:  In my case it is likely that genetics has made a contribution to my cardiac problems. This is a major area in life we have absolutely no control over. My mom and her five brothers and sisters all had heart trouble.  However, most of them lived into their 80s, after going through heart attacks, open heart surgeries, medications and other procedures.



My family is rather long-lived, living well into the 80s if not 90s ... and I can guarantee you they didn't eat "healthy" throughout the years, nor did they live "healthy".  Usually, about the only time you die earlier than 80 is if something catastrophic hits you (like a Mack truck or something, LOL).  Whenever doctors ask me for a history, I tell them it's easier to say what family DIDN'T have, and I don't really worry about cancer because for the most part it only really shows up around the time I'm too old to do anything about it, really.  I'm not about to listen to people tell me how to live.  Given how picky of an eater I was, and to a lesser extent still am, I'm surprised I lived through childhood.  But I did -- which implies any devotee of any specific diet doesn't know what they are talking about at all.


writingal1:  Neither Solf nor I has said anything about not enjoying the kinds of foods you mention.



Except for the part where we are all going to die if we don't eat like you?


mytmouse57:  That's not for everybody, nor is it required to be healthy.



Samson, Hercules, John Henry ... all very fit and athletic folks.  All died young. :P


solfeggio:  If what you like is steaks larded with fat, or driving everywhere instead of walking, then, obviously, you may think you have a good quality of life, but you body will eventually tell you otherwise.



Unless your body, for one reason or another, can process it well.  I can eat a whole roll of crackers and not see a single spike in my blood pressure.  I can eat things with lots of sugar and my insulin does just peachy.  I am never told, aside from some whining about my weight, that my life is awful.  My family can live through lots of bad things.  My brother had a fever when he was a kid well over 100.  The doctors said he should be dead or severely brain-damaged.  And yet he is alive and well and very bright.  I was tossed out of a car as a kid (actually, fate tried to kill me off rather frequently, LOL) and no one said I should have lived.  And here I am.  I am not saying no one should be a vegetarian ... only that it is a mistake to generalize dietary needs.  Just because it works for you doesn't mean it's necessary for anyone else.


writingal1:  Roo--I have a friend who was rather overweight and who lost 50+ pounds by eliminating a lot of white foods (including sour cream and cream cheese) from her diet.



I lost the most pounds working at Burger King eating a mostly Whopper diet aside from breakfast.  Started picking up the carbs again, and got fired from a job that required a lot of walking (I worked at a zoo) ... and magically the weight came back on.




Great thinking.......................and fun.




Flag Erey February 27, 2011 9:54 PM EST

I too am shocked about the avocado, I had no idea it was that high in fiber.  Surely they mean only the flesh of the avocado and they are not refering to eating the skin.  Nobody eats the skin, right?  Just that seems like a whole lot of fiber grams for an Avocado. 

Flag jane2 February 27, 2011 10:14 PM EST

Feb 27, 2011 -- 9:54PM, Erey wrote:


I too am shocked about the avocado, I had no idea it was that high in fiber.  Surely they mean only the flesh of the avocado and they are not refering to eating the skin.  Nobody eats the skin, right?  Just that seems like a whole lot of fiber grams for an Avocado. 




Not that long ago avocados were on the "bad" list because of "fat" content. Now we all cook with olive oil !!

Flag writingal1 February 28, 2011 10:29 AM EST

Okay.


Olive oil and avocados are two different things.

Flag jane2 February 28, 2011 11:31 PM EST

Thought this was interesting, from tonight's NYT :


Do you treat yourself as well as you treat your friends and family?


That simple question is the basis for a burgeoning new area of psychological research called self-compassion — how kindly people view themselves. People who find it easy to be supportive and understanding to others, it turns out, often score surprisingly low on self-compassion tests, berating themselves for perceived failures like being overweight or not exercising.


The research suggests that giving ourselves a break and accepting our imperfections may be the first step toward better health. People who score high on tests of self-compassion have less depression and anxiety, and tend to be happier and more optimistic. Preliminary data suggest that self-compassion can even influence how much we eat and may help some people lose weight.


This idea does seem at odds with the advice dispensed by many doctors and self-help books, which suggest that willpower and self-discipline are the keys to better health. But Kristin Neff, a pioneer in the field, says self-compassion is not to be confused with self-indulgence or lower standards


 well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/28/go-eas...

Flag rangerken March 8, 2011 8:12 PM EST

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