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Switch to Forum Live View Will you follow the guidelines?
3 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2011 - 4:45PM #1
solfeggio
Posts: 8,541
In an effort to alert Americans to the growing problem of obesity, the USDA has issued new dietary guidelines:

nutrition.about.com/od/nutrition101/qt/D...

www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/DietaryGu...

www.emaxhealth.com/1020/why-new-dietary-...

As you might expect, the guidelines emphasise more fruits and veggies in Americans' diets, but also that people should think about reducing their salt intake, as well as cutting down on sugary drinks like soda.

Saturated fat consumption should be lowered from 10% of total daily energy to no more than 7%.  And transfat consumption should be lowered as well.  The idea is for people to eat as little of these fatty acids as possible.

What's interesting is that, since the guidelines advise people to eat more seafood, this will be good news for the seafood industry.

www.packagingdigest.com/article/512567-N...

The guidelines are sensible enough, and people shouldn't have any trouble adjusting their diets to follow them.  But, considering the availablity and cheapness of all those fatty, salty fast foods, can Americans make a serious effort to cut back?  Even if their health depends upon it? 



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3 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2011 - 5:22PM #2
MMarcoe
Posts: 14,740

Feb 3, 2011 -- 4:45PM, solfeggio wrote:

In an effort to alert Americans to the growing problem of obesity, the USDA has issued new dietary guidelines:

nutrition.about.com/od/nutrition101/qt/D...

www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/DietaryGu...

www.emaxhealth.com/1020/why-new-dietary-...

As you might expect, the guidelines emphasise more fruits and veggies in Americans' diets, but also that people should think about reducing their salt intake, as well as cutting down on sugary drinks like soda.

Saturated fat consumption should be lowered from 10% of total daily energy to no more than 7%.  And transfat consumption should be lowered as well.  The idea is for people to eat as little of these fatty acids as possible.

What's interesting is that, since the guidelines advise people to eat more seafood, this will be good news for the seafood industry.

www.packagingdigest.com/article/512567-N...

The guidelines are sensible enough, and people shouldn't have any trouble adjusting their diets to follow them.  But, considering the availablity and cheapness of all those fatty, salty fast foods, can Americans make a serious effort to cut back?  Even if their health depends upon it? 






Americans can, but Americans probably won't unless the cost of all that fatty, salty food becomes too expensive. Which means the government needs to stop subsidizing all the wrong parts of agriculture and processing.

There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth.

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3 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2011 - 6:13PM #3
Girlchristian
Posts: 10,744
Other than the fish twice a week, I'm already following the guidelines. I believe in balance in one's diet and "unhealthy" stuff in moderation.
"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

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3 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2011 - 6:29PM #4
mountain_man
Posts: 38,100

Feb 3, 2011 -- 4:45PM, solfeggio wrote:

In an effort to alert Americans to the growing problem of obesity, the USDA has issued new dietary guidelines...




Too bad these are about 20 years late. This stuff was known long ago.



What's interesting is that, since the guidelines advise people to eat more seafood, this will be good news for the seafood industry.




That's not good news for our depleted, or soon to be depleted, fish stocks. It also doesn't help those that cannot afford fish. The only fish I can afford are tuna and that fake crab.

Just eat lower down on the food chain, eat less, exercise more, and you'll do fine. Eath a lot of colorful veggies too.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2011 - 7:39PM #5
solfeggio
Posts: 8,541
Mountain_man -

You point about depleted fish stocks is well taken, as these recent news items show:

www.upi.com/Science_News/2011/02/01/UN-W...

There's no doubt that fish is a healthier form of protein than meat, but unfortunately, most stocks of the most important commercial species of fish are sadly either fully or over exploited. 

In fact, fish consumption continues to rise even as stocks are depleted.  Tuna are on the verge of extinction:

www.aboutmyplanet.com/environment/fish-c...

www.thaindian.com/newsportal/enviornment...
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 03, 2011 - 7:39PM #6
jane2
Posts: 14,289

Feb 3, 2011 -- 4:45PM, solfeggio wrote:

In an effort to alert Americans to the growing problem of obesity, the USDA has issued new dietary guidelines:

nutrition.about.com/od/nutrition101/qt/D...

www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/DietaryGu...

www.emaxhealth.com/1020/why-new-dietary-...

As you might expect, the guidelines emphasise more fruits and veggies in Americans' diets, but also that people should think about reducing their salt intake, as well as cutting down on sugary drinks like soda.

Saturated fat consumption should be lowered from 10% of total daily energy to no more than 7%.  And transfat consumption should be lowered as well.  The idea is for people to eat as little of these fatty acids as possible.

What's interesting is that, since the guidelines advise people to eat more seafood, this will be good news for the seafood industry.

www.packagingdigest.com/article/512567-N...

The guidelines are sensible enough, and people shouldn't have any trouble adjusting their diets to follow them.  But, considering the availablity and cheapness of all those fatty, salty fast foods, can Americans make a serious effort to cut back?  Even if their health depends upon it? 






The only weight gains I've seen in my family in over 60 years are those that came from meds.

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3 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2011 - 3:05PM #7
Do_unto_others
Posts: 7,834
"Guidelines"???

Here all this time I thought they were mandates. Mrs Palin told her kids that on her now defunct TV show, so I thought it must be true.

;{O)
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2011 - 4:20PM #8
Christianlib
Posts: 21,848
A stroke, heart attack, or diabetes will get your attention.

Of course, the right just wants Americans to go ahead and die from those things.  Providing health care to Americans could cut into the money available for killing  people overseas.
Moderated by rangerken on Feb 04, 2011 - 05:50PM
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Republicans think the glass is theirs.
Libertarians want to break the glass, because they think a conspiracy created it.
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2011 - 5:46PM #9
Erey
Posts: 17,378

Feb 3, 2011 -- 6:29PM, mountain_man wrote:

Feb 3, 2011 -- 4:45PM, solfeggio wrote:

In an effort to alert Americans to the growing problem of obesity, the USDA has issued new dietary guidelines...




Too bad these are about 20 years late. This stuff was known long ago.



What's interesting is that, since the guidelines advise people to eat more seafood, this will be good news for the seafood industry.




That's not good news for our depleted, or soon to be depleted, fish stocks. It also doesn't help those that cannot afford fish. The only fish I can afford are tuna and that fake crab.

Just eat lower down on the food chain, eat less, exercise more, and you'll do fine. Eath a lot of colorful veggies too.





Fish is sort of like steak - an expensive delicacy.
tuna is great and I make some nice things with canned tuna.  People love Tilapia which is a cheap fish (I don't care for it).
I love, love fake crab which I am told is really sting ray but it is probably not good for you

At certain times of the year you can get a good price on Tuna, crawfish, salmon and lobsters were cheap at the end of last year. 

I think you can eat lower on the food chain.  I think a exercise full life where you are fit and trim from your exercise even though you eat a few burgers a week is better than the fussier expensive lifestyle where you don't get much exercise. 


We all have to die but hopefully we can live well while alive.  Your food choices should help you live well while you can.   A life with plenty of exercise, fruit and veggies goes a long way. 

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3 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2011 - 6:07PM #10
teilhard
Posts: 48,399
MY Guidelines -- Dark Chocolate ... Red Wine ...
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